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Posts under tag: Feminism Studies

October 1, 2013

Women’s Work and Black Cultural Nationalism: Professor Courtney Thorsson discusses her new book on the WURD

Professor Courtney Thorsson discusses her new book, Women’s Work: Nationalism and Contemporary African American Women’s Novels, with Philadelphia’s 900 am WURD. In her book, Thorsson reconsiders the gender, genre, and geography of African American nationalism as she explores the aesthetic history of African American writing by women. (more…)

Women’s Work: Nationalism and Contemporary African American Women’s Novels

Thorsson Women's Work

Author:  Courtney Thorsson

In Women’s Work, Courtney Thorsson reconsiders the gender, genre, and geography of African American nationalism as she explores the aesthetic history of African American writing by women. Building on and departing from the Black Arts Movement, the literary fiction of such writers as Toni Cade Bambara, Paule Marshall, Gloria Naylor, Ntozake Shange, and Toni Morrison employs a cultural nationalism—practiced by their characters as “women’s work”—that defines a distinct contemporary literary movement, demanding attention to the continued relevance of nation in post–Black Arts writing. Identifying five forms of women’s work as organizing, dancing, mapping, cooking, and inscribing, Thorsson shows how these writers reclaimed and revised cultural nationalism to hail African America.

June 7, 2012

Unruly Girls Unrepentant Mothers

Author:  Kathleen Rowe Karlyn
Unruly Girls, Unrepentant Mothers, a companion to Karlyn’s The Unruly Woman (1995), studies how popular culture and contemporary feminism inform each other.   It asks whether today’s seemingly materialistic and apolitical girls have turned their backs on the feminism of their mothers or are redefining unruliness for a new age.

 

April 23, 2012

Women Travel Writers and the Language of Aesthetics: 1716 – 1818

Author:  Elizabeth Bohls

Elizabeth Bohls’s Women Travel Writers and the Languages of Aesthetics; 1716-1818 expands our awareness of women’s intellectual presence in Romantic literature and suggests Romanticism’s sources might be at the peripheries of empire rather than at its center.