ENG205 201902 Undergraduate

Term: 
Winter 2020
Course: 
ENG 205
Applies To: 
Undergraduate
Sections: 
Title: 
Genre: Romance
Instructors: 

Kirby Brown

Kirby Brown profile picture
  • Title: Associate Professor
  • Additional Title: Norman H. Brown Faculty Fellow, 2019-21
  • Phone: 541-346-5819
  • Office: 330 PLC
  • Office Hours: Fall term: TUES 1-3, WED 11-12, & by email appt.
  • Website: Website
Department Section Description: 

Though signifying idealized notions of love in popular parlance, romance is about more than the transcendent power and emotional magic of romantic love. As a genre (an expressive form with recognizable and elastic conventions) and as a narrative mode (a specific way of structuring and telling stories), romance explores tensions ranging from class conflict and anxieties over religious, racial, and national identity to the collapse of social institutions, normative authority, and society itself. Understood in these terms, romance permeates everything from “serious” literature and “high” culture to Harlequin romances and pulp western fictions, and finds expression in a variety of forms ranging from epic poems, Renaissance dramas, and gothic novels to speculative fiction, superhero comics, and postapocalyptic TV series and blockbuster films.

 

This class will explore the romance through close attention to a handful of representative texts across a variety of forms. While not attempting anything approximating comprehensive historical coverage, it will situate primary texts in relation to the historical contexts and debates out of which they emerge and to which they’re responding and adapting. We’ll pay particular attention to the development of formal conventions and narrative strategies that mark a romance as such. Along the way, we’ll also develop a shared critical vocabulary and a set of analytic tools to interpret various expressions, complications, and refusals of the genre/mode.

Fulfills: 

Genre

Genre courses address a single literary/cinematic genre or “kind.”-- such as tragedy, autobiography, lyric, romance, etc.-- with the purpose of teaching students to read and perform critical, formal analyses of literary, cinematic, and cultural texts.  These courses help prepare students for the backbone of our curriculum: the Foundations of the English Major sequence (ENG 301-2-3).

English Minor

English Minor courses offer students centuries of cultural experience and representation in poetry, prose, drama, film, TV, new media, and folk artifacts.  The English minor can focus and extend the values of a liberal arts education, while also providing extensive training in writing, speaking, and critical thinking.
 

Old Major: Lower-Division Elective

Lower-division Elective courses allow students to choose (or “elect”) courses or faculty specific to their own developing interests, enabling them thereby to shape their own educational experience.

Title: 
Genre: Comedy
Instructors: 

Brent Dawson

Brent Dawson profile picture
  • Title: Assistant Professor
  • Phone: 541-346-3962
  • Office: 473 PLC
  • Office Hours: Not teaching, checking uoregon email periodically
Department Section Description: 

This course is an introduction to the genre of comedy. It surveys examples of comedy across a long historical range—from classical Greece to contemporary America—and a breadth of media forms, including drama, novel, film, and stand-up. Among other questions, we’ll ask: why is comedy so difficult to define, despite its persistence across history and saturation of everyday life? Why is it often treated as less important or meaningful than other genres, like tragedy? If comedy is light entertainment, why is it so often the genre that most directly comments on politics? How can comedy be at once associated with the best and worst of living with people, of laughing at others and laughing with others? 

Fulfills: 

Genre

Genre courses address a single literary/cinematic genre or “kind.”-- such as tragedy, autobiography, lyric, romance, etc.-- with the purpose of teaching students to read and perform critical, formal analyses of literary, cinematic, and cultural texts.  These courses help prepare students for the backbone of our curriculum: the Foundations of the English Major sequence (ENG 301-2-3).

English Minor

English Minor courses offer students centuries of cultural experience and representation in poetry, prose, drama, film, TV, new media, and folk artifacts.  The English minor can focus and extend the values of a liberal arts education, while also providing extensive training in writing, speaking, and critical thinking.
 

Old Major: Lower-Division Elective

Lower-division Elective courses allow students to choose (or “elect”) courses or faculty specific to their own developing interests, enabling them thereby to shape their own educational experience.