ENG205 202101 Undergraduate

Term: 
Fall 2021
Course: 
ENG 205
Applies To: 
Undergraduate
Sections: 
Title: 
Topic: Robot Stories
Instructors: 

Lara Bovilsky

Lara Bovilsky profile picture
  • Title: Associate Professor
  • Phone: 541-346-1309
  • Office: 246 PLC
  • Office Hours: S21: W 10:45-noon, Th 10-11:15, and by appointment
Department Section Description: 

This course will survey the history of stories about the creation of artificial humans, while thinking about conventions of the genre, its particular uses and adaptations, and how it intersects with other genres. We’ll look at the desires expressed by this genre: most of all, the desire to perfect or eliminate what is most human. Familiar questions – can robots feel? can we tell who is a robot? – will be considered alongside the traditional use of robots to understand or emblematize justice, sin, labor, progress and modernity, self-awareness or simplicity, gender, emotion and indifference, skill, invention, and art itself. Texts will be drawn from literature, film, and real-world examples, including Homer, Spenser, Descartes, Vaucanson, Shelley, Hoffmann, Capek, Lem, Metropolis, Terminator 2, and Blade Runner

ENG 205 is open to all students. This course (in any of its versions) is required for the English major. It is a pre- or corequisite of the Foundations of the English Major series (ENG 303-305).  

Fulfills: 

Lower-Division Elective

Lower-division Elective courses allow students to choose (or “elect”) courses or faculty specific to their own developing interests, enabling them thereby to shape their own educational experience.  Major II students can also use one lower-division elective to fulfill the Writing Requirement with ENG 209 The Craft of the Sentence.

Genre

Genre courses address a single literary/cinematic genre or “kind.”-- such as tragedy, autobiography, lyric, romance, etc.-- with the purpose of teaching students to read and perform critical, formal analyses of literary, cinematic, and cultural texts.  These courses help prepare students for the backbone of our curriculum: the Foundations of the English Major sequence (ENG 301-2-3).

English Minor

English Minor courses offer students centuries of cultural experience and representation in poetry, prose, drama, film, TV, new media, and folk artifacts.  The English minor can focus and extend the values of a liberal arts education, while also providing extensive training in writing, speaking, and critical thinking.
 

Title: 
Topic: Testimonio
Instructors: 

José Cortez

José Cortez profile picture
  • Title: Assistant Professor
  • Phone: 541-346-0069
  • Office: 319 PLC
  • Office Hours: Spring 2021: WED 1:00-3:30pm
Department Section Description: 

Testimonio is a form of lifewriting whose narrator is a “real” protagonist, or witness, of the events he/she recounts. Although lifewriting can be located in several different literary categories, one of the defining features of a testimonio, as (re)defined in the 1960’s and 1970’s, is its overt concern with issues of social justice, embodying the mantra of “the personal is political.” In this course we will read from an archive of first-person narrated texts to explore the ways memory, trauma, violence and narration dictate and potentially subvert the story produced from this act of “bearing witness.” We will also examine the power dynamic involved in representing one’s life story, or in the attempt to (re)present the stories of others. For instance, who has access to tell their story? What types of stories get published and heard? In addition, we will employ theories from the areas of subaltern studies, genre theory, feminism and cultural theory, to examine how the production of testimonio challenges the binaries between the categories of fact/fiction, literature/science, insider/outsider and subject/object.

ENG 205 is open to all students. This course (in any of its versions) is required for the English major. It is a pre- or corequisite of the Foundations of the English Major series (ENG 303-305).  

Fulfills: 

Lower-Division Elective

Lower-division Elective courses allow students to choose (or “elect”) courses or faculty specific to their own developing interests, enabling them thereby to shape their own educational experience.  Major II students can also use one lower-division elective to fulfill the Writing Requirement with ENG 209 The Craft of the Sentence.

Genre

Genre courses address a single literary/cinematic genre or “kind.”-- such as tragedy, autobiography, lyric, romance, etc.-- with the purpose of teaching students to read and perform critical, formal analyses of literary, cinematic, and cultural texts.  These courses help prepare students for the backbone of our curriculum: the Foundations of the English Major sequence (ENG 301-2-3).

English Minor

English Minor courses offer students centuries of cultural experience and representation in poetry, prose, drama, film, TV, new media, and folk artifacts.  The English minor can focus and extend the values of a liberal arts education, while also providing extensive training in writing, speaking, and critical thinking.