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April 12, 2013

The Green Breast of the New World

Author:  Louise Westling

In searching American literary landscapes for what they can reveal about our attitudes toward nature and gender, The Green Breast of the New World considers symbolic landscapes in twentieth-century American fiction, the characters who inhabit those landscapes, and the gendered traditions that can influence the figuration of both of these fictional elements.

October 18, 2012

The Memoir of Lieutenant Dumont, 1715-1747

Translated by Gordon Sayre.

Jean-François Benjamin Dumont de Montigny (1696-1760) was the youngest son of a Paris magistrate, who was given a commission as a lieutenant in the French colonial military, and spent eighteen years in Louisiana. He witnessed the founding of New Orleans, battles with the Chickasaw and Natchez Indians, and finally established himself as a farmer. His manuscript memoir, held at the Newberry Library in Chicago, was published in French in 2008 and here in English translation for the first time. A picaresque narrative of danger and misadventure, it is among the most powerful autobiographies of colonial America.

June 25, 2012

The Egoist

Editor: Richard Stevenson

The Egoist is George Meredith’s comic masterpiece, in which he takes the traditional marriage plot of English domestic fiction and turns it on its head.  This edition by Richard Stevenson includes an introduction  that provides context for the novel from Meredith’s own  life, his theory of comedy, the ‘woman question,’ and Darwinian  biology.  The appendices include comments on The Egoist from Meredith’s letters, contemporary reviews, Victorian tracts on feminine conduct and education along with extracts from J. S. Mill’s The Subjection of Women and Darwin’s On the Origin of Species and The Descent of Man.

June 18, 2012

Split-Gut Song

Author:  Karen J. Ford

Karen Jackson Ford’s  Split-Gut Song: Jean Toomer and the Poetics of Modernity investigates how Toomer and other modernist writers equated certain poetic forms with specific racial or national identities.

Gender and the Poetics of Excess

Author:  Karen J. Ford
Karen Jackson Ford’s Gender and the Poetics of Excess explores the extravagant writing styles of American women poets who simultaneously parody the stereotype of the gabby female and demand a place for their words in a literary tradition that is inhospitable to women writers.

June 7, 2012

The Letters of Jean Toomer

Author: Mark Whalan

Jean Toomer was a major figure of the Harlem Renaissance and in the  twentieth-century modernist movement, and this represents the first-ever  annotated collection of his correspondence. The letters included in the  volume were written in the five years surrounding Toomer’s publication  of his seminal work, Cane, and lend unique insight into the life,  aesthetics, politics, and work of a central figure in American  literature of the early twentieth century. (more…)

Race, Manhood, and Modernism in America

Author:  Mark Whalan.

This book offers the first extended comparison between American writers Sherwood Anderson (1876-1941) and Jean Toomer (1894-1967), and their development of unique visions of how race, gender, and region would be transformed as America entered an age of mass consumerism and rural decline.

The Great War and the Culture of the New Negro

Author: Mark Whalan

This is the first book to explore the wide-ranging significance of World War One to the culture of the Harlem Renaissance. Reading authors such as Langston Hughes, Nella Larsen, Alain Locke, James Weldon Johnson, and W.E.B. Du Bois, the book argues that the war served as a crucial event conditioning African American cultural understandings of masculinity, memory, and nationality in the 1920s and after.

American Culture in the 1910s

Author: Mark Whalan

This book offers a cultural survey of this decade, dominated by the horrors of the first modern war, but which also witnessed the flowering of modernism, the birth of Hollywood, and the rise of progressive interpretations of culture and society. Chapters focus on fiction and poetry; fine art and photography; cinema and vaudeville; music, dance, and theater; and a conclusion which explores the impact of the First World War on cultural understandings of nationalism, citizenship, and propaganda.

Triangulations

Author:  David Vázquez

David Vázquez’s book Triangulations: Narrative Strategies for Navigating Latino Identity, published by the University of Minnesota Press, reveals how Latino autobiographical texts challenge mainstream notions of individual identity and national belonging in the United States.

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