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University of Oregon

Spring 2015


ENG 104               Introduction to Literature                                                                                                                                 4 Sections
Actual reading lists vary significantly depending on the expertise and teaching philosophy of the instructor, but all sections of the course offer students a broad introduction to the study of literary fiction. Whether readings focus on the stories and novels of major writers or on works from a specific period or national tradition, students develop analytical skills that will allow them to think, write, and speak intelligently about fiction. The course addresses basic questions about the nature of prose narrative and the interrelated activities of reading, writing, and interpretation. What is a story, and what role do stories play in our cultural and political lives? Is interpretation of a literary text a purely subjective process, or are some interpretations more valid than others? Narrative technique, point of view, and character development are some of the terms and concepts examined in the course, though each instructor will bring his or her own analytical framework to the class. Weekly readings of short stories and novels are substantial in scope and difficulty, and students will be asked to compose critical essays of varying length, totaling at least 8-10 pages. As a basic introduction to a major genre in the field of literary studies, this course satisfies the university’s Group Requirement in the Arts and Letters category. It is not recommended for English Majors, who are encouraged to enroll in the department’s more historically oriented and comprehensive Introduction to the English Major sequence, ENG 220-222.
Gen Ed

 


ENG 105                Introduction to Literature: Drama                                                                                                                           Miles, Martina
This course is an introduction to drama, one of the major genres in literary studies. Students will read, discuss, and analyze plays from a variety of periods and national traditions in order to become familiar with the major styles, techniques, and conventions that characterize dramatic literature. Although this is a course on drama as literature, with an emphasis on the interpretation and analysis of dramatic texts, students will explore the performative dimensions of drama as well. The course will provide a broad introduction to theoretical and historical debates that stand at the center literary studies today, and students will have the chance to enter into these debates through critical writing assignments totaling at least 8-10 pages. Readings typically average one play per week, in addition to which students may be expected to attend out-of-class screenings of dramatic performances. As a basic introduction to texts, issues and questions that are central to the study of dramatic literature, this course satisfies the university’s Group Requirement in the Arts and Letters category. It is not recommended for English Majors, who are encouraged to enroll in the departments more historically oriented and comprehensive Introduction to the English Major sequence, ENG 220-222.
Gen Ed

 

ENG 106               Introduction to Literature: Poetry                                                                                                    3 sections
This course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of the formal properties of poetry in English. Through careful analysis of poems by major writers, students will be challenged to explain not only what a given poem might mean to its readers, but also how a poem communicates meaning differently than a work of fiction, drama, or some other mode of literary expression. ENG 106 is not a comprehensive introduction to the traditions of English and American poetry; it is, rather, a series of intensive exercises designed to equip students with the analytical tools needed to read, discuss, and write about poetry effectively. Weekly readings are relatively short but extremely demanding, and students will do a substantial amount of critical writing, including formal essays totaling at least 8-10 pages. As a basic introduction a major genre in the field of literary studies, this course satisfies the university’s Group Requirement in the Arts and Letters category. It is not recommended for English Majors, who are encouraged to enroll in the department’s more historically oriented and comprehensive Introduction to the English Major sequence, ENG 220-222.
Gen Ed 

 

ENG 109               World Literature                                                                                                                                  Green, Jordan
This is one of three courses that form a three-part chronological survey of international trends in literature from its archaic and classical origins to the present. These courses can be taken as a yearlong sequence, or they can be taken individually. All works are read in English translation. There are no prerequisites, and no background knowledge of international literary history is expected. All three courses seek to give students a truly global sense of literary history by incorporating works in various genres from Asia, the Near East, Africa, Latin America, Europe, North America, and elsewhere. ENG 107 begins with the archaic period and ends with the late Middle Ages in Europe. ENG 108 spans the period from the European Renaissance to the beginnings of the Industrial Revolution, focusing on cultural relations between the Near East and Europe. ENG 109 covers the 19th and 20th centuries, with emphasis on the emergence of global cultural movements such as Romanticism, Modernism, and Post-Modernism. All three courses seek to juxtapose Western and non- Western readings, challenging students to locate “classic” literary works within a global perspective. Weekly readings of short stories and novels are substantial in scope and difficulty, and students will be asked to compose critical essays of varying length, totaling at least 8-10 pages. With their comparative focus on various literary traditions, all three courses satisfy the University Multicultural Requirement in the International Cultures category. In offering students a broad introduction to college-level literary studies, ENG 107, 108, and 109 also satisfy the university’s Group Requirement in the Arts and Letters category.
Gen Ed; Multicultural; Elective

 

ENG 110               Introduction to Film and Media                                                                                         O’Kelly, Brendan
Basic critical approaches to film and media studies. Analysis and interpretation of film and media.
Gen Ed; Elective

 

ENG 199               Freshman Seminar Special Study: Romancing  the T(w)een                             Boscha, Tina
J.K. Rowling became the world’s first billion-dollar author. Stephenie Meyer (author Twilight) earns screams from her devoted fan base. In the last decade, young adult literature has exploded in mainstream culture, becoming one of the most potent forces in publishing. As might be expected in literature written for youth ages 12-18, romantic love is often the driving force in the lives of the book’s characters. But is this young love as innocent as it appears? What is upheld as the romantic love ideal? In what ways is sex depicted? How do these constructs affect the treatment of gender roles? Examine contemporary young adult literature, searching for ways that authors reinforce or challenge traditional ideas about love, sex, sexual orientation, and what it means to be a girl or boy in American culture.
 Elective 



ENG 200               Public Speaking as a Liberal Art                                                                                                                    Gage, John
Study  and practice of public speaking as grounded in the five rhetorical canons of invention, arrangement, style delivery and memory.
Elective



ENG 207               Shakespeare                                                                                                                              Horton, Kathleen
Students read, discuss, and critique Shakespeare’s early comedies and tragedies. Plays covered generally include (but are not limited to) A Mid-Summer Night’s Dream, The Merchant of Venice, Henry IV (Part One), Richard II, Henry V, Julius Caesar, and Hamlet. Weekly readings and occasional screenings of plays demand a considerable investment of time and effort, in addition to which students will be asked to compose critical essays of varying length, totaling at least 8-10 pages. The course introduces students to central questions in the study of dramatic art, as well as to issues pertaining more broadly to the study of literature in English. Students will leave the course having read extensively from the works of one of the major writers of the western tradition, and they will have acquired interpretive, analytical, and communication skills that will aid them in their future coursework in English and other disciplines. ENG 207 satisfies the university’s Group Requirement in the Arts and Letters category.
Gen Ed; Shakespeare

 


ENG 208               Shakespeare                                                                                                                                                           2 Sections
Students read, discuss, and critique Shakespeare’s later comedies and tragedies. Plays covered in ENG 208 generally include (but are not limited to) Twelfth Night, Measure for Measure, King Lear, Macbeth, Anthony and Cleopatra, The Tempest, and Othello. Weekly readings and occasional screenings of plays demand a considerable investment of time and effort, in addition to which students will be asked to compose critical essays of varying length, totaling at least 8-10 pages. The course introduces students to central questions in the study of dramatic art, as well as to issues pertaining more broadly to the study of literature in English. Students will leave the course having read extensively from the works of one of the major writers of the western tradition, and they will have acquired interpretive, analytical, and communication skills that will aid them in their future coursework in English and other disciplines. ENG 208 satisfies the university’s Group Requirement in the Arts and Letters category.
Gen Ed; Shakespeare

 


ENG 210               Survey of English Literature                                                                                                                                        Driscoll, William
The principal works of English literature selected to represent major writers, literary forms,  and significant currents of thought: to 1789.
Gen Ed; Elective

 


ENG 222                Introduction to the English Major                                                                                        Quigley, Mark
This is the third in a three-course sequence introducing English majors to the discipline of literary studies and British and American literature in historical perspective.  Most of our reading will focus on canonical literary figures and texts, though we will also consider some lesser known authors and works.  The course will continue to acquaint students with key literary and critical terminology as well as various methods and modes of literary history, criticism, and theory.  The third term covers the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, beginning with Romanticism and ending at the dawn of the twenty-first century.
Major Requirement

 


ENG 230               Introduction to Environmental Literature                                                                                             Wald, Sarah
Introduction to writing in the major literary genres of poetry, nonfiction, and fiction that examines the human place in the natural world.
Gen Ed; Elective

 


 ENG 241                Introduction to African American Literature                                                                     Thorsson, Courtney
This course is a survey of writings by African American authors. Studying fiction, essays, and poetry, we’ll close read representative texts to identify formal and thematic elements that characterize the African American literary tradition. We will consider how these works exemplify and complicate lived and literary identities. In other words, how do these texts fit into or defy ideas about race, gender, and class on the one hand and classifications of genre, period, and literary style on the other. We’ll study relationships among these works to uncover how they reflect on, depend on, or revise one another. We will also look for relationships between these works and other art forms, such as blues, jazz, folklore, and visual arts. The goal of this course is to help you engage with African American literature, improving your writing, reading, and critical thinking skills in the process.
Gen Ed; Multicultural; Elective

  


ENG 244               Introduction to Native American Literature                                                                                     Brown, Kirby
This introductory course in Native American literature surveys a wide array of native writing across genres, regions, periods, and nations. In addition to gaining a better understanding of and appreciation for the diversity and complexity of Native American intellectual production, you will also leave the course with a historically nuanced grasp of some of the major issues, questions, and concerns that run throughout the writing of Native America.
Gen Ed; Multicultural; Elective

 



ENG 260               Media   Aesthetics                                                                                                                                                          Claiborn, Caroline
This course aims to develop your media literacy by providing you with a precise set of critical tools for analyzing moving image texts.  Although our primary focus will be on the formal analysis of image and sound rather than media history or social issues, we will study the interplay between artistic and social conventions and the role of ideology in shaping the meaning of media texts.  We will view and critique numerous film and television clips, as well as several feature-length films.  Online group projects will enable students to shape course content by choosing media clips that illustrate concepts covered by readings and lectures.  While not oriented toward the technical or industrial aspects of media productions, the course builds skills that are beneficial to both media producers and consumers.
Elective


ENG 267              History of the Motion Picture                                                                                                                    Miller, Quinn
 This course together with 265 & 266 forms a chronological survey of the evolution of cinema as an institution and an art form. The courses can be taken individually or as parts of an integrated sequence.
Gen Ed; Elective

 


ENG 300               Introduction to Literary Criticism                                                                                                         Upton, Corbett
Various techniques and approaches to literary criticism (e.g., historical, feminist, formalist, deconstructionist, Freudian, Marxist, semiotic) and their applications.
Theory

 


ENG 313               Teen and Children’s Literature: A UO Literacy Initiative Course                                                                    Wheeler, Elizabeth
Co-req: ENG 404 Community Literacy
Explores books for young readers and their social implications, from picture books to comics and young adult novels, classics to recent bestsellers. We also go out in the community and do volunteer work with actual kids. Sites range from public schools to community gardens and homeless shelters. The required internship is 3-12 hours per week (1-4 credits), teaching and mentoring kids from babies to age 18 (your choice of site and age group).Coreq: ENG 404 Community Literacy. This course is brought to you by the UO Literacy Initiative, a service learning program of the UO English Department. 1789+; Counts for Cartoon and Comics Studies minor  and Disability Studies focus of SPED minor.
1789+

 


ENG 321               English                                                                                                                                                      2 Sections
This course covers the rise of the novel from Defoe to Austen. The 18th century ushered in a new form of literature in England: the novel. Novels took various forms, including the epistolary novel, the picaresque novel, the gothic novel, and the novel of manners. As we study examples of these novels by some of the most influential authors of the day, we will discuss how the culture of the time shaped the literature, and we will tackle the problem of creating a working definition for a genre that-from its very beginnings-was anti-conventional and diverse.
Gen Ed; 1500-1789
 


ENG 322               English Novel                                                                                                                                        O’Fallon, Kathleen
This course will focus on the fictional constructions of nation in British novels of the nineteenth century. In an era that spans massive imperial expansion and colonial rebellion, British novelists sought to explore national identity within a global context. We will discuss writers’ representations of Europe and empire, considering how these texts reflect anxieties both about “other” nations and the state of Britain itself. We will begin with Jane Austen’s depiction of British life set against a West Indian background in Mansfield Park, and move to the question of empire with Wilkie Collins’ famous detective novel The Moonstone, which figures the 1857 Indian Mutiny as hauntingly absent-yet-present. We will compare the fearful yet alluringly powerful protagonists who emerge from eastern Europe and Africa in Bram Stoker’s Dracula and H. Rider Haggard’s She. Written papers will respond to critical texts read in conjunction with the novels.
Gen Ed; 1789+
 


ENG 323               English                                                                                                                                                                                 Bellew, Paul
The rise of the novel from Conrad to the present.
Gen Ed; 1789+

 

ENG 330               Oral Controversy and Advocacy                                                                                                       Horton, Kathleen
In-depth study of the habits of research, reasoning, selection, and presentation necessary for ethical and effective oral advocacy on contested topics. Not open to freshmen. Prereq: WR 122 or equivalent.
Gen Ed; Elective


 ENG 335              Inventing Arguments                                                                                                                           Crosswhite, James
Analysis and use of patterns of reasoning derived from the disciplines of rhetoric, informal logic, cognitive science, and the theory of argumentation.
Gen Ed; Theory

ENG 360            African American Writers 1870-1920                                                                                                                          Thorsson, Courtney
In the this course, we will study African American writing from the period Charles Chesnutt called “Post-Bellum, Pre-Harlem.” As Chesnutt’s terminology suggests, some scholars think of this as a low point in African American history, a kind of gap between the ante-bellum era and the Harlem Renaissance. Historians refer to this period as “the Nadir” because of its intense racial repression and violence. The years 1870-1920 were, however, among the most fruitful for African American literary production, rivaling the Harlem Renaissance in scope, significance, and influence in the African American literary tradition. In this course you will engage in literary study, scholarly discussion, and analytical writing about literature. This course thus requires substantial reading and writing and vigorous participation. The goal of this course is to help you engage with African American literature, improving your writing, reading, and critical thinking skills in the process.
Gen Ed; 1789+, FEW

 


ENG 381               Film Media, and Culture                                                                                                                          Gopal, Sangita
This course studies works of film and media as aesthetic objects that engage with communities identified by class, gender, race, ethnicity, and sexuality.  It considers both the effects of prejudice, intolerance and discrimination on media and filmmaking practices and modes of reception that promote cultural pluralism and tolerance. It historicizes traditions of representation in film and media and analyzes works of contemporary film and media to explore the impact and evolution of these practices.  Classroom discussion will be organized around course readings, screenings and publicity (interviews, trailers, etc).  Assignments will supplement these discussions by providing opportunities to develop critical /analytical /evaluative dialogues and essays about cinematic representation.  ENG 381 satisfies the Arts and Letters group requirement by actively engaging students in the ways the discipline of film and media studies has been shaped by the study of a broad range of identity categories, including gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, and class. By requiring students to analyze and interpret cinematic representation from these perspectives, the course will promote an understanding of film as an art form that exists in relation to its various social contexts. ENG 381 also satisfies the Identity, Pluralism, and Tolerance multicultural requirement by enabling students to develop scholarly insight into the construction of collective identities in the mass media forms of film and television. It will study the effects of prejudice, intolerance and discrimination on mainstream media. Students will study the ways representational conventions, such as stereotypes, have resulted from filmmaking traditions that have excluded voices from varying social and cultural standpoints. The course will also consider filmmaking practices and modes of reception that promote cultural pluralism and tolerance.
Gen Ed; Multicultural; Elective

 

ENG 391                American Novel                                                                                                                                                              Platt, Daniel
In this course, we will examine formal strategies and thematic concerns of 19th century American novels. Using close reading and historical context, we’ll investigate these questions: How do our authors imagine Americanness? What are the possibilities and limits of the novel form and how are they tied to national identity? How do these novels construct race, class, and gender? How do ethnic American and women writers shape this tradition? This course is designed to help you engage in literary study and intellectual conversation. It is thus an opportunity to hone your critical faculty through scholarly discussion and analytical writing about literature.
Gen Ed; 1789+


ENG 399               Sp St: Space & Place iin Early Mondern Literature                                                                              Nance, Jessie
This course will bring setting to the forefront, as it takes an ecocritical perspective of early modern texts by authors such as Thomas More, Edmund Spenser, and William Shakespeare. We will examine how authors use text to create space, place, landscape, and environment. This course will also consider the ways in which characters interact with their landscapes and settings and how examination of environment adds to our understanding of character. Ultimately, this course is concerned with applying the methods of environmental studies to sixteenth- and seventeenth-century literature as a way explore what these works reveal about early modern English attitudes towards environment. Along the way, we will investigate how the representations of nature in these early modern texts influence modern attitudes toward landscape and environment.
1500-1789

 

ENG 407               Senior Seminar: Senses of Place in American Lit                                                                           Rossi, William
This course will explore how U.S. writers have registered their own and their characters’ senses of place and displacement in fiction and nonfiction.  By comparing works set in different geographical regions, written in different voices, and using diverse narrative techniques, we’ll study how the uneven dislocations and unleashed potentials of modernity have shaped place experience in literature.  The journey will take us from Walt Whitman’s Brooklyn ferry rides in the mid-nineteenth century to Karen Tei Yamashita’s utopian Los Angeles freeway occupation in the twenty-first.
1789+

 


ENG 410               Chaucer & Dante                                                                                                                                    Ginsberg, Warren
In this course we will read selections from the Divine Comedy and the Canterbury Tales. Dante and Chaucer were both interested in sin and salvation, in faith and disbelief, in the mind and the will, in men and in women, in fathers and sons, in the city and the countryside, in love, in the imagination, in the reach and purpose of poetry. Yet Chaucer, who knew the Comedy, represented these interests in ways that greatly differ from those of Dante. We will explore these differences and other topics in the class. Professor Regina Psaki, from the Department of Romance Languages, may join us for our discussions of Dante. We will read the Comedy in translation, Chaucer in Middle English. Requirements: one shorter and one longer paper comparing the authors.
Pre-1500

 

ENG 412               Literary Editing                                                                                                                                                  Witte, John
In the Literary Editing seminar we will explore the principles and practice of editing contemporary literature. Students will form editorial groups, read and evaluate submissions, and engage in the critical discussion of works being considered for publication. Each week will feature an editing roundtable with a visiting author, editor, agent, or publisher. We will develop over the course of the term viable methods of evaluation, and apply those methods to the hands-on editing of poetry and fiction. The students will acquire professional skills in editing and publishing, critical thinking, and consensus-building.
Elective

 


ENG 423               The Age of Beowulf                                                                                                                                 Clark, Stephanie
This course explores a broad selection of texts from the three cultures inhabiting the British Isles in the early Middle Ages: the Irish, the Anglo-Saxons, and the Danes. The central text in each unit is an epic, the Táin bo Culainge, the Saga of the Volsungs, and Beowulf, but we will also read founding myths, religious texts, and shorter poetry (lyric or elegy) from each of these cultures. Medieval literature often seems strange, but it is highly rewarding.  It can train students to notice and understand ways of thinking alien to that of modern society. This class will focus on gaining familiarity with the conventions of a variety of medieval genres and on accessing the concerns of the literature in its context while allowing students room to explore their own thematic interests within medieval literature.
Pre-1500

 


ENG 430               Old English III:  Dragons in Beowulf                                                                                                  Clark, Stephanie
Beowulf (Old English III).  A study of a significant part of the Old English epic Beowulf, with attention to issues of grammar, vocabulary, and dragons.  In Old English, not in translation.  Prereqs:  Old English I and Old English II (ENG 428 and 429).
Elective

 


ENG 442               Milton                                                                                                                                                                Bovilsky, Lara
Students in ENG 442 read and discuss Milton’s poetry (and possibly some of his prose).  Students will become acquainted with Milton’s political and literary careers and the issues to which he devotes particular concern, and with ways in which Milton’s work has been seen as important by his readers.  Students will leave the course having read extensively from the works of one of the major writers of the western tradition and will be able to generate their own arguments about interpreting the ethical, political, and religious content in Milton’s work.  There will be weekly readings, in addition to which students will be asked to perform one close reading exercise and 2 essays
1500-1789

ENG 469               Top Animals in Lit                                                                                                                                                                LeMenager, Stephanie

1789 +

ENG 475               Modern Poetry                                                                                                                                                                   McKeown, Andrew
20th Century British and American poetry with emphasis on the modernist period, 1910-
1789+

 


ENG 479               Major Authors: Pivotal Writers of the Restoration: John Dryden and Aphra                    Dugaw, Dianne
The late seventeenth-century (1650-1700) was a watershed moment in British literary and cultural history, a bridge between the early modern world and the modern era. In this course students will study this moment in British literary history through examination of two pivotal authors who wrote with great awareness of each other: John Dryden, and Aphra Behn.  We will consider five themes threading through their works:  (1) the crisis of civil war and questions of monarchy and rule; (2) the Catholic-Protestant divisions of Britain, with their ideological, cultural and ethnic implications; (3) the new empirical science against the backdrop of European exploration and discovery; (4) an increasingly mercantilist and capitalist system of English colonization and trade; and (5) changing conceptions of sexuality and gender, particularly as women took up the forms of literary expression.  We will consider important works of poetry, prose, and drama, including Dryden’s All for Love, and Behn’s The Rover.  Work for the course will include a midterm exam, a reading journal, a paper, and a final essay.
1500-1789


ENG 485               Television Studies                                                                                                                                         Miller, Quinn
Study of television’s institutional contents and representational practices, including such television genres as serials news, and reality TV.  Offered alternate years.
Elective


ENG 486               New Media & Digital Culture                                                                                                                        Fickle, Tara
Chess. Sudoku. World of Warcraft. Battleship. Candy Crush. Basketball. Roulette. These are all things we call games – but what exactly do they all have in common? This course introduces students to the basics of games as a cultural phenomenon. Beginning with a seemingly obvious question which has frustrated generations of scholars and theorists – what is a game? – we will go on to examine games in terms of function, purpose, mechanics, design, and audience. Students will learn how to talk about games and then how to put that knowledge to work in designing their own games. This course satisfies the Department’s Theory requirement and may satisfy an elective requirement for the New Media & Culture Certificate. A draft version of the syllabus is available at the bottom of this page: https://ficklet.wordpress.com/teaching/current-courses/.
Theory


ENG 494               Reasoning, Speaking,  Writing                                                                                                                      Gage, John
Application of advance study in argumentation theory, particularly procedural standards of rationality developed in recent argumentation studies, to selected public policy controversies.
Elective


ENG 496               Topic: Gender and Global Cinema                                                                                                                             Gopal, Sangita
Critical analysis of film and television texts from a feminist perspective.
Theory


 


WR 320                 Scientific & Technical Writing                                                                                                                        2 Sections
WR 320 emphasizes the content, form, and style of scientific, professional, and technical writing, including reports, proposals, instructions, correspondence, and the use of graphics and documentation. Students will learn the conventions of discourse in these areas and how they result from different kinds of scientific and technical modes of inquiry. Students will apply this awareness to writing in academic as well as vocational contexts. Prereq: Completion of the University Writing Requirement and upper-division standing.
Elective


WR 321                 Business Communication                                                                                                                            Boscha, Tina
WR 321 offers practice in writing and analyzing communication common to business, industry, and related professions. Students will develop a critical awareness of the conventions of discourse in these areas and how they result from interpersonal and organizational contexts encountered in these fields. As aspects of such business writing conventions, this course pays close attention to logical development and stylistic and format choices. The knowledge gained is applicable to academic as well as vocational situations. Prereq: Completion of the University Writing Requirement and upper-division standing.
Elective



WR 423                 Advanced Composition                                                                                                                      Horton, Kathleen

Emphasis on critical thinking skills and rhetorical strategies for advanced written reasoning in different academic disciplines. Prereq: completion of UO writing requirement; junior standing.
Elective



FLR 255                 Folklore & US Popular Culture                                                                                                               Wojcik, Daniel
Introduces students to the theories and methods used in the study of folklore and popular culture; examines a diversity of approaches to the description and analysis of “common culture,” including popular narratives, legends, rituals, ethnic and gender stereotypes, carnivalesque events, fan cultures, subcultures, DIY, and the commodification of youth culture. Special focus on the ways that folklore and popular culture reflect and shape dominant ideologies, and how people may use mass cultural products to create new, personal, and sometimes subversive meanings.
Gen Ed; Multicultural; Elective


FLR 370                 Folklore & Sexuality                                                                                                                                       Gilman, Lisa
Intersections between folklore and sexuality provide an entry point for examining contemporary social issues relating to sexuality, including sexual identities, courting practices, sexism, pride, violence, body image issues, and resistance.
Gen. Ed, Multicultural; FEW


FLR 410/510                 Visionary Experience                                                                                                                               Wojcik, Daniel
Introduces students to the research questions and theoretical models used by scholars to examine visionary experiences and otherworldly encounters  as expressed throughout a range of traditions and within various cultural contexts.  Topics include shamanism, religious revelation, apparitions, out-of body journeys, hallucinations, spiritual possession, night terror experiences, apocalyptic prophecies, dissociative states, and visionary art.
FEW
 


FLR 410/510                 The Medieval Feast                                                                                                                                    Bayless, Martha
In this course we’ll study the entire breadth of late medieval life, centered on a particular occasion in a particular time and place: a feast held in York, England, in 1483. We’ll look at the literature and meaning of medieval feasts, reading and experiencing texts from romances to cookbooks, incorporating other aspects of medieval life such as clothing and entertainment, and culminating in an actual reenactment of the feast.
FEW


FLR 483/583                 Folklore and the British Isles                                                                                                          Dugaw, Dianne
This course traces ethnicity, cultural interaction, and forms of folkloristic expression in the British Isles and Ireland. Britain and Ireland possess a complex cultural history. Beginning with the prehistoric Celts, we will trace interactions and identities of historically documented base cultures in the region, especially as their cultural legacies have endured. The course focuses on (1) deep structures of myth, belief, and worldview from the past; and (2) persisting traditions and cultural practices. We will examine such forms of folklore as myths, stories, material culture, worship, ritual, belief, music, song, dance, drama, and custom. We will consider British folklore up to the present day in the context of community & individual values and arts.
FEW



PHIL 199               Special Studies: Memory in Literature & Philosophy                                             Alfano, Veronica & Alfano, Mark
How – and why – do we remember the past, even when doing so is painful?  In this course, we will ask what it means to nostalgically recall childhood days, to mourn loved ones, and to publicly recognize those who have died tragically (such as victims of the Holocaust and the 9/11 terrorist attacks).  In order to forgive wrongs, must we also forget them?  Do our memories ultimately determine our identities?  We’ll address these questions and more through careful examination of literary texts that span the genres of poem, short story, novella, graphic novel, and play, as well as philosophical texts ranging from ancient Greece to the present day.
Elective



ENVS 410                Nature in Popular Culture                                             Wald, Sarah
This course examines the ways nature is represented in advertisements, films, television, and popular music. It pays particular attention to race, gender, and sexuality.
Elective



Creative Writing course descriptions can be found at http://pages.uoregon.edu/crwrweb/courses/.