ENG244 201702 Undergraduate

Term: 
Winter 2018
Course: 
ENG 244
Applies To: 
Undergraduate
Sections: 
Title: 
Introduction to Native American Literature
Instructors: 

Joyce Pualani Warren

Joyce Pualani Warren profile picture
  • Title: PostDoctoral Scholar Eth. Lit
  • Phone: 541-346-3953
  • Office: 265 PLC
  • Office Hours: Not teaching winter term; available by email
Department Section Description: 

What story does your body tell? Beyond the assumptions others may make based on physical appearance, or what you might convey through adornment, what narrative does your body perpetuate? The Proto Polynesian word “tatau” (tattoo) is both a noun, the physical mark inscribed on the body, and a verb, to write. Rooted in this etymology, this course will examine Pacific Islander and Native American bodies within and across the Pacific Ocean, treating them as texts that tell the stories of individuals and communities. As a result of forces such as colonialism, migration, and tourism, the contemporary Pacific and the United States are home to myriad bodies, which are often a complex amalgamation of diverse races, nationalities, cultural perspectives, sexualities, and socioeconomic classes. We will analyze a wide range of sources—fiction, film, drama, essays, paintings, photographs, legal documents, rap music, comedy sketches, and even beauty pageants—to examine the ways contemporary Native peoples navigate and instigate the multiple and overlapping readings of their bodies as texts. We will pay special attention to the ways Native authors and artists draw on international and/or transnational cultural, intellectual, and political ideas and movements to create inter/textual notions of global Native identities.

Fulfills: 

A & L

Arts & Letters (A&L) courses create meaningful opportunities for students to engage actively in the modes of inquiry that define a discipline. Courses are broad in scope and demonstrably liberal in nature (that is, courses that promote open inquiry from a variety of perspectives). Though some courses may focus on specialized subjects or approaches, there will be a substantial course content locating that subject in the broader context of the major issues of the discipline. Qualifying courses will not focus on teaching basic skills but will require the application or engagement of those skills through analysis and interpretation.

IP

Multicultural, Identity, Pluralism, and Tolerance (IP) courses examine the social construction of collective identities, the emergence of representative voices from varying social and cultural standpoints, and the effects of prejudice, intolerance, and discrimination. The purpose of courses in this category is to analyze the general principles underlying tolerance, or the lack of it.

Major I: Lower-Division Elective

Lower-division Elective courses allow students to choose (or “elect”) courses or faculty specific to their own developing interests, enabling them thereby to shape their own educational experience.

Major II: Lower-Division Elective

Lower-division Elective courses allow students to choose (or “elect”) courses or faculty specific to their own developing interests, enabling them thereby to shape their own educational experience.  Major II students can also use one lower-division elective to fulfill the Writing Requirement with ENG 209 The Craft of the Sentence.