ENG316 201704 Undergraduate

Term: 
Summer 2018
Course: 
ENG 316
Applies To: 
Undergraduate
Sections: 
Title: 
Special Topic: Women Writers
Instructors: 

Kara Clevinger

Kara Clevinger profile picture
  • Title: Career Instructor
  • Phone: 541-346-1514
  • Office: 22 PLC
  • Office Hours: Spring term: TUES/THUR 1:30-3:00 & by appt.
Department Section Description: 

Who is the American “I”? Rugged individualism has long been central to American identity and culture, but what perspectives and possibilities are excluded from the “I” crafted by male writers like Benjamin Franklin, Henry David Thoreau, Frederick Douglass, and Ernest Hemingway? In our course we will explore how women used the autobiographical form to open up and expand the American “I.” We will study first-person writing by women from early to contemporary America in their historical and cultural contexts as well as within the traditions of American autobiography and feminism. What unique challenges have women writers faced in making their private lives public? How do women writers both draw from and complicate the popular self-made man narrative? Students will apply historical, cultural, formal, and feminist theoretical knowledge to a critical analysis of primary works that will include Fanny Fern’s Ruth Hall, Harriet Jacobs’ Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, Zitkala-Ša’s American Indian Stories, and Alison Bechdel’s Fun Home.

Fulfills: 

Old Major: C-Literature 1789-Present

Literature, 1789 to the present courses focus on literary work produced over more than two centuries -- from the period of British romanticism and the early republic of the United States up to now -- in order to foster familiarity with key works in British and American literary history.  Literary history illustrates how literary works reflect, address, and resist the social and political environments in which they are produced as well as other works that have preceded them.

Old Major: E-Folklore, Ethnic & Women's Literature

Folklore/Ethnic/Women’s Literature courses focus on works  in Folklore, ethnic American writing, and writing by women.

C-Literature 1789-Present

Literature, 1789 to the present courses focus on literary work produced over more than two centuries -- from the period of British romanticism and the early republic of the United States up to now -- in order to foster familiarity with key works in British and American literary history.  Literary history illustrates how literary works reflect, address, and resist the social and political environments in which they are produced as well as other works that have preceded them.

F-Gender/Ability/Queer Studies/Sexuality

Gender, Ability, Queer Studies, and/or Sexuality courses focus on the ways that issues of sexuality, gender, queerness, and disability are represented, critiqued, and developed in media and literature.

English Minor

English Minor courses offer students centuries of cultural experience and representation in poetry, prose, drama, film, TV, new media, and folk artifacts.  The English minor can focus and extend the values of a liberal arts education, while also providing extensive training in writing, speaking, and critical thinking.