Major II: Lower-Division Elective

Lower-division Elective courses allow students to choose (or “elect”) courses or faculty specific to their own developing interests, enabling them thereby to shape their own educational experience.  Major II students can also use one lower-division elective to fulfill the Writing Requirement with ENG 209 The Craft of the Sentence.

12150

Actual reading lists vary significantly depending on the expertise and teaching philosophy of the instructor, but all sections of the course offer students a broad introduction to the study of literary fiction. Whether readings focus on the stories and novels of major writers or on works from a... (read more)

12151

Actual reading lists vary significantly depending on the expertise and teaching philosophy of the instructor, but all sections of the course offer students a broad introduction to the study of literary fiction. Whether readings focus on the stories and novels of major writers or on works from a... (read more)

12152

Actual reading lists vary significantly depending on the expertise and teaching philosophy of the instructor, but all sections of the course offer students a broad introduction to the study of literary fiction. Whether readings focus on the stories and novels of major writers or on works from a... (read more)

12153

This course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of the formal properties of poetry in English. Through careful analysis of poems by major writers, students will be challenged to explain not only what a given poem might mean to its readers, but also how a poem communicates... (read more)

12154

Shankman, Steven

We will read foundational works from three different ancient cultures: China, Greece, and Israel. We will pay particular attention to the question of the kinds of values that these foundational works were meant to instill in their ancient audiences. What does each culture have to say about... (read more)

12158

Laskaya, C. Anne

Listening rigorously and deeply, inquiring into issues and topics of importance to our communities, and speaking effectively are key elements that assist our lives in any relationship, team-task, and group.  They are also crucial for a democracy to function and to improve.  Course readings,... (read more)

12160

Dawson, Brent

Students read, discuss, and critique Shakespeare's early comedies and tragedies. Plays covered generally include (but are not limited to) A Mid-Summer Night's Dream, The Merchant of Venice, Henry IV (Part One), Richard II, Henry V, Julius Caesar... (read more)

12163

Sayre, Gordon

The goal of this course is to learn to analyze the structure of English sentences, or syntax. The method is sentence diagramming, a technique for identifying and separating the elements of a sentence, the subject, object, verb, conjunctions and clauses, in a graphic arrangement. We will only... (read more)

12165

Whalan, Mark

This course is a survey of writings by African American authors. Studying fiction, essays, and poetry, we'll close read representative texts to identify formal and thematic elements that characterize the African American literary tradition. We will consider how these works exemplify and... (read more)

12176

This course provides an introduction to the analysis of comics and graphic narratives in terms of their poetics, genres, forms, history, and the academic discipline of Comics Studies. Our multifaceted examination will balance close reading with in-depth research and analysis of the development... (read more)

12497

An introduction to contemporary folklore studies, with emphasis on the meanings of stories, rituals, festivals, body art, subcultures, the supernatural, street art, Internet folklore, and other forms of vernacular expression as these relate to a diversity of social identities and cultural... (read more)

16064

Actual reading lists vary significantly depending on the expertise and teaching philosophy of the instructor, but all sections of the course offer students a broad introduction to the study of literary fiction. Whether readings focus on the stories and novels of major writers or on works from a... (read more)

16078

Simnitt, Emily

What does it mean to be at home? How does it feel to lose one's home?

And how do ideas of home and homelessness shape our sense of self or security? This course builds on these questions to look at a collection of literary works that focus explicitly on the idea of home in American culture... (read more)

16455

Brown, Kirby

In 1968, Kiowa writer N. Scott Momaday's House Made of Dawn was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for American literature. Momaday's award signaled for many the “arrival” of Native authors to the American literary scene, and ushered in an unprecedented era of Native literary production widely... (read more)

16456

Freinkel, Lisa

The major plays in chronological order with emphasis on the later plays beginning with “Twelfth Night.”

(read more)
16778

This course is an introduction to film and media studies and various methods of critical analysis. In this course, we will see that there are many productive ways of thinking about movies and many approaches we can use to analyze them. These approaches include the study of narrative structure,... (read more)

16827

This course provides an introduction to the analysis of form and style in cinema and related media, focusing on narrative, mise-en-scène, cinematography, editing, and sound. This course aims to develop your media literacy by providing you with a precise set of critical tools for analyzing moving... (read more)

16840

This course provides an introduction to the analysis of form and style in cinema and related media, focusing on narrative, mise-en-scène, cinematography, editing, and sound. This course aims to develop your media literacy by providing you with a precise set of critical tools for analyzing moving... (read more)

16947

LeMenager, Stephanie

Time travel through the history of the science fiction genre from the early modern era to the current moment as we learn about how Sci Fi came to be what is arguably the most socially engaged form of fiction. We'll consider Sci Fi that draws on the hard sciences, on the social sciences, and... (read more)

16950

As an introductory survey, this course emphasizes the formal, thematic, and cultural diversity of Latinx literature. We will read novels, poetry, short stories, and comics, among other media, by authors from a range of identities—including Mexican American, Central American, Cuban American, and... (read more)

16960

This course provides an introduction to the analysis of form and style in cinema and related media, focusing on narrative, mise-en-scène, cinematography, editing, and sound. This course aims to develop your media literacy by providing you with a precise set of critical tools for analyzing moving... (read more)

40801

Myers, Kate

Madness, truth, honor, pity—these are a few of the concepts Shakespeare explores in his earliest plays. We will scrutinize the representations of these ideas and others that emerge in plots of political intrigue, tyranny, rebellion, and vengeance. Working within this frame, we will attempt to... (read more)

40890

Bayless, Martha

This course is an examination of the period often considered the most “magical,” the Middle Ages. Looking at the practices of medieval western Europe, particularly Britain, we will examine how medieval culture defined magic, what they hoped to achieve by practicing (or forbidding) magic, and how... (read more)

42073

Introduces students to the theories and methods used in the study of folklore and popular culture; examines a diversity of approaches to the description and analysis of “common culture,” including popular narratives, legends, rituals, ethnic and gender stereotypes, carnivalesque events, fan... (read more)

42421

Gopal, Sangita

This course will build on our abilities to watch, analyze and write about media objects, particularly film. We will learn to recognize, define and elaborate on various kinds of cinema (fiction, documentary etc.), genres (musical, western, horror etc.), elements of narrative (script, plot, point... (read more)

42422

Rust, Stephen

“Survey of U.S. Cinema": We will screen a sampling of films associated with U.S./American cinema through its relatively short history since the sound era—-beginning with important “genres,” progressing into cinematic “modes,” and ultimately examining how movies in our national context reflect... (read more)

42454

Brown, Kirby

In 1968, Kiowa writer N. Scott Momaday's House Made of Dawn was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for American literature. Momaday's award signaled for many the “arrival” of Native authors to the American literary scene, and ushered in an unprecedented era of Native literary production widely... (read more)

42457

This class is conceived as an introduction to the art of comics, and to the methodologies of the new academic discipline of Comics Studies. Course content will vary from term to term, according to the specialist interests of the individual instructor, within the following parameters. Students... (read more)

32001

Rovak, Angela

This course will focus on the literary representations of black girlhood. In ENG 104: Introduction to Fiction we will read the stories of young black women as they move through the difficult transition from childhood to adulthood. We will read novels and short stories that show a diversity of... (read more)

32002

Floyd, Courtney

In English 104, “Archetypes and Anarchy,” we will explore the basic elements of fiction via one of its most enduring forms: the fairy tale. As the course title indicates, we will begin by considering the archetype, a concept derived from Jungian psychology which refers to “a pervasive idea,... (read more)

32005

Graman, Claire

Today it’s easier than ever to access media through streaming services like Netflix, Hulu, and Amazon Prime, yet their selection of films made before 1980 is surprisingly sparse. Where are these classic films and why should we care? This course will introduce you to cinema studies, including... (read more)

32007

Crosswhite, James

While the primary emphasis of this course will be students’ frequent practice and evaluation of their own public speaking, we will also discuss theories of rhetoric; the identity, characteristics, and relationship of speaker (self) and audience (other); the importance of listening as an aspect... (read more)

32010

Myers, Kate

Late Shakespeare

In self-reflexive characters we might categorize as lovers, fools, and madmen, the later plays of Shakespeare confront the political and social concerns of his original audiences, concerns that continue to challenge us today, including issues of gender, race, class, and... (read more)

32013

Thorsson, Courtney

This course is a survey of writings by African American authors. Studying fiction, essays, and poetry, we will read representative texts to consider whether there are specific formal and thematic elements that characterize an African American literary tradition. We will consider how these texts... (read more)

32015

Media Aesthetics (ENG 260) teaches the vocabulary required to formally analyze cinema and related media, with an emphasis on narrative, mise-en-scène, cinematography, editing, and sound. Students will learn to identify, define, and apply key vocabulary used to describe and analyze the aesthetics... (read more)

32016

Gopal, Sangita

ENG 267, the third of three courses that study the historical evolution of cinema as an institution and as an art form from its origin, covers the time period from the “end” of the studio system in the 1960s to the present day. It may be taken individually or as part of a series (with ENG 265... (read more)

35961

LaRiviere, Katie Jo

This course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of the formal properties of poetry in English. Through careful analysis of poems by major writers, students will be challenged to explain not only what a given poem might mean to its readers, but also how a poem communicates... (read more)

35962

Brown, Kirby

In 1968, Kiowa writer N. Scott Momaday’s House Made of Dawn was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for American literature. Momaday’s award signaled for many the “arrival” of Native authors to the American literary scene, and ushered in an unprecedented era of Native literary production widely... (read more)

36014

Wonham, Henry

This course is an introduction to drama, one of the major genres in literary studies. Students will read, discuss, and analyze plays from a variety of periods and national traditions in order to become familiar with the major styles, techniques, and conventions that characterize dramatic... (read more)

36784

Li, David

Reading Asian American texts as a form of cultural representation, the class will be concerned with the following:

  1. Where is Asian America? What are its geographical, social, and epistemological boundaries?
  2. What is Asian American? Is it a racial concept, cultural construct,... (read more)
22712

Wheeler, Elizabeth (Betsy)

Why do stories matter? In this class we will read novels of childhood and adolescence, both fantasy and realistic, and compare them to the stories that matter in our own lives and families. The novels come from India, England, South Korea, and the United States. By the end of the course you... (read more)

22713

Bostrom, Margaret

This course will address a theme within contemporary U.S. experimental literature. Course readings may include graphic novels, novels in verse, micro fiction, or narrative video games. We will address foundational questions about the nature of prose narrative by reading texts that push the... (read more)

22714

Rovak, Angela

This course will focus on the literary representations of black girlhood. In ENG 104: Introduction to Fiction we will read the stories of young black women as they move through the difficult transition from childhood to adulthood. We will read novels and short stories that show a diversity of... (read more)

22717

Saunders, Ben

This course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of the formal properties of poetry in English. Through careful analysis of poems by major writers, students will be challenged to explain not only what a given poem might mean to its readers, but also how a poem communicates... (read more)

22719

Graman, Claire

This course will introduce you to cinema studies, including history, culture, analysis, theory, aesthetics, and production, through the lens of genre. Why are there certain genres of film and what do they say about our culture? By examining classic and contemporary films within the western,... (read more)

22723

LeRud, Lizzy

This course explores the art of public speaking as grounded in theories of rhetoric, especially those pertaining to the relationship of a speaker to an audience, the importance of listening as an aspect of speaking, and the socioethical contexts of public discourse. Assignments and activities... (read more)

22726

Pyle, Forest

This course, which focuses on four of the later plays of Shakespeare’s career, is designed as an introduction to the language, themes, contexts, and implications of Shakespeare’s most mature work. Though our close reading of these plays will lead us to consider any number of the many topics... (read more)

22727

Curry, Elizabeth

This course will introduce students to literature that depicts ‘the environment’ in various ways: as resplendent landscape, as increasingly industrialized space, as ecologically compromised animal habitat, and as chemically altered agricultural swath. This course will read fiction, nonfiction,... (read more)

22729

Miller, Quinn

This course develops critical reading and research skills. It introduces technical vocabulary for analyzing the form of moving image texts in the study of media aesthetics. We address material objects and cultural history related to media technology, looking at print culture, audiobook, still... (read more)

22730

Gopal, Sangita

This course aims to develop your media literacy by providing you with a precise set of critical tools for analyzing moving image texts. Although our primary focus will be on the formal analysis of image and sound rather than media history or social issues, we will study the interplay between... (read more)

22731

Rust, Stephen

This is the second course in a three-term sequence that studies the evolution of cinema as an art form and economic and cultural institution. English 266 continues from the end of the silent film era early 1960s. The aim of the course is to develop interpretive skills relevant to the study of... (read more)

26577

Wald, Sarah

We will explore issues related to food production and consumption through fictional and non-fictional representations of farmers and farmworkers in contemporary U.S. literature and culture. We will look at food production, food distribution, and food access through the lens of agriculture,... (read more)

26808

Shankman, Steven

English 108 is the second quarter of a year-long survey of World Literature, between antiquity and the modern period. In European literature, this period includes the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. Rather than sample a smattering of various texts from this period, we will read a single great... (read more)

26825

Sayre, Gordon

The goal of this course is to learn to analyze the structure of English sentences, or syntax. The method is sentence diagramming, a technique for identifying and separating the elements of a sentence, the subject, object, verb, conjunctions and clauses, in a graphic arrangement. We will only... (read more)

26826

Warren, Joyce Pualani

What story does your body tell? Beyond the assumptions others may make based on physical appearance, or what you might convey through adornment, what narrative does your body perpetuate? The Proto Polynesian word “tatau” (tattoo) is both a noun, the physical mark inscribed on the body, and a... (read more)

26827

Li, David

This class is a sampling of American writing by its ethnic and racial minority writers. Generically speaking, we shall devote ourselves to prose fiction and non-fiction.

(read more)
27672

Simnitt, Emily

What does it mean to be at home? How does it feel to lose one's home? And how do ideas of home and homelessness shape our sense of self or security? This course builds on these questions to look at a collection of literary works that focus explicitly on the idea of home in American culture. We'... (read more)

12126

McGuffie, Allison

Movies are often dismissed as mere popular entertainment. But the very pervasiveness of audio-visual media in our lives demands that we look more carefully at these cultural products. In fact, an entire field of study has developed to investigate the history and significance of moving picture... (read more)

0

Course Description: This course will build on our abilities to watch, analyze and write about media objects, particularly film. We will learn to recognize, define and elaborate on various kinds of cinema (fiction, documentary, etc), genres (musical, western, crime, etc), and elements of... (read more)

0

Li, David

As indicated by the title, this class is an introduction to the literary production by American authors of Asian descent. We shall read classic texts from this ethnic American literary tradition to understand the unique histories that shape it and to appreciate the people’s struggles and... (read more)

0

Course Description:
This course is a survey of writings by African American authors of the 18th, 19th, 20th and 21st centuries. We will study a range of genres, including fiction, poetry, drama, autobiography, and nonfiction, from the earliest published work by African Americans through to... (read more)

0

Pyle, Forest; Filo, Gina

Description This course, which focuses on four of the later plays of Shakespeare’s career, is designed as an introduction to the language, themes, contexts, and implications of Shakespeare’s most mature work. Though our close reading of these plays will lead us to consider any number of the many... (read more)

0

Ever since The Blair Witch Project (1999) was marketed as “found footage” documenting the last few days of missing—and presumably dead—film students, the horror genre has been dominated by an endless barrage of films pretending to be discovered footage of actual events. These films have been so... (read more)

0

Cheney, Zachary

English 110 is a lower-division elective that satisfies the Arts & Letters group
requirement by critically examining film and media objects. This incarnation of the
course is titled, “Survey of US Cinema.” We will screen a sampling of films associated
with US/American cinema... (read more)

0

Shankman, Steven

English 109 is the third quarter of a year-long survey of World Literature. In the third quarter we read works from the modern period. What does it mean to be a modern? The word “modern” is commonly used to mean “new,” and most often it refers to our own era. It is a well-established practice... (read more)

0

Clark, Stephanie

Reading two novels, including John Crowley’s classic post-apocalyptic fantasy novel Engine Summer, and a variety of short stories, ENG 104 addresses basic questions about the nature of prose narrative and the interrelated activities of reading, writing, and interpretation. Most of the course... (read more)

32037

Upton, Corbett

Course Description: This course offers students a broad introduction to the study of literary fiction. Focusing on
the works of major writers, students develop analytical skills that will allow them to think, write, and speak
intelligently about fiction. The course addresses basic... (read more)

32056

Gopal, Sangita

This is the final segment of a three-term sequence that studies how cinema evolved as an institution and and an industrial art form. English 267 covers the period 1950s to the present. The aim of the course is explore the recent history of global cinema and develop the critical and analytic... (read more)

36586

Wheeler, Elizabeth (Betsy)

This genre course revolves around key figures of fantasy literature such as mythical
beasts, bodily transformation, portals, talking animals, wizards, magical objects,
quests, and world-building. Each one of these figures is a motif: “a unit within literature
that proves so useful... (read more)

36587

Wood, Mary

This course will examine the development of autobiography as a literary genre from the spiritual narratives of medieval women mystics to the graphic memoirs of twenty-first century writers. Along the way we will consider a range of autobiographical forms, including slave narrative, immigrant... (read more)

36657

Tanner, Rachel

This course provides an introduction to the academic discipline of Comics Studies, which focuses on
comics as a form of literary production and asks questions about how and why comics are written and
read. You will be exposed to a variety of comic-art forms (the newspaper strip, the... (read more)

22202

Wheeler, Elizabeth (Betsy); Floyd, Courtney

Why do stories matter? In this class we will read novels of childhood and adolescence, both
fantasy and realistic, and compare them to the stories that matter in our own lives and
families. The novels come from India, England, South Korea, and the United States. By the
end of the... (read more)

22230

Curry, Elizabeth

This course will introduce students to changing depictions of the environment in 19th, 20th, and 21st century literature. Represented as resplendent landscape, increasingly industrialized space, ecologically compromised habitat, and as chemically altered agricultural swath, the environment and... (read more)

22233

Gopal, Sangita

This course will build on our abilities to watch, analyze and write about media objects, particularly film. We will learn to recognize, define and elaborate on various kinds of cinema (fiction, documentary etc), genres (musical, western, horror etc), elements of narrative (script, plot, point of... (read more)

26050

Kaufman, Heidi

What happens when digital tools meet literature? What can the “digital turn” in literary studies help us to understand about stories, history, language, aesthetics, form, cultural networks, adaptation, rhetoric, and the transmission of the written word?

(read more)
26987

Peppis, Paul

Genre courses focus on particular genres and forms crucial for the study of English, American, and Anglophone literature and culture and are aimed primarily at English majors. So structured, these courses explicitly align with the first three of the English Department’s core competencies in ... (read more)

26991

Sayre, Gordon

The goal of this course is to learn how to analyze the structure of English sentences, or syntax. The method is sentence diagramming, a technique for identifying and separating the elements of a sentence, the subject, object, verb, conjunctions and clauses, in a graphic arrangement. We will only... (read more)