A & L

Arts & Letters (A&L) courses create meaningful opportunities for students to engage actively in the modes of inquiry that define a discipline. Courses are broad in scope and demonstrably liberal in nature (that is, courses that promote open inquiry from a variety of perspectives). Though some courses may focus on specialized subjects or approaches, there will be a substantial course content locating that subject in the broader context of the major issues of the discipline. Qualifying courses will not focus on teaching basic skills but will require the application or engagement of those skills through analysis and interpretation.

31962

Huang, Helen

This course explores how American short stories portray the grotesque and why the grotesque is a signature element in American literature. A plethora of... (read more)

31963

Conable, William

This course is an introduction to one of the major genres in literary studies. Students will read, discuss, and analyze, plays from a racially and ethnically... (read more)

31964

ENG 106 is an introduction to poetry suited to all undergraduate students, with or without a background in poetry. Through analysis and discussion of poems by... (read more)

31967

Wheeler, Elizabeth (Betsy)

This genre course revolves around key figures of fantasy literature such as magic, mythical beasts, supernatural powers, bodily transformation, portals,... (read more)

31968

Barter, Faith

Though the slave narrative genre reached its peak in the mid-19th century, this mode of autobiography has a history that stretches from the 1700s to the... (read more)

31970

Weeber, Susan

This course surveys African American literature from its origins to the present. We will read a wide variety of authors and genres, including fiction, essays,... (read more)

31971

Fickle, Tara

This course introduces students to some of the major works, authors, and themes of Asian American literature, a diverse body of writing broadly defined as... (read more)

31972

Brousseau, Marcel

As an introductory survey, this course emphasizes the formal, thematic, and cultural diversity of Native American literatures. Recognizing that Native textual... (read more)

31989

In this course we will examine theories of argumentation in the oral mode, and then incorporate those theories into the practice of making effective speeches... (read more)

31993

LeMenager, Stephanie

This course begins with the question of what is the American novel? It is a question asked and answered by some of the most ingenious and challenging thinkers... (read more)

36095

Bryant-Berg, Kristy

This course offers a broad introduction to literature via examination of the American short story. We will begin in the 19th century with several of Poe’s short stories and... (read more)

36137

Myers, Kate

Madness, truth, honor, pity—these are a few of the concepts Shakespeare explores in his earliest plays. In this online course, we will scrutinize the... (read more)

36138

Bayless, Martha

This class is an introduction to the literature of the Age of King Arthur — the Middle Ages. We will read poetry, quests and adventures, Christian and pagan... (read more)

36139

This course is an introduction to literature that foregrounds and examines the relationship of humans with their surroundings, particularly the “natural,” non-... (read more)

36141

Fickle, Tara

The growing acceptance of comics and graphic novels as “serious” literature owes much to the genre’s embrace as a powerful vehicle for memory, especially by... (read more)

36142

Quigley, Mark

“Things Fall Apart”: Revolution, Reaction and Renewal in Early Twentieth Century Culture (1895-1945)

... (read more)
36203

ENG 240 introduces students to central concepts and essential texts in disability studies and applies them to literary and cultural texts, with a focus on... (read more)

36316

Alilunas, Peter

People respond to movies in different ways, and there are many reasons for this. We have all stood in the lobby of a theater and heard conflicting opinions... (read more)

36318

McGuffie, Allison

This course studies works of film and media as aesthetic objects that engage with communities identified by class, gender, race, ethnicity, and sexuality. It... (read more)

22768

In this course, you will learn how to identify, interpret, and form arguments about the elements of literary fiction. We will focus on the literary representations of black girlhood in texts that span the 20th and 21st centuries. In ENG 104: Introduction to Fiction we will read the stories of... (read more)

22772

Tiwari, Avinnash

Through this course, students develop analytical skills that will allow them to think, write, and speak intelligently about fiction. The course addresses basic questions about the nature of prose narrative and the interrelated activities of reading, writing, and interpretation. What is a story,... (read more)

22773

Carroll, Anna

This course offers a thorough introduction to the art of poetry, from Shakespeare to Kendrick Lamar, and considers the aesthetic and cultural investments we... (read more)

22809

Writers and scholars of the American novel have for some time denigrated sentimentalism by affiliating it with a weak, weepy sense of... (read more)

26950

Wojcik, Daniel

Introduces the study of beliefs about the supernatural by examining diverse approaches to the description and analysis of belief traditions and religious... (read more)

27044

Many of Shakespeare's early plays are romantic comedies, a genre that was and remains easy to dismiss as simplistic and idealized. However, under the... (read more)

27046

Laskaya, C. Anne

This course provides students an exposure to English and French literature important for the English literary tradition, in modern translations, from the very... (read more)

27047

Barter, Faith

This course is a survey of writings by African American authors of the 19th and 20th centuries. Studying fiction, essays, and poetry, we’ll close read representative texts to identify formal and thematic elements that characterize the African American literary tradition. We will consider how... (read more)

27135

Wilde, Jenée

Aliens, monsters, killer robots, mutants.... Such metaphors may express cultural fears of the “other” that underlie social prejudice, intolerance, and... (read more)

27136

Mastrostefano, Stephanie

This course will introduce you to the formal and narrative study of film. We will focus on film history, the technology of film production, and the methodology... (read more)

27691

Li, David

This is an introductory class to literature. As such, it emphasizes the double meanings inherent in literature’s etymological origin, “literacy.” We shall develop the competency to  “read” and “write” about the kind of texts that are considered “literary,” and more specifically about a type of... (read more)

27790

Myers, Kate

A survey course is, by its very nature, an incomplete project which must be
selective. Instead of worrying about a 'complete picture' of world
literature, let us instead think of ourselves as explorers or 'surveyors,'
using literary texts as fixed points with which we might... (read more)

12150

Smars, Bjorn

Actual reading lists vary significantly depending on the expertise and teaching philosophy of the instructor, but all sections of the course offer students a broad introduction to the study of literary fiction. Whether readings focus on the stories and novels of major writers or on works from a... (read more)

12151

Kovalchuk, Anna; Huang, Helen

Actual reading lists vary significantly depending on the expertise and teaching philosophy of the instructor, but all sections of the course offer students a broad introduction to the study of literary fiction. Whether readings focus on the stories and novels of major writers or on works from a... (read more)

12152

Kovalchuk, Anna

Actual reading lists vary significantly depending on the expertise and teaching philosophy of the instructor, but all sections of the course offer students a broad introduction to the study of literary fiction. Whether readings focus on the stories and novels of major writers or on works from a... (read more)

12153

Poetry ENG 106 is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of the formal properties of poetry in English. Through careful analysis poems by major writers, such as Plath, Whitman, Dickinson, McKay, Lee, Bishop, Brooks and many others, students will be challenged to explain not only... (read more)

12154

Shankman, Steven

We will read foundational works from three different ancient cultures: China, Greece, and Israel. We will pay particular attention to the question of the kinds of values that these foundational works were meant to instill in their ancient audiences. What does each culture have to say about... (read more)

12160

Dawson, Brent

Students read, discuss, and critique Shakespeare's early comedies and tragedies. Plays covered generally include (but are not limited to) A Mid-Summer Night's Dream, The Merchant of Venice, Henry IV (Part One), Richard II, Henry V, Julius Caesar... (read more)

12165

Whalan, Mark

This course is a survey of writings by African American authors. Studying fiction, essays, and poetry, we'll close read representative texts to identify formal and thematic elements that characterize the African American literary tradition. We will consider how these works exemplify and... (read more)

12497

An introduction to contemporary folklore studies, with emphasis on the meanings of stories, rituals, festivals, body art, subcultures, the supernatural, street art, Internet folklore, and other forms of vernacular expression as these relate to a diversity of social identities and cultural... (read more)

16078

Simnitt, Emily

What does it mean to be at home? How does it feel to lose one's home?

And how do ideas of home and homelessness shape our sense of self or security? This course builds on these questions to look at a collection of literary works that focus explicitly on the idea of home in American culture... (read more)

16083

Kelp-Stebbins, Kate

Comics and graphic narratives are uniquely suited to exploring cultural location because they transform the storytelling unit of the page into a space of representation. The comics page graphically negotiates dynamics of home and away, self and other, as well as race and culture. In this course... (read more)

16455

Brown, Kirby

In 1968, Kiowa writer N. Scott Momaday's House Made of Dawn was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for American literature. Momaday's award signaled for many the “arrival” of Native authors to the American literary scene, and ushered in an unprecedented era of Native literary production widely... (read more)

16456

Myers, Kate

Shakespeare’s later plays seem to be keenly aware of the power and influence of theatre. In selfreflexive characters we might categorize as lovers, fools, and madmen, his plays confront the political and social concerns of his original audiences, concerns that continue to challenge us today,... (read more)

16778

This course is an introduction to film and media studies and various methods of critical analysis. In this course, we will see that there are many productive ways of thinking about movies and many approaches we can use to analyze them. These approaches include the study of narrative structure,... (read more)

16943

McGuffie, Allison

This course studies works of film and media as representational objects that engage with communities identified by intersectional categories including sex,... (read more)

16950

Brousseau, Marcel

As an introductory survey, this course emphasizes the formal, thematic, and cultural diversity of Latinx literature. We will read novels, poetry, short stories, and comics, among other media, by authors from a range of identities—including Mexican American, Central American, Cuban American, and... (read more)

16967

Study of the history of institutions and industries that shape production and reception of film and media.

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40808

ENG 392 is the second of two-part, upper division chronological survey of the American novel from its beginnings in the 19th century to the present. ENG 392 covers the period from the early 20th century to the present. No prerequisites are required, but students should be capable of advanced... (read more)

40890

Bayless, Martha

This course is an examination of the period often considered the most “magical,” the Middle Ages. Looking at the practices of medieval western Europe, particularly Britain, we will examine how medieval culture defined magic, what they hoped to achieve by practicing (or forbidding) magic, and how... (read more)

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