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University of Oregon

Welcome to the Department of English at the University of Oregon. Our nearly 50 full-time faculty members are committed to offering students a broad foundation in traditional British, American, and Anglophone literary studies, as well as intensive coursework in interdisciplinary studies, emerging media, and current critical methodologies.  Learn more about the people and programs of the English Department by exploring our website, or contact us via email.

                                              

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News

Summer 2017 university & major requirement-satisfying ENG courses with open seats!

10349944_425902167556903_3610227624159589777_nThis summer, ENG is offering classic and new summer courses. There is still room in five university and major requirement-satisfying courses.

ENG 105: Intro to Literature: Drama (CRN: 42388), William Fogarty. Gen Ed (A&L); Major II: Lower-Division Elective

Drama is a literary art. In this course, we will focus on the literary aspects of seven plays (more…)

ENG Research and Writing Internship Application Deadline 5/19

10349944_425902167556903_3610227624159589777_nIf you are interested in participating in the ENG Research and Writing Internship, please submit your letter of interest to Dr. Upton (cupton@uoregon.edu) by Friday, May 19 at 5:00pm.

Your letter of interest should include the following:

  • Why you are interested?
  • What you hope to gain from participation?
  • What level of participation can you commit to during 2017-2018?

(more…)

2017 English Commencement

graduation cap

The English Department will be holding its 2017 commencement ceremony 12:30 P.M., Monday, June 19.  Please fill out the form at http://english.uoregon.edu/2017-english-commencement by 11:59 P.M., May 18 to have your name included in the English Department Commencement Program.

Congratulations, graduates!

Events

ENG 2017-2018 Week of Welcome Events

Sep 18Sep 22

10349944_425902167556903_3610227624159589777_nBeginning September 18, 2017, the University of Oregon hosts a number of Week of Welcome (WOW) activities and programs before classes begin to introduce students to our campus community.

Opening our WOW activities, UO English will hold advising sessions for international and domestic undergraduates, respectively. During these sessions, students will learn about UO university and major requirements and register for fall classes.

The Composition Program will kick off its annual staff meeting and Composition Conference, which will run through Thursday, September 21. (more…)

Features

People (view all)

Joel Ekdahl

Profile PicJoel Ekdahl (BA 2015) was valedictorian for the English Department’s class of 2015. This is the text of his commencement speech delivered to his English peers at the 2015 English Department Commencement on the 15th of June 2015.

I would like to start by doing something that we as English majors so often do and that is to challenge an assumption. (more…)

Programs (view all)

The University of Oregon Literacy Initiative

The University of Oregon Literacy Initiative is a community-based education program of the UO English Department. UOLI was founded in 1998. A college student in a UOLI course completes an internship that dovetails with the course’s curriculum. Practical service in the community enriches academic learning in the classroom. Students can choose from a wide variety of community partners, including K-12 schools, the juvenile detention center, the Boys and Girls Club, the CTL Reading Clinic, Nearby Nature, and Mt. Pisgah Arboretum. (more…)

Faculty Books (view all)

whalan.great war

The Great War and the Culture of the New Negro

Author: Mark Whalan

This is the first book to explore the wide-ranging significance of World War One to the culture of the Harlem Renaissance. Reading authors such as Langston Hughes, Nella Larsen, Alain Locke, James Weldon Johnson, and W.E.B. Du Bois, the book argues that the war served as a crucial event conditioning African American cultural understandings of masculinity, memory, and nationality in the 1920s and after.