A & L

Arts & Letters (A&L) courses create meaningful opportunities for students to engage actively in the modes of inquiry that define a discipline. Courses are broad in scope and demonstrably liberal in nature (that is, courses that promote open inquiry from a variety of perspectives). Though some courses may focus on specialized subjects or approaches, there will be a substantial course content locating that subject in the broader context of the major issues of the discipline. Qualifying courses will not focus on teaching basic skills but will require the application or engagement of those skills through analysis and interpretation.

32030

Weeber, Susan

In ENG 104, we will explore texts that articulate the connections between the textual body and the human body it seeks to represent. We will pay special attention to themes of joy, resilience, and beauty as they relate to embodiment. To consider how these texts navigate race, gender, embodiment... (read more)

32035

Bovilsky, Lara

Students in ENG 207 read and discuss Shakespeare's earlier work. Specific topics for discussion may include Shakespeare’s representations of friendship, gender, sexuality and desire, familial and political conflict, consciousness, emotion, history, ethics, power, and authorship itself,... (read more)

32038

appreciation for the power of environmental literature to contribute to the move toward a more ethical In order to address the current climate and environmental crises, it is important to look at not just technological and scientific solutions, but at the ways in which cultural productions can... (read more)

32040

Thorsson, Courtney

This course is a survey of writings by African American authors. We will study fiction, essays, and poetry in their historical, political, and literary contexts from the late-eighteenth century to the present. We will investigate whether there are specific formal and thematic elements that... (read more)

32041

This introductory course explores the forms, cultural resonances, aesthetics, and political exigency of Latinx literatures in the United States. From the Chicano Civil Rights Movement to current debates on citizenship, this course examines how Latinx literature from the 20th and 21st centuries... (read more)

32042

Brown, Kirby

In 1968, Kiowa writer N. Scott Momaday's House Made of Dawn was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for American literature. Momaday's award signaled for many the “arrival” of Native authors to the American literary scene and ushered in an unprecedented era of Native literary production widely... (read more)

32044

Kelp-Stebbins, Kate

This course provides an introduction to the analysis of comics and graphic narratives in terms of their poetics, genres, forms, history, and the academic discipline of Comics Studies. Our multifaceted examination will balance close reading with in-depth research and analysis of the development... (read more)

32054

Miller, Quinn

This course introduces students to critical thinking about the historical and economic factors influencing film, media, and cultural production in Hollywood and in response to Hollywood. Unconventional textual and contextual dynamics, understood as queer history, are the focus of the course,... (read more)

32055

Kelp-Stebbins, Kate

Comics and graphic narratives are uniquely suited to exploring cultural location because they transform the storytelling unit of the page into a space of representation. The comics page graphically negotiates dynamics of home and away, self and other, as well as race and culture. In this course... (read more)

32268

Wojcik, Daniel

Introduces the study of beliefs about the supernatural by examining diverse approaches to the description and analysis of belief traditions and religious cultures. Topics include apparitions, apocalyptic cults, magic, zombies, possession states, and supernatural assault.  A&L, IC, ENGL,... (read more)

35694

LeMenager, Stephanie

ENG 104 introduces you to fiction and its formal elements by reading, discussing, and writing about short stories and one short novel. To highlight the imaginative work of fiction, we will focus in this course on speculative fiction, including science fiction, weird fiction, and fantasy. Each... (read more)

35792

Frank, David

This course satisfies an Arts and Letters Group requirement. It is designed to provide students with an understanding of the rhetorical principles that underlie the invention of arguments, i.e. the process that leads to the selection of premises and appeals that become the basis for reasoned... (read more)

35801

Alaimo, Stacy

Although reading novels is generally a solitary activity, the novel as a genre has not only encompassed a multitude of voices but has promoted social visions. The diverse set of novels in this class begin with William Faulkner’s weird tale of modernist alienation and isolation, moving toward... (read more)

36119

Hatay-Ferens, Molly

Liars, Fools, and Con Artists. In this class, we will read misleading, deceptive stories and untrustworthy narrators. When you can’t trust the narrator, what should you focus on? What do untrustworthy narrators and deceptive stories reveal about the nature of reading, writing, and interpretation... (read more)

36459

Peppis, Paul

This course participates in the ongoing reassessment of relations between aesthetic modernism and popular culture. The rise of "New Modernist studies" over the past twenty five years, with its expansive historical orientation and interest in modernism's original cultural contexts, has led to a... (read more)

36589

Alilunas, Peter

People respond to movies in different ways, and there are many reasons for this. We have all stood in the lobby of a theater and heard conflicting opinions from people who have just seen the same film. Some loved it, some hated it, some found it just OK. Perhaps we've thought, "What do they know... (read more)

37005

Brundan, Katherine

This course provides a framework for thinking critically about illness, medical access, and the concept of health using humanities methodologies. Students will examine questions of structural inequities in medical outcomes and experiences based on gender, ethnicity, socio-economic status,... (read more)

22039

Theme: Disability in Modern Fiction

Instrucror:  A. Steele

ENG 104 introduces you to prose narrative and its formal elements by reading, discussing, and writing about works of modern literature. To help us better recognize these formal elements, we will pay specific attention to the... (read more)

22042

Burkert, Mattie

ENG 105 is an introduction to drama—literature written for performance or with the conventions of performance in mind. In this course you will read, discuss, and analyze a diverse selection of influential plays by English and American writers, in addition to works in translation. The texts we... (read more)

22043

Garcia, Rogelio

People respond to movies in different ways, and there are many reasons for this. We have all stood in the lobby of a theater and heard conflicting opinions from people who have just seen the same film. Some loved it, some hated it, some found it just OK. Perhaps we've thought, "What do they know... (read more)

22050

Barter, Faith

This course is a survey of writings by African American authors from the 18th century through the Harlem Renaissance. Studying fiction, essays, and poetry, we’ll close read representative texts to identify formal and thematic elements that characterize the African American literary tradition. We... (read more)

22053

Burkert, Mattie

ENG 250 is the gateway to the English Department’s Digital Humanities Minor. The interdisciplinary field of digital humanities (DH) is concerned with the relationship between digital technology and the humanities (academic disciplines that study language, literature, history, philosophy,... (read more)

22056

Kelp-Stebbins, Kate

This course provides an introduction to the analysis of comics and graphic narratives in terms of their poetics, genres, forms, history, and the academic discipline of Comics Studies. Our multifaceted examination will balance close reading with in-depth research and analysis of the development... (read more)

22065

Cortez, José

Bullshit, Fake News, and Argumentation

The practice of bullshitting (“speech intended to persuade without regard for truth”) is firmly sedimented into civic life in the 21st century. Examples are everywhere: fake social media accounts and highjacked elections, accusations of... (read more)

22336

Wojcik, Daniel

Explores the role of folklore in people's religious lives with particular emphasis on narrative, beliefs, rituals, celebrations, otherworldly encounters, pilgrimage, and ecstatic states.

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26359

Hernández, Teresa

This course is an introductory survey where we will identify and define the field of Chicanx and Latinx literatures and cultural studies through a critical engagement. In addition to considering how history, politics, and literary periods shape these robust fields, we will also examine the ways... (read more)

26360

Odell, Ross

What is the Age of King Arthur? Legends of King Arthur, Excalibur, Merlin, the Holy Grail, and Camelot have persisted from their medieval origins into our contemporary culture. In this introductory English course, we will read Arthurian literature in translation from French, German, Welsh, Latin... (read more)

26397

Saunders, Ben

Poetry is often regarded as the most demanding of all literary genres — the loftiest and most profound, the hardest to write, the most difficult to study.  Thanks to this challenging reputation, even English Majors are unlikely to read poetry for their own entertainment.  In fact, many people... (read more)

26403

Trapp, Brian

ENG 240 introduces students to central concepts and essential texts in disability studies and applies them to literary and cultural texts, with a focus on racial diversity and learning directly from writers and scholars who experience a wide spectrum of body/mind variabilities. The texts in this... (read more)

26408

Frank, David

In this course we will examine theories of reasoned-based argumentation in the oral mode, and then incorporate those theories into the practice of making effective speeches that advocate for particular positions on arguable issues of public concern. We will analyze and critique oral arguments as... (read more)

26412

Southworth, Helen

In this course we’ll explore graphic narratives as a mode of life writing (biography. autobiography, memoir, coming of age narratives). We’ll discuss the ways in which the graphic narrative lends itself particularly well to these kinds of stories. Themes will include: the process of life-writing... (read more)

26428

Dawson, Brent

St. Augustine once wrote, “I have become a question to myself.” What does it mean to turn my self into a question? And how could I possibly capture this self in words? Students in this section of 108 World Literature will look at three Renaissance authors—Shakespeare, Montaigne, and Petrarch—who... (read more)

26845

Wojcik, Daniel

An introduction to contemporary folklore studies, with emphasis on the meanings of stories, rituals, festivals, body art, subcultures, the supernatural, street art, Internet folklore, and other forms of vernacular expression as these relate to a diversity of social identities and cultural... (read more)

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