ENG436 201802 Undergraduate

Term: 
Winter 2019
Course: 
ENG 436
Applies To: 
Undergraduate
Sections: 
Title: 
Advanced Shakespeare
Instructors: 

Brent Dawson

Brent Dawson profile picture
  • Title: Assistant Professor
  • Phone: 541-346-3962
  • Office: 473 PLC
  • Office Hours: Fall Term: T 9-12
Department Section Description: 

Students in this course will closely read Shakespeare’s plays and poems, attending to Shakespeare’s rich language, nuanced characters, and persistent fascination toward topics of the self, desire, imagination, and group identity. In the first half of the course, students will look at examples from several recent critical approaches to Shakespeare, including animal studies, post-colonial studies, sense studies, and queer theory. In the second half, students will learn about how Shakespeare became “Shakespeare,” the iconic figure of popular and high culture, examining how different cultures and eras have re-interpreted his plays and biography. We will examine some contemporary films, short stories, and graphic novels that continue this process of re-interpretation. Prereq: Junior standing.

Fulfills: 

Major I: B-Literature 1500-1789

Literature, 1500-1789 courses focus on writings during the period of European exploration and colonization -- from the early English Renaissance to the late eighteenth-century -- in order to foster familiarity with key works in British and American literary history.  Literary history illustrates how literary works reflect, address, and resist the social and political environments in which they are produced as well as other works that have preceded them.  The study of early periods in particular sensitizes readers to historical transformations of the language itself.

Major II: B-Literature 1500-1789

Literature, 1500-1789 courses focus on writings during the period of European exploration and colonization -- from the early English Renaissance to the late eighteenth-century -- in order to foster familiarity with key works in British and American literary history.  Literary history illustrates how literary works reflect, address, and resist the social and political environments in which they are produced as well as other works that have preceded them.  The study of early periods in particular sensitizes readers to historical transformations of the language itself.