A & L

Arts & Letters (A&L) courses create meaningful opportunities for students to engage actively in the modes of inquiry that define a discipline. Courses are broad in scope and demonstrably liberal in nature (that is, courses that promote open inquiry from a variety of perspectives). Though some courses may focus on specialized subjects or approaches, there will be a substantial course content locating that subject in the broader context of the major issues of the discipline. Qualifying courses will not focus on teaching basic skills but will require the application or engagement of those skills through analysis and interpretation.

12035

McGuffie, Allison

This course studies works of film and media as aesthetic objects that engage with communities identified by class, gender, race, ethnicity, and sexuality. It considers both the effects of prejudice, intolerance and discrimination on media and filmmaking practices and modes of reception that... (read more)

12038

People respond to movies in different ways, and there are many reasons for this. We have all stood in the lobby of a theater and heard conflicting opinions from people who have just seen the same film. Some loved it, some hated it, some found it just OK. Perhaps we've thought, "What do they know... (read more)

12042

ENG 106 is an introduction to poetry, one of the major genres in literary studies. Through careful analysis of some of the most exciting poems by major writers and performers, students will be challenged to explain not only what a given poem might mean to its readers and listeners, but also how... (read more)

12051

Thorsson, Courtney

This course is a survey of writings by African American authors. Studying fiction, essays, and poetry, we will read representative texts to consider whether there are specific formal and thematic elements that characterize an African American literary tradition. We will consider how these texts... (read more)

12052

Kaufman, Heidi

English 250 is an introductory course to Digital Humanities, or DH—a field that explores the intersection of digital culture and the humanities. We live in a time when the written word is undergoing a revolution. The rise of audio dramas and podcasts, e-books, webpages, audible books, and even... (read more)

12062

Cortez, José

The practice of bullshitting (“speech intended to persuade without regard for truth”) is firmly sedimented into civic life in the 21st century. Examples are everywhere: fake social media accounts and highjacked elections, accusations of fake news, fake academic controversies, deepfake... (read more)

15669

The major plays in chronological order with emphasis on the early and middle plays through "Hamlet."

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15671

Cortez, José

Chicana/os (Mexican Americans) and Latina/os have lived and worked in what is now the United States since before the founding of the country. During this time, they have produced literary texts and critical works designed to document their experiences as racialized subjects and their changing... (read more)

15672

Southworth, Helen

This course focuses on the novel in twentieth-century Britain, from Conrad to the present.

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15674

Crosswhite, James

How do we speak effectively in situations of controversy? How do we maintain civil but powerful ways of speaking? How do we use oral reasoning for inquiry and mutual understanding as well as for debate and for building and defending arguments? How can we learn to listen as carefully as we speak... (read more)

16208

Saunders, Ben

This class provides an introduction to the history and art of comics and to the methodologies of the academic discipline of Comics Studies.  Students will be exposed to a range of different comic-art forms (including newspaper strips, collections of serialized comic books, and free-standing... (read more)

41837

Kelp-Stebbins, Kate

This course provides an introduction to the analysis of comics and graphic narratives in terms of their poetics, genres, forms, history, and the academic discipline of Comics Studies. Our multifaceted examination will balance close reading with in-depth research and analysis of the development... (read more)

41838

Clevinger, Kara

Do you enjoy reading novels? Are you interested in writing a novel? Do you like history? This summer transport yourself with a novel to the strange and terrifying world of nineteenth-century America. There you’ll find characters fighting gothic terrors, enslavement, social injustice, and the... (read more)

41839

Upton, Corbett

After the end of the world

after death

I found myself in the midst of life

creating myself

building life

--“In the Midst of Life,” Tadeusz Rózewicz

After the cataclysm of WWII, the old order was beginning to crumble. In this aftermath, many artists viewed the... (read more)

41845

Carroll, Anna

This course takes readers on a journey through the history of one of the world's oldest forms of artistic expression: poetry. From the battlefields of classical epics to the stages of slam poets, from the Japanese haiku to the Italian sonnet, from Shakespeare to Kendrick Lamar, this class will... (read more)

41846

Huang, Helen

Money Is Life: Twentieth-Century American Drama

This course explores how twentieth-century American playwrights raise concerns about this American life. Through reading Tennessee Williams’s A Streetcar Named Desire, Arthur Miller’s Death of a Salesman, and Lorraine Hansberry’... (read more)

42213

Rust, Stephen

ENG 110M: In this face-to-face course, we will see that there are many productive ways of thinking about movies and many approaches we can use to analyze them. These approaches include the study of narrative structure, cinematic form, authorship, genre, stars, reception and categories of social... (read more)

42214

McGuffie, Allison

This course studies works of film and media as aesthetic objects that engage with communities identified by class, gender, race, ethnicity, and sexuality. It considers both the effects of prejudice, intolerance and discrimination on media and filmmaking practices and modes of reception that... (read more)

42215

Rust, Stephen

ENG 381M: This asynchronous WEB course studies works of film and media produced around the globe as aesthetic objects that engage with communities identified by class, gender, race, ethnicity, and sexuality. It considers both the effects of prejudice, intolerance and discrimination on media and... (read more)

42282

Barter, Faith

ENG 241 introduces students to African American literature through a survey of short stories, essays, poetry, and autobiography. This course does not require a textbook or the purchase of any course materials. As we move through a selection of literature from the 19th and early 20th centuries,... (read more)

42283

Wakefield, Eleanor

This four-week, asynchronous online course offers students a broad introduction to the study of literary fiction. The course addresses basic questions about the nature of prose narrative and the interrelated activities of reading, writing, and interpretation. What is a story, and what roles do... (read more)

42284

Bryant-Berg, Kristy

Actual reading lists vary significantly depending on the expertise and teaching philosophy of the instructor, but all sections of the course offer students a broad introduction to the study of literary fiction. Whether readings focus on the stories and novels of major writers or on works from a... (read more)

31359

Further emphasis on more abstract and challenging conversational and narrative ranges. Explores broader political and social activities of international deaf community.

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31360

Further emphasis on more abstract and challenging conversational and narrative ranges. Explores broader political and social activities of international deaf community.

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33619

Roethle, Christopher

Introduction to Comics Poetry

It may seem strange to think of comics and poetry in connection with one another. Yet comics, in their way, have always been an intensely poetic medium even when no outright poetry has been involved. The increasing number of scholarly papers and web articles... (read more)

33623

Dawson, Brent

In this course, students will read four innovative works from the first half of Shakespeare’s career: A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Richard II, the Merchant of Venice, and Hamlet. Together, we will gain an appreciation for the plays’ mixture of entertainment and... (read more)

33626

Otjen, Nathaniel

This course will introduce students to environmental literature, focusing on narratives written about — and sometimes even with — nonhuman species. We will consider how animals, plants, and fungi operate not only as characters that come alive on the page, but also as lively interlocuters through... (read more)

33628

Galentine, Cassandra

Latinxs have lived, worked, and thrived in what is now considered the United States for a long time. This course is an introductory survey of U.S. Latinx literature that will give students a glimpse of the wide range of formal, thematic, and cultural diversity of Latinx novels, short stories,... (read more)

33629

Eccleston, Rachel

This class provides an introduction to the academic discipline of Comics Studies. We will explore a spectrum of comic-art forms (the newspaper strip, the comic book, the graphic novel) and a variety of modes and genres. We will closely read primary texts as well as contemporary comics... (read more)

33632

Brundan, Katherine

The Gothic Novel

What does it mean when we say a text is Gothic? How does the Gothic affect us, its readers or viewers? The Gothic has often coincided with moments of great societal change or transitional time periods. In difficult times particularly, we may find the Gothic’s dark vision... (read more)

33633

Kaufman, Heidi

The Nineteenth-Century British Novel

This course focuses on the novel’s shifting development in the nineteenth century.  We’ll consider how each generation and/or individual writer boldly overturned, pushed, revised, challenged, or otherwise re-imagined the form and content of the novel.... (read more)

33635

Crosswhite, James

How do we speak effectively in situations of controversy? How do we maintain civil but powerful ways of speaking? How do we use oral reasoning for inquiry and mutual understanding as well as for debate and for building and defending arguments? How can we learn to listen as carefully as we speak... (read more)

33636

Cortez, José

How to combat bullshit, misinformation, and fake news. The practice of bullshitting (“speech intended to persuade without regard for truth”) is firmly sedimented into civic life in the 21st century. Examples are everywhere: fake social media accounts and highjacked elections, accusations of fake... (read more)

33637

Wood, Mary

This course will examine the constellation of history, memory, and family that informs so much of Jewish-American literature.  While we will read a handful of pre-2000 texts to get a sense of the wider history and contexts of Jewish literature, the focus of the course this term will be on twenty... (read more)

33639

Southworth, Helen

This course offers an introduction to the graphic narrative form with a focus on life-writing and coming of age narratives.  Themes will include: the process of life-writing; time; representing bodies/disability; “comic’s long history of ‘powerful marginality’” (El Refaie, 7); reader response;... (read more)

33640

Wheeler, Elizabeth (Betsy)

This course examines human bodies in comics, focusing on intersections of disability with gender, race, and sexuality. We consider the intertwined relationship between bodies and minds that disability studies scholars call the bodymind. Change is a fundamental property of bodyminds. Sometimes we... (read more)

33641

Barter, Faith

This course examines the 19th-century American novel through two of its strangest and most intricate epics: Martin Delany’s Blake, or the Huts of America and Herman Melville’s Moby-Dick. By focusing on these two novels, we will pay particular attention to how 19th-century novelists... (read more)

33642

Peppis, Paul

ENG 394 is the first in a two-part chronological, upper division survey of modern literature from America, Britain, and Europe. The course incorporates works of drama, poetry, and prose, and attends closely to philosophical, political, and cultural events that run parallel to developments in... (read more)

20516

Wojcik, Daniel

Folklore and the Supernatural (4). Introduces the study of beliefs about the supernatural by examining diverse theoretical approaches to the description and analysis of belief traditions and religious cultures. Topics include apparitions, apocalyptic cults, magic, zombies, possession states, and... (read more)

20517

Instructor: Lowthorp, L.

This course introduces students to the research questions, theoretical orientations, and fieldwork methods used to study folklore, and therefore satisfies the Arts and Letters group requirements. Students will examine concepts that are central to folkloristic... (read more)

20518

Sayre, Gordon

In this course we study car collecting and customizing as vernacular art traditions, and survey the astonishing range of human behaviors around cars and trucks. To better understand cars we also will learn of the history of the automotive industry, environmental issues arising from cars, and U.S... (read more)

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