IP

Multicultural, Identity, Pluralism, and Tolerance (IP) courses examine the social construction of collective identities, the emergence of representative voices from varying social and cultural standpoints, and the effects of prejudice, intolerance, and discrimination. The purpose of courses in this category is to analyze the general principles underlying tolerance, or the lack of it.

12035

McGuffie, Allison

This course studies works of film and media as aesthetic objects that engage with communities identified by class, gender, race, ethnicity, and sexuality. It considers both the effects of prejudice, intolerance and discrimination on media and filmmaking practices and modes of reception that... (read more)

12051

Thorsson, Courtney

This course is a survey of writings by African American authors. Studying fiction, essays, and poetry, we will read representative texts to consider whether there are specific formal and thematic elements that characterize an African American literary tradition. We will consider how these texts... (read more)

12061

Brundan, Katherine

More women than men wrote novels during the nineteenth century - and when they did, they had to navigate a world haunted by the suffocating shadow of the Angel of the House (as Virginia Woolf put it). By abandoning such stereotypes of femininity in order to write novels, women turned to genres... (read more)

12084

Miller, Quinn

This course explores research into gender and sexuality within Television and Media Studies, examining the history of this academic area in relation to multiple threads of queer and trans feminist criticism of film and media culture, including through independent student research into the LGBT+... (read more)

15670

Brown, Kirby

ENG 361: Native American Writers--Contemporary Indigenous Women Writers

Malintzin Tenepat. Pocahontas. Sacagawea. These are likely a few of only a handful of Indigenous women with whom many of us are familiar. Though real historical and contemporary figures, they are often depicted in... (read more)

15671

Cortez, José

Chicana/os (Mexican Americans) and Latina/os have lived and worked in what is now the United States since before the founding of the country. During this time, they have produced literary texts and critical works designed to document their experiences as racialized subjects and their changing... (read more)

42214

McGuffie, Allison

This course studies works of film and media as aesthetic objects that engage with communities identified by class, gender, race, ethnicity, and sexuality. It considers both the effects of prejudice, intolerance and discrimination on media and filmmaking practices and modes of reception that... (read more)

42215

Rust, Stephen

ENG 381M: This asynchronous WEB course studies works of film and media produced around the globe as aesthetic objects that engage with communities identified by class, gender, race, ethnicity, and sexuality. It considers both the effects of prejudice, intolerance and discrimination on media and... (read more)

42282

Barter, Faith

ENG 241 introduces students to African American literature through a survey of short stories, essays, poetry, and autobiography. This course does not require a textbook or the purchase of any course materials. As we move through a selection of literature from the 19th and early 20th centuries,... (read more)

31361

Study of the relationship between small groups and dominant culture in the United States. Explore issues of language, culture, self-representation, identity, and social structure.

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31452

Wojcik, Daniel

An introduction to contemporary folklore studies, with emphasis on the meanings of stories, rituals, festivals, body art, subcultures, street art, Internet folklore, and other forms of expression as these relate to a diversity of social identities and cultural contexts.  

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33628

Galentine, Cassandra

Latinxs have lived, worked, and thrived in what is now considered the United States for a long time. This course is an introductory survey of U.S. Latinx literature that will give students a glimpse of the wide range of formal, thematic, and cultural diversity of Latinx novels, short stories,... (read more)

33630

Southworth, Helen

This course covers a selection of works by women writing (mostly novels and short stories) in the first half of the twentieth century.  Authors will include: Jean Rhys, Nella Larson, Virginia Woolf, Colette (in translation) and Katherine Mansfield.

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33631

Kelp-Stebbins, Kate

What does it mean for a woman to write her self in comics? Our class will explore the form of graphic memoir through works such as Marjane Satrapi’s Persepolis, Alison Bechdel’s Fun Home, and Bishakh Som’s Spellbound, in order to think through the risks and tactics of... (read more)

33637

Wood, Mary

This course will examine the constellation of history, memory, and family that informs so much of Jewish-American literature.  While we will read a handful of pre-2000 texts to get a sense of the wider history and contexts of Jewish literature, the focus of the course this term will be on twenty... (read more)

33640

Wheeler, Elizabeth (Betsy)

This course examines human bodies in comics, focusing on intersections of disability with gender, race, and sexuality. We consider the intertwined relationship between bodies and minds that disability studies scholars call the bodymind. Change is a fundamental property of bodyminds. Sometimes we... (read more)

20517

Instructor: Lowthorp, L.

This course introduces students to the research questions, theoretical orientations, and fieldwork methods used to study folklore, and therefore satisfies the Arts and Letters group requirements. Students will examine concepts that are central to folkloristic... (read more)

22447

ENG 240 introduces students to essential texts and concepts in disability studies and applies them to American history, popular culture, and literature, with a focus on racial diversity and learning directly from people who experience a wide spectrum of bodymind variabilities. Disability is not... (read more)

22449

Cortez, José

Chicana/os (Mexican Americans) and Latina/os have lived and worked in what is now the United States since before the founding of the country. During this time, they have produced literary texts and critical works designed to document their experiences as racialized subjects and their changing... (read more)

22450

Brown, Kirby

In 1968, Kiowa writer N. Scott Momaday's House Made of Dawn was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for American literature. Momaday's award signaled for many the “arrival” of Native authors to the American literary scene and ushered in an unprecedented era of Native literary and cultural... (read more)

22463

Miller, Quinn

This class explores liner notes written for vinyl records and other media formats. With a focus on the 1950s-1970s and labels like Rosetta Records, we study essays printed on LP packaging – on the cardboard sleeves that contain, transport, and protect the recorded sound of an album – doing so in... (read more)

22465

Kaufman, Heidi

Literature of the Jewish Ghetto

The idea of the ghetto—as a destination, an origin, a physical boundary, an emotional trap, a labyrinth, a prison, a haven, and an inspiration for self-determination—has been a focal point of Jewish literary culture since the seventeenth century. The first... (read more)

22466

Thorsson, Courtney

Black Feminist Literature

In this course, we will study works from the vast body of Black feminist literature. Our texts will be by African American women writers, activists, teachers, and intellectuals and will span the late-nineteenth century to the present. Our readings will be diverse... (read more)

23674

McGuffie, Allison

This course studies works of film and media as aesthetic objects that engage with communities identified by class, gender, race, ethnicity, and sexuality. It considers both the effects of prejudice, intolerance and discrimination on media and filmmaking practices and modes of reception that... (read more)

12336

Thorsson, Courtney

In this course we will study fiction, essays, and poetry by African American authors. We attend to the historical, political, and literary contexts of each of our readings. We will investigate whether there are specific formal and thematic elements that define an African American literary... (read more)

12349

Thorsson, Courtney

In this course, we will study a selection of novels by Black American women from the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Using close reading and historical context, we will consider how these novels construct race, class, and gender; the possibilities of the novel form; ways these texts engage... (read more)

12352

McGuffie, Allison

This course studies works of film and media as aesthetic objects that engage with communities identified by class, gender, race, ethnicity, and sexuality. It considers both the effects of prejudice, intolerance and discrimination on media and filmmaking practices and modes of reception that... (read more)

16505

Wojcik, Daniel

Explores the relationship between folklore and popular culture; examines a diversity of approaches to the analysis of "common culture" including urban legends, comics, cultural performances, youth culture, Internet folklore, street art, and other forms of expression as these relate to various... (read more)

16687

Barter, Faith

Topic: Black Supernatural

Working from the 19th century to the present, this course will consider African American and Caribbean literature that troubles our notions of the “natural” and the “real.” Exploring narratives of hallucination, prophecy, and divination, we will study the ways... (read more)

16688

Brown, Kirby

Native American Writers (Contemporary Indigenous Women Writers): La Malinche. Pocahontas. Sacagawea. These are likely the only Indigenous women with whom many are familiar. Though real historical figures, these Indigenous women are often depicted in popular literature along a rigid spectrum as... (read more)

17036

Hernández, Teresa

This course is an introductory survey where we will begin to identify and define the distinct fields of Chicanx and Latinx literature. In addition to considering how history and politics shape these robust fields, we will also critically examine the ways in which texts and media continue to... (read more)

17177

This course studies works of film and media as aesthetic objects that engage with communities identified by class, gender, race, ethnicity, and sexuality. It considers both the effects of prejudice, intolerance and discrimination on media and filmmaking practices and modes of reception that... (read more)

17948

Keeler, Kyle

According to Cherokee scholar, musician, and storyteller Thomas King, “The truth about stories is, that’s all we are” (2). Of course, then, at times people are dependent on who is telling their stories. Since time immemorial, Native American peoples have been telling their own stories, of... (read more)

18032

Wheeler, Elizabeth (Betsy)

ENG 240 introduces students to essential texts and concepts in disability studies and applies them to American history, popular culture, and literature, with a focus on racial diversity and learning directly from people who experience a wide spectrum of bodymind variabilities. Disability is not... (read more)

32041

Reynolds, Megan

This introductory course explores the forms, cultural resonances, aesthetics, and political exigency of Latinx literatures in the United States. From the Chicano Civil Rights Movement to current debates on citizenship, this course examines how Latinx literature from the 20th and 21st centuries... (read more)

32042

Brown, Kirby

In 1968, Kiowa writer N. Scott Momaday's House Made of Dawn was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for American literature. Momaday's award signaled for many the “arrival” of Native authors to the American literary scene and ushered in an unprecedented era of Native literary production widely... (read more)

32047

Miller, Quinn

This class explores the histories of women writers creating culture around vinyl records. With a focus on the 1950s-1970s and labels like Rosetta Records, we study essays printed on LP packaging – on the cardboard sleeves that contain, transport, and protect the recorded sound of an album –... (read more)

32051

Barter, Faith

Working from the 19th century to the present, this course will consider African American and Afro-Caribbean literature that troubles our notions of the “natural” and the “real.” Exploring narratives of hallucination, prophecy, and divination, we will study the ways that Black writers have... (read more)

32054

Miller, Quinn

This course introduces students to critical thinking about the historical and economic factors influencing film, media, and cultural production in Hollywood and in response to Hollywood. Unconventional textual and contextual dynamics, understood as queer history, are the focus of the course,... (read more)

35789

Bohls, Elizabeth

Travel, or the journey, is often conceptualized in relation to home as the point of departure and return: in Homer’s Odyssey, the hero wanders as his wife waits faithfully in Ithaca. These gendered roles—man as traveler, woman as homebody—reflect age-old assumptions about travel. But... (read more)

35796

Sayre, Gordon

D’Arcy McNickle and Louise Erdrich were both born into métis or mixed-blood families on the northern plains, and wrote novels about the life of indigenous and immigrant peoples in and around a fictionalized version of a reservation, the Flathead Reservation in Montana and the Turtle Mountain... (read more)

36120

Gopal, Sangita

This course will examine feminist film criticism from multiple theoretical perspectives and diverse geo-political contexts. We will study how feminists have not only critiqued media and its representations of gender but also how the institution of cinema and media itself is gendered in terms of... (read more)

22050

Barter, Faith

This course is a survey of writings by African American authors from the 18th century through the Harlem Renaissance. Studying fiction, essays, and poetry, we’ll close read representative texts to identify formal and thematic elements that characterize the African American literary tradition. We... (read more)

22068

The Black Fantastic 

In 2020, against the backdrop of a pandemic, wildfires, anti-Black violence, a global wave of protests and social unrest, and political upheaval, Octavia Butler’s 1993 Afrofuturist novel, Parable of the Sower, reached the New York Times bestseller... (read more)

22336

Wojcik, Daniel

Explores the role of folklore in people's religious lives with particular emphasis on narrative, beliefs, rituals, celebrations, otherworldly encounters, pilgrimage, and ecstatic states.

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