ENG425 201802 Undergraduate

Term: 
Winter 2019
Course: 
ENG 425
Applies To: 
Undergraduate
Sections: 
Title: 
Medieval Romance
Instructors: 

C. Anne Laskaya

C. Anne Laskaya profile picture
  • Title: Associate Professor
  • Phone: 541-346-1517
  • Office: 357 PLC
  • Office Hours: Fall term: W 1-3 pm except 11/7; F 10-11 except 11/2.
Department Section Description: 

This course offers students an exploration of a narrative genre that eventually gives rise to the novel, to fantasy literature, and even to science fiction narrative. The genre of Medieval Romance is usually (but not exclusively) a genre focused on a quest narrative, the development of the self, and the relationship of individual to community (or family). Transgressions of all kinds form common key elements in medieval romance narrative. Love stories are common, but so are stories of adventure, stories of identity development, and stories that read sometimes like very moral, saintly endurance narratives.  Readings will be primarily in Middle English, though the most difficult texts (whether in Middle English or Anglo-Norman) will be read in modern English translation. Requirements include: attendance, participation, quizzes, 2 papers, final exam.

Fulfills: 

Major I: A-Literature Pre-1500

Literature, Pre-1500 courses focus on writings produced from the Anglo-Saxon to late medieval periods to foster familiarity with key works in British and American literary history.  Literary history illustrates how literary works reflect, address, and resist the social and political environments in which they are produced as well as other works that have preceded them.  The study of early periods in particular sensitizes readers to historical transformations of the language itself.

Major II: A-Literature Pre-1500

Literature, Pre-1500 courses focus on writings produced from the Anglo-Saxon to late medieval periods to foster familiarity with key works in British and American literary history.  Literary history illustrates how literary works reflect, address, and resist the social and political environments in which they are produced as well as other works that have preceded them.  The study of early periods in particular sensitizes readers to historical transformations of the language itself.