A & L

Arts & Letters (A&L) courses create meaningful opportunities for students to engage actively in the modes of inquiry that define a discipline. Courses are broad in scope and demonstrably liberal in nature (that is, courses that promote open inquiry from a variety of perspectives). Though some courses may focus on specialized subjects or approaches, there will be a substantial course content locating that subject in the broader context of the major issues of the discipline. Qualifying courses will not focus on teaching basic skills but will require the application or engagement of those skills through analysis and interpretation.

22437

Johnson, Abigail

Utopia/Dystopia

What would be the perfect place to live? And how could we create heaven—or hell—on earth? These and other questions will be our focus as we examine fictional texts representing the idea of the utopia (or “ideal society”) as well as its unsettling mirror image: the dystopia... (read more)

22438

Jarvis, Michael

This section of ENG 104 will focus on detective fiction and the archetypal figure of the detective, situating its development within social and historical contexts. We will begin by thinking about the genre as a reactionary mode for expressing anxieties about race, gender, and nation, later... (read more)

22439

Saunders, Ben

Poetry is often regarded as the most demanding of all literary genres — the loftiest and most profound, the hardest to write, the most difficult to study.  Thanks to this challenging reputation, even English Majors are unlikely to read poetry for their own entertainment.  In fact, many people... (read more)

22445

Bovilsky, Lara

Students in ENG 208 read and discuss Shakespeare's later work. In this section, we’ll examine Shakespeare’s complex representations of desire, gender, intimacy, power, and anxiety within romantic and sexual relationships in his Sonnets and his plays Measure for Measure and The... (read more)

22447

ENG 240 introduces students to essential texts and concepts in disability studies and applies them to American history, popular culture, and literature, with a focus on racial diversity and learning directly from people who experience a wide spectrum of bodymind variabilities. Disability is not... (read more)

22449

Cortez, José

Chicana/os (Mexican Americans) and Latina/os have lived and worked in what is now the United States since before the founding of the country. During this time, they have produced literary texts and critical works designed to document their experiences as racialized subjects and their changing... (read more)

22450

Brown, Kirby

In 1968, Kiowa writer N. Scott Momaday's House Made of Dawn was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for American literature. Momaday's award signaled for many the “arrival” of Native authors to the American literary scene and ushered in an unprecedented era of Native literary and cultural... (read more)

22451

Burkert, Mattie

Culture as Data, Data as Culture

Digital technologies make it possible to study and communicate about literature and culture in new ways. Today, we can create interactive maps of ancient cities with geolocation data, use machine learning algorithms to discover patterns of... (read more)

22454

Kelp-Stebbins, Kate

This course provides an introduction to the analysis of comics and graphic narratives in terms of their poetics, genres, forms, history, and the academic discipline of Comics Studies. Our multifaceted examination will balance close reading with in-depth research and analysis of the development... (read more)

22455

Laskaya, C. Anne; Pyle, Forest

English 305 orients students to the intellectual rationale behind the English major by presenting the discipline’s history and debates. We will do this by studying “critical theory,” a form of writing that seeks less to interpret the meaning of cultural objects than to interrogate the historical... (read more)

22464

Cortez, José

The practice of bullshitting (“speech intended to persuade without regard for truth”) is firmly sedimented into civic life in the 21st century. Examples are everywhere: fake social media accounts and highjacked elections, accusations of fake news, fake academic controversies, deepfake... (read more)

22465

Kaufman, Heidi

Literature of the Jewish Ghetto

The idea of the ghetto—as a destination, an origin, a physical boundary, an emotional trap, a labyrinth, a prison, a haven, and an inspiration for self-determination—has been a focal point of Jewish literary culture since the seventeenth century. The first... (read more)

22467

Kelp-Stebbins, Kate

Comics and graphic narratives are uniquely suited to exploring cultural location because they transform the storytelling unit of the page into a space of representation. The comics page graphically negotiates dynamics of home and away, self and other, as well as race and culture. In this course... (read more)

22468

Clevinger, Kara

Nineteenth-Century American Novel

Do you enjoy reading novels? Are you interested in writing a novel? Do you like history? This winter transport yourself with a novel to the strange and terrifying world of nineteenth-century America. There you’ll find characters fighting enslavement and... (read more)

22469

Southworth, Helen

In this class we will focus on US and UK modernist fiction. Authors will include: Sherwood Anderson, Virginia Woolf, Jean Rhys, James Baldwin, and Katherine Mansfield. In each case, pairing literary analysis with a book historical approach, we’ll read the works up against their publishing... (read more)

23256

Sanyal, Debarghya

People respond to movies in different ways, and there are many reasons for this. We have all stood in the lobby of a theater and heard conflicting opinions from people who have just seen the same film. Some loved it, some hated it, some found it just OK. Perhaps we've thought, "What do they know... (read more)

23674

McGuffie, Allison

This course studies works of film and media as aesthetic objects that engage with communities identified by class, gender, race, ethnicity, and sexuality. It considers both the effects of prejudice, intolerance and discrimination on media and filmmaking practices and modes of reception that... (read more)

24907

Brundan, Katherine

This course provides a framework for thinking critically about illness, medical access, and the concept of health using humanities methodologies. Students will examine questions of structural inequities in medical outcomes and experiences based on gender, race, socio-economic status, immigrant... (read more)

12328

Alilunas, Peter

People respond to movies in different ways, and there are many reasons for this. We have all stood in the lobby of a theater and heard conflicting opinions from people who have just seen the same film. Some loved it, some hated it, some found it just OK. Perhaps we've thought, "What do they know... (read more)

12335

Alaimo, Stacy

What role can literature play in exposing environmentally harmful modes of thinking, being, and acting, while dramatizing appealing alternatives? How are environmental issues connected to social hierarchies such as race, class, sexuality and disability and to histories of settler colonialism?... (read more)

12336

Thorsson, Courtney

In this course we will study fiction, essays, and poetry by African American authors. We attend to the historical, political, and literary contexts of each of our readings. We will investigate whether there are specific formal and thematic elements that define an African American literary... (read more)

12339

Kaufman, Heidi

What happens when digital tools and literature meet? What can the “digital turn” in literary studies help us to understand about language, aesthetics, truth, fiction, media, and digital literacy? English 250 is an introductory course to Digital Humanities, or DH—a field that investigates the... (read more)

12342

Saunders, Ben

This class provides an introduction to the history and art of comics and to the methodologies of the academic discipline of Comics Studies. Students will be exposed to a range of different comic-art forms (including newspaper strips, collections of serialized comic books, and free-standing... (read more)

12343

Kelp-Stebbins, Kate

This course provides an introduction to the analysis of comics and graphic narratives in terms of their poetics, genres, forms, history, and the academic discipline of Comics Studies. Our multifaceted examination will balance close reading with in-depth research and analysis of the development... (read more)

12352

McGuffie, Allison

This course studies works of film and media as aesthetic objects that engage with communities identified by class, gender, race, ethnicity, and sexuality. It considers both the effects of prejudice, intolerance and discrimination on media and filmmaking practices and modes of reception that... (read more)

15023

Instructor - Alvarado R

Introduction to thinking and reasoning critically. How to recognize, analyze, criticize, and construct arguments.

Through the practice of argumentation in relation to current and classic controversies, this course is designed to improve your reasoning skills... (read more)

16505

Wojcik, Daniel

Explores the relationship between folklore and popular culture; examines a diversity of approaches to the analysis of "common culture" including urban legends, comics, cultural performances, youth culture, Internet folklore, street art, and other forms of expression as these relate to various... (read more)

16642

Bayless, Martha

This course will examine the Judeo-Christian Bible as a cultural document that continues to exert a strong and often unexamined influence on all aspects of our behavior, beliefs, literature, and art. We will read key sections of the Bible—both from the Hebrew and the Christian portions—examining... (read more)

16686

Crosswhite, James

How do we speak effectively in situations of controversy? How do we maintain civil but powerful ways of speaking? How do we use oral reasoning for inquiry and mutual understanding as well as for debate and for building and defending arguments? How can we learn to listen as carefully as we speak... (read more)

16690

LeMenager, Stephanie

This course begins with the question of what is the American novel? It is a question asked and answered by some of the most ingenious and challenging thinkers of the 20th century, who, as it turns out, were novelists. But for these thinkers who thought in the form of novels, the 20th century was... (read more)

17035

Clark, Stephanie

In this introduction to medieval literature we will consider the ways various authors explore questions about love, obedience, and the unknowable. We will read a variety of medieval genres, including instructions on how to behave during a love affair, Arthurian romances about Lancelot, an... (read more)

17036

Hernández, Teresa

This course is an introductory survey where we will begin to identify and define the distinct fields of Chicanx and Latinx literature. In addition to considering how history and politics shape these robust fields, we will also critically examine the ways in which texts and media continue to... (read more)

17176

Sanyal, Debarghya

English 107: Reinterpreting Ancient World Literature for Modern Times

In this survey course we will be exploring the oral literary traditions from three ancient and early medieval cultures: Greece, India, and the Middle East. We will examine each of our assigned texts through three... (read more)

17177

This course studies works of film and media as aesthetic objects that engage with communities identified by class, gender, race, ethnicity, and sexuality. It considers both the effects of prejudice, intolerance and discrimination on media and filmmaking practices and modes of reception that... (read more)

17948

Keeler, Kyle

According to Cherokee scholar, musician, and storyteller Thomas King, “The truth about stories is, that’s all we are” (2). Of course, then, at times people are dependent on who is telling their stories. Since time immemorial, Native American peoples have been telling their own stories, of... (read more)

17962

Donkin, Michael

Poetry is a word today often deployed in praise of what is not poetry; meanwhile, poetry itself is largely ignored or disparaged. It is curious, too, that a surprising number of people in the English-speaking world continue to write and appreciate poetry, even as its public role has... (read more)

18032

Wheeler, Elizabeth (Betsy)

ENG 240 introduces students to essential texts and concepts in disability studies and applies them to American history, popular culture, and literature, with a focus on racial diversity and learning directly from people who experience a wide spectrum of bodymind variabilities. Disability is not... (read more)

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