Graduate Studies

11428

Wojcik, Daniel

Examines the nature of scholarly inquiry, research questions, and techniques in the discipline of folklore studies. Historic orientation with emphasis on ideological development of folkloristics from its beginnings to the present.

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12204

Miller, Quinn

This course explores research into gender and sexuality within Television and Media Studies, examining the history of this academic area in relation to multiple threads of queer and trans feminist criticism of film and media culture, including through independent student research into the LGBT+... (read more)

12206

Dawson, Brent

This course focuses on Shakespeare’s second set of history plays, known as the Henriad. These plays depict a moment of crisis in English history, when a king is dethroned, several popular uprisings follow, and eventually a modern nation-state emerges. While the plays’ understanding of government... (read more)

12207

Clark, Stephanie

ENG 428/528 is a course in learning to read and understand Old English, the earliest written form of the English language, and one of the languages spoken in England between the 5th and 11th centuries. We will concentrate on language basics, creating a firm foundation for reading Old English... (read more)

12208

Bergquist, Carolyn

We are going to look very closely at sentences to see how they work, how the individual parts of speech draw together into syntax, and what effect (artistic and otherwise) these patterns of syntax create. The course will mix technical study of sentence structures with reflection upon their... (read more)

12635

Alaimo, Stacy

This course provides a rigorous introduction to scholarly writing and speaking through the process of conceiving, researching, writing, workshopping, and revising one long paper and presenting this work as a conference paper at the end of the term. The course will also briefly introduce various... (read more)

15848

Exploration of major works, figures, controversies, social and cultural issues. Readings in Victorian fiction, poetry, drama, and nonfictional prose; study of examples of the visual arts and popular culture. Repeatable when topic changes for maximum of 8 credits.

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16106

Wood, Mary

This workshop will familiarize graduate students with basic practices related to publication: revision/expansion of essays; rhetorical forms and structures of essays; selection of journals; submission to journals; revision and resubmission; and, on the journal side, how editors and reviewers... (read more)

30946

Sayre, Gordon

In recent decades environmental scientists have used ice cores, tree rings, and trace elements to establish fine-grained histories of climate and ecology stretching back several hundred thousand years. Also, scholars in geo-mythology have compared folk legends to geologic events and paleoecology... (read more)

31458

Bayless, Martha

In this course we will explore some of the many myths and legends of the medieval Celts (in this case, the Welsh and the Irish), from King Arthur to CuChulainn and beyond.  We will look at the history of the Celts, at early Celtic culture, at what is known of Celtic gods and the Druids, and at... (read more)

31469

Bayless, Martha

Oral Traditions in Ancient and Modern Culture

In this course we’ll explore the old and new examples of the oldest form of literature —literature composed, told, and transmitted orally.  We’ll look at examples ranging from the Odyssey, Beowulf, and the medieval Irish epic, ... (read more)

33666

Alaimo, Stacy

This seminar delves into the intersections, tensions, and alliances between environmentally oriented posthumanisms, recent race theory, and indigenous thought. What are the convergences and frictions between the “nonhuman turn” and theoretical work in indigenous studies and black studies? How is... (read more)

33667

Saunders, Ben

Once upon a time, the four-color world of the superhero was a comfortingly simple place. The super-powered beings of the 1940s and 50s were secure in their sense of righteousness and saw no contradiction in the alignment of truth and justice with the American way. But in the 1960s superheroes... (read more)

33668

Kaufman, Heidi

This one-credit workshop prepares graduate teaching fellows to teach as instructor of record in undergraduate English classes. It aims to provide concrete, practical advice on key aspects of teaching undergraduate classes in literature or media: pedagogy; assisting in large lecture classes;... (read more)

33669

Bovilsky, Lara

In this course, currently dissertating students in the Politics, Culture, and Identity graduate specialization meet regularly with a faculty mentor to learn techniques for successful and contented writing and goal-setting. Students share goals, learn to plan at different timeframes, mentor and... (read more)

33670

Clevinger, Kara; north, tia

This course is designed to support GEs teaching in the University of Oregon’s Composition Program for the first time. We will discuss ways to foster an effective and inclusive learning environment for your students as well as refine understanding of the Composition Program pedagogy and learning... (read more)

33779

Burkert, Mattie

This project-based capstone experience is an opportunity for students to bring together all the skills and knowledge they have developed while completing the Digital Humanities minor. The initial weeks of the course will provide a firm foundation in organizing research materials using... (read more)

33780

Barter, Faith

This course examines representations of Black rebellions in fiction, graphic novels, autobiography, and theory. In reading accounts by and about Black rebels and revolutionaries, we will consider how the literature and discourse of Black rebellion has shaped traditions of Black radicalism and... (read more)

33781

Clark, Stephanie

Old English III will use the tools and knowledge acquired in previous terms of Old English to read the monsters section of Beowulf with critical and philological skill. We will pay attention to language, literary, and scholarly issues, including more in-depth study of Old English poetic... (read more)

33782

Simnitt, Emily

In this small project-based course, students learn about “community literacies.” While “academic” literacy focuses on reading and writing in a school-based setting, this class uses the idea of “counterstory” as social justice action to examine how structures in addition to schools “sponsor”... (read more)

33783

Kelp-Stebbins, Kate

In the last two decades, comics journalism has become one of the most provocative forms of creative nonfiction and an essential field of comics art. University of Oregon alum Joe Sacco, who received his BA in journalism in 1981, effectively founded contemporary comics journalism through his... (read more)

35520

Cortez, José

Political Resistance. What does it mean to talk about political inequality? How are we to think about political dissent, disruption, and resistance? And what is power? Is the antagonism that characterizes inequalities between overrepresented and underrepresented groups resolvable? For example,... (read more)

22491

Wood, Mary

This workshop will familiarize graduate students with basic practices related to publication: revision/expansion of essays; rhetorical forms and structures of essays; selection of journals; submission to journals; revision and resubmission; and, on the journal side, how editors and reviewers... (read more)

22495

Gershow, Miriam

Prospective Composition GEs who are Writing Center Tutors or who are in the first year of the Composition Training Program spend one term observing an experienced instructor or GE teaching an asynchronous WEB WR 121. The apprenticeship offers opportunities to reflect on teaching practices and... (read more)

22497

Wheeler, Elizabeth (Betsy)

ENG 660: Race and Disability in US Literature and Popular Culture introduces students to essential texts and concepts in intersectional disability studies and applies them to American history, popular culture, and literature, with a focus on racialized identities and learning directly from... (read more)

22498

Thorsson, Courtney

In this course, we will study African American novels and short stories of the twenty-first century in their historical, political, and literary contexts. As we read these works and relevant scholarly texts, we will consider questions of periodization, genre, and literary tradition. We will... (read more)

22610

Crosswhite, James

Rhetoric has been characterized as a power to lead the soul, the universal form of communication, the art of persuasion, the way we reason and deliberate with one another in conditions of uncertainty, the discourse of democracy, the ability to find and create arguments, the art of style, and as... (read more)

22611

Saunders, Ben

Once upon a time, the four-color world of the superhero was a comfortingly simple place.  The super-powered beings of the 1940s and 50s were secure in their sense of righteousness and generally saw no contradiction between truth, justice, and the American way.  But in the 1960s, superheroes... (read more)

22612

Dawson, Brent

Spenser claims the goal of his epic, The Faerie Queene, is “to fashion a gentleman”—that is, to make a person from a poem. How does reading shape life outside reading, and what would it mean to think of reading as an exercise in self-creation? The Faerie Queene investigates these questions... (read more)

22613

Clark, Stephanie

The Adventure Continues! In OEII we’ll read a varied selection of shorter poems and prose in Old English and perform a (virtual) reenactment of The Battle of Maldon. You’ll get some of the finer points of OE grammar and we’ll review other grammatical concepts as needed. The course will... (read more)

22614

Bergquist, Carolyn

We are going to look very closely at sentences to see how they work, how the individual parts of speech draw together into syntax, and what effect (artistic and otherwise) these patterns of syntax create. The course will mix technical study of sentence structures with reflection upon their... (read more)

22615

Alaimo, Stacy

Contemporary Literary Theory: Animal Studies/Plant Studies

Beginning with and featuring the U of O Common Reading, Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge and the Teaching of Plants, by Robin Wall Kimmerer and concluding with Alexis Pauline Gumbs’ experimental... (read more)

12370

Clark, Stephanie

ENG 428/528 is a course in learning to read and understand Old English, the earliest written form of the English language, and one of the languages spoken in England between the 5th and 11th centuries. We will concentrate on language basics, creating a firm foundation for reading Old English... (read more)

12385

Wald, Sarah D

This interdisciplinary graduate seminar explores the intersections of environment and race in the United States. We read scholarship that seeks to understand how racial projects articulate with changing cultural constructions of nature. How have representations of nature, land, or the... (read more)

16693

Pyle, Forest

What is Romanticism?

This course will be a sustained examination of the question: “What is Romanticism? This is a question which has no single or ultimate answer given that there seem to be as many answers as there are “askers.” There is, however, a rich and complex body of literature and... (read more)

16695

Sayre, Gordon

English 461 is an introduction to the literature of colonial North America and the Early United States, from the 1530s to the 1820s. This course is designed around four feature films: Cabeza de Vaca, Black Robe, Pocahontas, and Jefferson in Paris. These movies were based on the... (read more)

16696

Dawson, Brent

This seminar will read the Henriad--a connected series of Shakespearean history plays—alongside some early modern political philosophy, Shakespearean scholarship, and 20th-21st century theory. We will be interested in the ways these plays have been seen as works of “political materialism," a... (read more)

16697

Miller, Quinn

Pop art and popular culture at the intersection of queer representation, trans studies, music, and media theory, with a focus on historiography of the 1950s and 1960s global US. 

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17060

Bovilsky, Lara

In this course we will read Macbeth, King Lear, Coriolanus, and Antony and Cleopatra to think about how they represent cultural crisis at every scale: the large scale of a society, country, city-state, or empire in turmoil, the small scale of individual errors,... (read more)

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