FLR483 201702 Undergraduate

Term: 
Winter 2018
Course: 
FLR 483
Applies To: 
Undergraduate
Sections: 
Title: 
Folklore and Mythology of the British Isles
Instructors: 

Dianne Dugaw

Dianne Dugaw profile picture
  • Title: Professor
  • Phone: 541-346-1496
  • Office: 458 PLC
  • Office Hours: Spring term: MW 3:30-4:30
Department Section Description: 

The complex cultural history of Great Britain and Ireland is the focus of this course. We study folk and popular traditions that are current or have been collected in this region, particularly noting how these influence art, literature, history, and socio-political institutions as well as customary life. Beginning with the Celts, we trace interactions and identities of early historical cultures especially as their legacies persist. The course has two parts:  (1) a focus on myth, belief, and worship, and the values these embody, examined through narratives and the objects of materials culture; and (2) a focus on customs and performance as examined through ceremonies, festivals, music, folk drama, and dance. At every point we consider the larger mechanism of cultural syncretism and the popular imagination.

Fulfills: 

Major I: B-Literature 1500-1789

Literature, 1500-1789 courses focus on writings during the period of European exploration and colonization -- from the early English Renaissance to the late eighteenth-century -- in order to foster familiarity with key works in British and American literary history.  Literary history illustrates how literary works reflect, address, and resist the social and political environments in which they are produced as well as other works that have preceded them.  The study of early periods in particular sensitizes readers to historical transformations of the language itself.

Major I: E-Folklore, Ethnic & Women's Literature

Folklore/Ethnic/Women’s Literature courses focus on works  in Folklore, ethnic American writing, and writing by women.

Major II: B-Literature 1500-1789

Literature, 1500-1789 courses focus on writings during the period of European exploration and colonization -- from the early English Renaissance to the late eighteenth-century -- in order to foster familiarity with key works in British and American literary history.  Literary history illustrates how literary works reflect, address, and resist the social and political environments in which they are produced as well as other works that have preceded them.  The study of early periods in particular sensitizes readers to historical transformations of the language itself.

Major II: E-Media/Folklore/Culture

Media, Folklore, and/or Culture courses focus on print and non-print media to explore culture and its processes of creative expression.

IP

Multicultural, Identity, Pluralism, and Tolerance (IP) courses examine the social construction of collective identities, the emergence of representative voices from varying social and cultural standpoints, and the effects of prejudice, intolerance, and discrimination. The purpose of courses in this category is to analyze the general principles underlying tolerance, or the lack of it.