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January 6, 2014

Living Oil: Petroleum Culture in the American Century

Living OilAuthor: Stephanie LeMenager

Living Oil: Petroleum and Culture in the American Century, is a work of environmental cultural studies that engages with a wide spectrum of cultural forms, from museum exhibits and oil industry tours to poetry, documentary film, fiction, still photography, novels and memoirs. The book’s unique focus is the aesthetic, sensory and emotional legacies of petroleum, from its rise to the preeminent modern fossil fuel during World War I through the current era of so-called Tough Oil.

Art’s Undoing: In the Wake of a Radical Aestheticism

Pyle BookAuthor: Forest Pyle

Art’s Undoing: In the Wake of a Radical Aestheticism (2013) is about radical aestheticism, the term that best describes a recurring event in some of the most powerful and resonating texts of nineteenth-century British literature. A radical aestheticism offers us the best way to reckon with what takes place at certain moments in certain texts by Shelley, Keats, Dickinson, Hopkins, D.G. Rossetti, and Wilde when aestheticized representations reach their radicalization. (more…)

Cambridge Companion to Literature and the Environment

Editor: Louise Westling

Louise Westling’s Cambridge Companion to Literature and the Environment (2013) includes contributions from experts in the interdisciplinary field of environmental literary criticism. The collection traces the development of ecocriticism from its origins in European pastoral literature to contemporary environmental literary scholarship [dealing with] an array of issues such as the place of the human within nature, ecofeminism, critical animal studies, postcolonialism, posthumanism, and climate change.

November 22, 2013

“Wonder Woman in Bondage”: Professor Ben Saunders talks superheroes with KNPR.

1 ben saundersProfessor Ben Saunders discusses Wonder Women and his Vegas Valley Comic Festival presentation, “Wonder Woman in Bondage: Gender, Power and the Amazon Superhero,” with KNPR. Hear about the wonderful and unorthodox intellectual life of, William Moulton Marston, the comic’s creator. (more…)

October 4, 2013

Rhetoric of Reason

 Author:  James Crosswhite

To those who have lost faith in the abilities of people to reach reasoned mutual agreements, and to others who have attacked the right-or-wrong model of formal logic, this book offers the reminder that the rhetorical tradition has always viewed argumentation as a dialogue, a response to changing situations, an exchange of persuading, listening, and understanding. (more…)

Philosophy & Rhetoric – Special Issue

Author:  James Crosswhite

 James Crosswhite edited and wrote the introduction and closing article for this special issue of the journal Philosophy and Rhetoric, which includes contributors from Belgium, Canada, Germany, and the US. English Department graduate student William Driscoll and UO Honors College Dean David Frank developed a definitive scholarly bibliography on the new rhetoric project for the volume.  (more…)

Deep Rhetoric

Author: James Crosswhite
 

In Deep Rhetoric (University of Chicago Press, 2013) James Crosswhite shows that a more serious approach to rhetoric and its tradition can provide a vital new understanding of the capabilities that are essential for living and working and participating in roughly free and democratic societies. His book explains not only the philosophical seriousness of rhetoric, but also rhetoric’s potential for guiding and conducting conflicts, achieving justice, and understanding the human condition—as well as its power to generate the goals and processes of a liberal arts education.

October 1, 2013

Women’s Work and Black Cultural Nationalism: Professor Courtney Thorsson discusses her new book on the WURD

Professor Courtney Thorsson discusses her new book, Women’s Work: Nationalism and Contemporary African American Women’s Novels, with Philadelphia’s 900 am WURD. In her book, Thorsson reconsiders the gender, genre, and geography of African American nationalism as she explores the aesthetic history of African American writing by women. (more…)

Women’s Work: Nationalism and Contemporary African American Women’s Novels

Thorsson Women's Work

Author:  Courtney Thorsson

In Women’s Work, Courtney Thorsson reconsiders the gender, genre, and geography of African American nationalism as she explores the aesthetic history of African American writing by women. Building on and departing from the Black Arts Movement, the literary fiction of such writers as Toni Cade Bambara, Paule Marshall, Gloria Naylor, Ntozake Shange, and Toni Morrison employs a cultural nationalism—practiced by their characters as “women’s work”—that defines a distinct contemporary literary movement, demanding attention to the continued relevance of nation in post–Black Arts writing. Identifying five forms of women’s work as organizing, dancing, mapping, cooking, and inscribing, Thorsson shows how these writers reclaimed and revised cultural nationalism to hail African America.

September 3, 2013

The Dark Knight vs The Dork Knight: Professor Ben Saunders explains the two sides of Batman to Radio National’s The List

In his second appearance on the Australian Broadcasting Corporation’s Radio National program The List, UO English Professor Ben Saunders, author of Do the Gods Wear Capes? Spirituality, Fantasy, and Superheroes, discusses the controversy over casting Ben Affleck as The Caped Crusader in the upcoming “Man of Steel” sequel. (more…)

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