English Minor

English Minor courses offer students centuries of cultural experience and representation in poetry, prose, drama, film, TV, new media, and folk artifacts.  The English minor can focus and extend the values of a liberal arts education, while also providing extensive training in writing, speaking, and critical thinking.
 

2666

Brundan, Katherine

This course focuses on fictional constructions of nation in British novels of the nineteenth century. In an era embracing massive... (read more)

16572

Wonham, Henry

This advanced seminar will expose students to some of the major fiction of two of the twentieth-century’s most influential American... (read more)

22216

Works representing the principal literary genres.

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22217

Works representing the principal literary genres.

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22218

Wheeler, Elizabeth (Betsy)

Why do stories matter? In this class we will read novels of childhood and adolescence, both fantasy and realistic, and compare them to... (read more)

22221

This course is an introduction to film and media studies and various methods of critical analysis. In this course, we will see that... (read more)

22222

Frank, David

This course is designed to provide students with the equipment they need to understand the theory and practice of public speaking as a... (read more)

22223

Brown, Kirby

Though signifying idealized notions of love in popular parlance, romance is about more than the transcendent power and emotional magic... (read more)

22228

Alaimo, Stacy

Do we read literature differently when we read for the environment? How are environmental issues connected to colonialism, gender,... (read more)

22230

Rust, Stephen

This course explores the fundamentals of film and media aesthetics, including narrative, mise-en-scène, cinematography, editing, and... (read more)

22231

This course explores the fundamentals of film and media aesthetics, including narrative, mise-en-scène, cinematography, editing, and... (read more)

22241

This course introduces students to critical thinking about the aesthetic, historical and economic factors influencing film, media, and... (read more)

25959

Emphasis on form, function, and style of scientific, professional, and technical writing; weekly writing assignments include proposals, reports, definitions, instructions, summaries. Use of documentation in publication.

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25960

Emphasis on form, function, and style of scientific, professional, and technical writing; weekly writing assignments include proposals, reports, definitions, instructions, summaries. Use of documentation in publication.

(read more)
25961

Practice in writing and analyzing internal and external messages common to business, industry, and professions. Suggested for business... (read more)

26303

Wojcik, Daniel

An introduction to contemporary folklore studies, with emphasis on the meanings of stories, rituals, festivals, body art, subcultures,... (read more)

26306

Wojcik, Daniel

Examines the research questions and theoretical models used by folklorists and other scholars in the study of vernacular religion and... (read more)

26542

Wonham, Henry

This course is an introduction to one of the major genres in literary studies. Students will read, discuss, analyze, and attend plays... (read more)

26543

Clark, Stephanie

Fantasy and Violence will examine the role of violence in literature of the fantastic with special attention to the problems violence... (read more)

26546

Fickle, Tara

This course introduces students to some of the major works, authors, and themes of Asian American literature, a diverse body of writing... (read more)

26547

The prolific White Earth Ojibwe writer Gerald Vizenor conceptualizes the cultural work of Indigenous literatures as “survivance,”... (read more)

26548

Kelp-Stebbins, Kate

This course provides an introduction to the analysis of comics and graphic narratives in terms of their poetics, genres, forms, history... (read more)

26549

This course is designed to introduce students to some important theories and practices of literary and cultural criticism. My goals for... (read more)

26556

Whalan, Mark

This course presents a survey of American novels in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. It will cover a variety of styles and... (read more)

26557

Quigley, Mark

“Things Fall Apart”: Revolution, Reaction and Renewal in Early Twentieth Century Culture (1895-1945)... (read more)

26558

Bovilsky, Lara

Students in “Shakespeare’s World” learn to read Shakespeare’s works in relation to the cultural, literary, and historical contexts in... (read more)

26563

Laskaya, C. Anne

ENG 427 invites students to engage selections from Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales. Texts will include the more familiar comedic... (read more)

26564

Clark, Stephanie

OEII reviews and builds on the grammatical foundations learned in OEI and adds to students’ knowledge of early English literature and... (read more)

26566

Whalan, Mark

This course provides a survey of American literature since 1900 with a focus on American literature in the world. We consider what... (read more)

26568

Dawson, Brent

This interdisciplinary course looks at how ideas of nature and the natural world shape early modern understandings of the Americas.... (read more)

26578

Crosswhite, James

Rhetoric has been characterized as a power to lead the soul, the universal form of communication, the art of persuasion, the way we... (read more)

26664

Kaufman, Heidi

What happens when digital tools and literature meet? What can the “digital turn” in literary studies help us to understand about... (read more)

26971

Practice in writing and analyzing internal and external messages common to business, industry, and professions. Suggested for business... (read more)

26988

Upton, Corbett

What makes a poem modern or a poet a modernist? The history of modern poetry, like that of any literary period, is a ... (read more)

12097

Huang, Helen

This course investigates how three contemporary female writers, Michelle Cliff, Jhumpa Lahiri, and Helena María Vitamontes, represent contemporary issues alienation, racism, immigration, (in)hospitality, environmental justice in diasporic contexts. Through reading Cliff, “The Dissolution of Mrs... (read more)

12098

Tiwari, Avinnash

Through this course, students develop analytical skills that will allow them to think, write, and speak intelligently about fiction.... (read more)

12099

Wheeler, Elizabeth (Betsy)

Why do stories matter? In this class we will read novels of childhood and adolescence, both fantasy and realistic, and compare them to... (read more)

12102

Alilunas, Peter

This course is an introduction to film and media studies and various methods of critical analysis. In this course, we will see that... (read more)

12105

Laskaya, C. Anne

Listening rigorously and deeply, inquiring into issues and topics of importance to our communities, and speaking effectively are key elements that assist our... (read more)

12106

Cortez, José

This course will introduce students to the genre of testimonial literary discourse, or testimonio: an authentic narrative, told... (read more)

12111

Barter, Faith

This course is a survey of literature by African American authors from the 19th century into the present. We will read texts from a range of genres... (read more)

12112

Preston, Sarah

As an introductory survey, this course emphasizes the formal, thematic, and cultural diversity of Latinx literature. We will read novels, poetry, short stories... (read more)

12113

Brown, Kirby

In 1968, Kiowa writer N. Scott Momaday's House Made of Dawn was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for American literature. The award signaled for many the “... (read more)

12114

Fickle, Tara

This course introduces students to the Digital Humanities (DH) — broadly defined as the use of digital tools, platforms, and critical perspectives to address... (read more)

12115

Steinhart, Daniel

This course provides an introduction to the analysis of form and style in cinema and related media, focusing on narrative, mise-en-... (read more)

12116

Ok, HyeRyoung

This course provides an introduction to the analysis of form and style in cinema and related media, focusing on narrative, mise-en-... (read more)

12117

O'Kelly, Brendan

This course provides an introduction to the analysis of comics and graphic narratives in terms of their poetics, genres, forms, history, and the academic... (read more)

12128

McGuffie, Allison

This course introduces students to critical thinking about the aesthetic, historical and economic factors influencing film, media, and cultural production. The... (read more)

12130

Myers, Kate

ENG 399 Writing Associates Development is a variable-credit, hybrid, companion course designed to support tutors in ENG 404 ... (read more)

12136

On- or off-campus internship in a variety of writing or literacy-related settings in connection with designated courses. Repeatable.

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12137

Not open to freshmen or sophomores.  On- or off-campus internship in a variety of writing or literacy-related settings in connection with designated courses. Repeatable.

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12138

On- or off-campus internship in a variety of writing or literacy-related settings in connection with designated courses. Repeatable.

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12140

Wood, Mary

In this interdisciplinary course, we will read creative nonfiction about first-hand experiences of mental and emotional suffering,... (read more)

12142

Bayless, Martha

This is the first in a three-course sequence aimed at reading and understanding Old English, the language of the Anglo-Saxons (the English between 449 and 1066... (read more)

15966

Carroll, Anna

Written reasoning as a process of argument. Developing and supporting theses in response to complex questions. Attention to critical reading in academic setting. Continuing focus on revising and editing.

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15967

Jarvis, Michael

Written reasoning as a process of argument. Developing and supporting theses in response to complex questions. Attention to critical reading in academic setting. Continuing focus on revising and editing.

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15968

Kratwell-Tierney, Paul

Written reasoning as a process of argument. Developing and supporting theses in response to complex questions. Attention to critical reading in academic setting. Continuing focus on revising and editing.

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15997

Zalyubovskiy, Ana

Written reasoning in the context of research. Practice in writing documented essays based on the use of sources. Continuing focus on revising and editing.

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15998

Zalyubovskiy, Ana

Written reasoning in the context of research. Practice in writing documented essays based on the use of sources. Continuing focus on revising and editing.

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15999

Zalyubovskiy, Ana

Written reasoning in the context of research. Practice in writing documented essays based on the use of sources. Continuing focus on revising and editing.

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16001

Smars, Bjorn

Written reasoning in the context of research. Practice in writing documented essays based on the use of sources. Continuing focus on revising and editing.

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16002

Smars, Bjorn

Written reasoning in the context of research. Practice in writing documented essays based on the use of sources. Continuing focus on revising and editing.

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16003

Casimir, Ulrick

Written reasoning in the context of research. Practice in writing documented essays based on the use of sources. Continuing focus on revising and editing.

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16004

Casimir, Ulrick

Written reasoning in the context of research. Practice in writing documented essays based on the use of sources. Continuing focus on revising and editing.

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16005

Weaver, Damien

Written reasoning in the context of research. Practice in writing documented essays based on the use of sources. Continuing focus on revising and editing.

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16006

Casimir, Ulrick

Written reasoning in the context of research. Practice in writing documented essays based on the use of sources. Continuing focus on revising and editing.

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16007

Weaver, Damien

Written reasoning in the context of research. Practice in writing documented essays based on the use of sources. Continuing focus on revising and editing.

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16008

Weaver, Damien

Written reasoning in the context of research. Practice in writing documented essays based on the use of sources. Continuing focus on revising and editing.

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16009

Zandstra, Robert

Written reasoning in the context of research. Practice in writing documented essays based on the use of sources. Continuing focus on revising and editing.

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16010

Zandstra, Robert

Written reasoning in the context of research. Practice in writing documented essays based on the use of sources. Continuing focus on revising and editing.

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16011

Bryant-Berg, Kristy

Written reasoning in the context of research. Practice in writing documented essays based on the use of sources. Continuing focus on revising and editing.

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16012

Galentine, Cassandra

Written reasoning in the context of research. Practice in writing documented essays based on the use of sources. Continuing focus on revising and editing.

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16013

Zandstra, Robert

Written reasoning in the context of research. Practice in writing documented essays based on the use of sources. Continuing focus on revising and editing.

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16014

North, Tia

Written reasoning in the context of research. Practice in writing documented essays based on the use of sources. Continuing focus on revising and editing.

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16015

Kovalchuk, Anna

Written reasoning in the context of research. Practice in writing documented essays based on the use of sources. Continuing focus on revising and editing.

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16016

Bryant-Berg, Kristy

Written reasoning in the context of research. Practice in writing documented essays based on the use of sources. Continuing focus on revising and editing.

(read more)
16021

Boscha, Tina

Emphasis on form, function, and style of scientific, professional, and technical writing; weekly writing assignments include proposals, reports, definitions, instructions, summaries. Use of documentation in publication.

Prerequisites: completion of university writing... (read more)

16022

Boscha, Tina

Emphasis on form, function, and style of scientific, professional, and technical writing; weekly writing assignments include proposals, reports, definitions, instructions, summaries. Use of documentation in publication.

Prerequisites: completion of university writing... (read more)

16023

Upton, Corbett

Practice in writing and analyzing internal and external messages common to business, industry, and professions. Suggested for business and management students.

Prerequisites: completion of university writing requirement; junior standing.

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16423

Miller, Quinn

This course examines the pithy praise appearing on book jackets and other product packaging. Blurbs are quick descriptions. They... (read more)

16424

Wald, Sarah D

This class explores depictions of the environment in literature with a particular emphasis on contemporary U.S. fiction and non-fiction. By attending to the... (read more)

16437

Miller, Quinn

This course analyzes situation comedy as a form that women writers use in and beyond television. Reading sitcom scripts, stand-up transcripts, and situation-... (read more)

16438

Kaufman, Heidi

In recent years Jewish fiction and non-fiction writers have turned to the archive quest narrative to explore family secrets, confusing histories, and lost or... (read more)

16439

Wheeler, Elizabeth (Betsy)

One could say that most comics are about the human body, in all its variations, exaggerations, erotics, poses, powers, and vulnerabilities. ... (read more)

16440

Wonham, Henry

Writers and scholars of the American novel have for some time denigrated sentimentalism by affiliating it with a weak, weepy sense of femininity. But... (read more)

16475

Whalan, Mark

This course will give a survey of American poetry in English from 1900 to 1950. In a historical time of enormous social and political upheaval, poets struggled... (read more)

16486

Cortez, José

This course will examine the cultural and literary discourses emerging from the locus of the U.S./Mexico border, a space of postnational political conflict that has extended deep into both... (read more)

16793

Kaufman, Heidi

This course will delve deeply into George Eliot’s last multi-plot novel, Daniel Deronda (1876). On the occasion of the 200th anniversary of her birth, the course will... (read more)

16933

Conable, William

This course is an introduction to drama, one of the major genres in literary studies. Students will read, discuss, and analyze plays... (read more)

16934

Craven, Robert

This course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of the formal properties of poetry in English. Through careful analysis of poems by... (read more)

16935

Sayre, Gordon

The goal of this course is to learn to analyze the structure of English sentences, or syntax. The method is sentence diagramming, a... (read more)

16941

Rossi, William

This course will survey several of the greatest literary hits of nineteenth-century America, including poetry, short fiction, nonfiction, and the novel. Some... (read more)

16980

Sanyal, Debarghya

This course provides an introduction to the analysis of comics and graphic narratives in terms of their poetics, genres, forms, history... (read more)

17027

Upton, Corbett

Practice in writing and analyzing internal and external messages common to business, industry, and professions. Suggested for business and management students.

Prerequisites: completion of university writing requirement; junior standing.

(read more)
17030

Bryant-Berg, Kristy

Written reasoning in the context of research. Practice in writing documented essays based on the use of sources. Continuing focus on revising and editing.

(read more)
41028

This course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of the formal properties of poetry in English. Through careful analysis of poems by major... (read more)

41030

Myers, Kate

In this class, we will carefully read sonnets and plays in order to develop the skills of close reading and analysis in order to support various interpretations of Shakespeare’s texts. These and other activities will prepare you for the course’s written work, including close readings, group ... (read more)

41032

This course explores the fundamentals of film and media aesthetics, including narrative, mise-en-scène, cinematography, editing, and... (read more)

41033

Gilroy, Andréa

Comics are suddenly everywhere. Sure, they’re in comic books and the funny pages, but now they’re on movie screens and TV screens and... (read more)

41034

Clevinger, Kara

"This is who we are, Mama. Real women." This declaration made by America Ferrera's character, Ana, in the 2002 film Real Women Have... (read more)

41036

Rust, Stephen

This course studies works of film and media as representational objects that engage with communities identified by intersectional categories including sex, gender,... (read more)

41038

Clevinger, Kara

The novel as a newer literary genre was a powerful, even potentially dangerous force in the newly-formed American nation. One 1838... (read more)

41039

Vázquez, David J

We will read four novels that span the time period from the early twentieth century to the present day, interpreting each novel in... (read more)

41040

Upton, Corbett

ENG 395 provides selective survey of contemporary literature between 1945 and the present. The course incorporates works of prose,... (read more)

42298

Emphasis on form, function, and style of scientific, professional and technical writing: weekly writing assignments include proposals,... (read more)

42463

This course will introduce students to the genre of testimonial literary discourse, or testimonio: an authentic narrative, told... (read more)

42467

This course will explore multicultural youth literature, covering literature for ages 0 to young adult. Students will engage with... (read more)

42475

Brousseau, Marcel

As an introductory survey, this course emphasizes the formal, thematic, and cultural diversity of Latinx literature. We will read novels, poetry, short stories, and comics, among other media, by authors from a range of identities—including Mexican American, Guatemalan American, Cuban American,... (read more)

42486

This course explores the “age” in which the legends of Arthur—and a good many other legends—came into being. In other words, this... (read more)

42488

Simnitt, Emily

Literature and Digital Culture offers a guided introduction to some of the new technologies that scholars use to study and make... (read more)

42523

Graman, Claire

This course is an introduction to film and media studies and various methods of critical analysis. In this course, we will see that... (read more)

42525

Rust, Stephen

This course is an introduction to film and media studies and various methods of critical analysis. In this course, we will see that... (read more)

42599

Through this course, students develop analytical skills that will allow them to think, write, and speak intelligently about fiction.... (read more)

42601

Many of Shakespeare's early plays are romantic comedies, a genre that was and remains easy to dismiss as simplistic and idealized.... (read more)

31961

Wonham, Henry

Students in ENG 104 will read and discuss a series of short story cycles by some of the America’s greatest writers of prose fiction.  The short story cycle is a unique form of fiction. ... (read more)

31962

Huang, Helen

This course explores how American short stories portray the grotesque and why the grotesque is a signature element in American literature. A plethora of... (read more)

31963

Conable, William

This course is an introduction to one of the major genres in literary studies. Students will read, discuss, and analyze, plays from a racially and ethnically... (read more)

31964

ENG 106 is an introduction to poetry suited to all undergraduate students, with or without a background in poetry. Through analysis and discussion of poems by... (read more)

31967

Wheeler, Elizabeth (Betsy)

This genre course revolves around key figures of fantasy literature such as magic, mythical beasts, supernatural powers, bodily transformation, portals,... (read more)

31968

Barter, Faith

Though the slave narrative genre reached its peak in the mid-19th century, this mode of autobiography has a history that stretches from the 1700s to the... (read more)

31970

Weeber, Susan

This course surveys African American literature from its origins to the present. We will read a wide variety of authors and genres, including fiction, essays,... (read more)

31971

Fickle, Tara

This course introduces students to some of the major works, authors, and themes of Asian American literature, a diverse body of writing broadly defined as... (read more)

31972

Brousseau, Marcel

As an introductory survey, this course emphasizes the formal, thematic, and cultural diversity of Native American literatures. Recognizing that Native textual... (read more)

31981

Bovilsky, Lara; Peppis, Paul; Saunders, Ben

ENG 303 is the third part of the year-long Foundations of the English Major series, and requires that students have taken at least ONE of ENG 301 or ENG 302.... (read more)

31989

Frank, David

In this course we will examine theories of argumentation in the oral mode, and then incorporate those theories into the practice of making effective speeches... (read more)

31993

LeMenager, Stephanie

This course begins with the question of what is the American novel? It is a question asked and answered by some of the most ingenious and challenging thinkers... (read more)

31998

Myers, Kate

ENG 399 Writing Associates Development is a variable-credit, hybrid, companion course designed to support tutors in ENG 404 Internship for Writing... (read more)

32007

Quigley, Mark

This course will explore the remarkable literary legacy of W.B. Yeats whose groundbreaking work charted the turmoil of revolution, war, and the collapse of a... (read more)

32008

Johnson, Mat

In this seminar, we will examine the form of sequential art we call comic books. The course is composed of two parts: close reading of landmark graphic novels... (read more)

32010

Laskaya, C. Anne

ENG 427 invites students to engage selections from Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales. Texts will include the more familiar comedic tales, like the Miller’s... (read more)

32012

Dugaw, Dianne

Major British Writers: Aphra Behn is an examination of this important writer who dominated London theatre in the 1670s, invented the English novel, translated philosophic and... (read more)

35685

Gazaille, Brian

Emphasis on form, function, and style of scientific, professional and technical writing: weekly writing assignments include proposals, reports, definitions,... (read more)

35686

Boscha, Tina

Emphasis on form, function, and style of scientific, professional and technical writing: weekly writing assignments include proposals, reports, definitions,... (read more)

35689

Wilde, Jenée

An assumption persists in writing courses that academic and literary essays are distinct: critical writers formulate arguments and manage subjective experiences with facts for... (read more)

36095

Bryant-Berg, Kristy

This course offers a broad introduction to literature via examination of the American short story. We will begin in the 19th century with several of Poe’s short stories and... (read more)

36098

Cortez, José

This course will introduce students to the study of basic sentence mechanics, conventions, and grammatical terminology. Additionally, the course covers various... (read more)

36100

Kelp-Stebbins, Kate

This course provides an introduction to the analysis of comics and graphic narratives in terms of their poetics, genres, forms, history, and the academic... (read more)

36104

Rust, Stephen

On soggy spring days, book lovers in the Pacific Northwest feel most at home curled up with a blanket and cup of coffee while reading our favorite novels and... (read more)

36137

Myers, Kate

Madness, truth, honor, pity—these are a few of the concepts Shakespeare explores in his earliest plays. In this online course, we will scrutinize the... (read more)

36138

Bayless, Martha

This class is an introduction to the literature of the Age of King Arthur — the Middle Ages. We will read poetry, quests and adventures, Christian and pagan... (read more)

36141

Fickle, Tara

The growing acceptance of comics and graphic novels as “serious” literature owes much to the genre’s embrace as a powerful vehicle for memory, especially by... (read more)

36142

Quigley, Mark

“Things Fall Apart”: Revolution, Reaction and Renewal in Early Twentieth Century Culture (1895-1945)

... (read more)
36168

Dawson, Brent

Spenser claims the goal of his epic, The Faerie Queene, is “to fashion a gentleman”—that is, to make a person from a poem. What would it mean to think... (read more)

36178

Cortez, José

This course will examine the cultural and literary discourses emerging from the locus of the U.S./Mexico border, a space of postnational political conflict... (read more)

36203

ENG 240 introduces students to central concepts and essential texts in disability studies and applies them to literary and cultural texts, with a focus on... (read more)

36316

Alilunas, Peter

People respond to movies in different ways, and there are many reasons for this. We have all stood in the lobby of a theater and heard conflicting opinions... (read more)

36317

Ok, HyeRyoung

Introduction to the analysis of form and style in cinema and related media, focusing on narrative, mise-en-scène, cinematography, editing, and sound. Multilisted with CINE 260M.

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36318

McGuffie, Allison

This course studies works of film and media as aesthetic objects that engage with communities identified by class, gender, race, ethnicity, and sexuality. It... (read more)

36343

Kelp-Stebbins, Kate

This course provides an introduction to the analysis of comics and graphic narratives in terms of their poetics, genres, forms, history, and the academic... (read more)

36433

Wojcik, Daniel

Introduces students to the theories and methods used in the study of folklore and popular culture; examines a diversity of approaches to the description and analysis of “common culture,” including popular narratives, legends, rituals, carnivalesque events, subcultures, and the commodification of... (read more)

36437

Sayre, Gordon

In this course we study car collecting and customizing as vernacular art traditions, and survey of some of the astonishing... (read more)

36446

Wojcik, Daniel

Participants in this class will explore current and longstanding issues in the study of "folk" or vernacular art. The first portion of the course will be... (read more)

36747

Barter, Faith

Feminist Jurisprudence provides an analysis and critique of women's position in patriarchal society and examines the nature and extent of women's subordination. It explores the role of law in maintaining and perpetuating patriarchy. This course will trace literary representations of women over... (read more)

36860

Upton, Corbett

WR 321 offers practice in writing and analyzing communication common to business, industry, and related professions. It is suggested for students... (read more)

22768

Rovak, Angela

In this course, you will learn how to identify, interpret, and form arguments about the elements of literary fiction. We will focus on the literary representations of black girlhood in texts that span the 20th and 21st centuries. In ENG 104: Introduction to Fiction we will read the stories of... (read more)

22772

Tiwari, Avinnash

Through this course, students develop analytical skills that will allow them to think, write, and speak intelligently about fiction. The course addresses basic questions about the nature of prose narrative and the interrelated activities of reading, writing, and interpretation. What is a story,... (read more)

22773

Carroll, Anna

This course offers a thorough introduction to the art of poetry, from Shakespeare to Kendrick Lamar, and considers the aesthetic and cultural investments we... (read more)

22778

Carroll, Anna

Public Speaking as a Liberal Art gives students a foundation in the classical principles of Rhetoric and teaches application of these arts to contemporary... (read more)

22779

Dawson, Brent

Comedy as a genre has long been associated with low forms of pleasure, whether the delight we take in bodily functions and malfunctions, shameful and... (read more)

22782

Fickle, Tara

Grammar is the language we use to talk about language. It’s a tool for describing how written sentences work and figuring out and explaining why they don’t... (read more)

22796

Bovilsky, Lara; Peppis, Paul; Saunders, Ben

ENG 302 is the second part of the year-long Foundations of the English Major series, but may be taken even if students have not taken... (read more)

22803

Frank, David

Analysis and use of patterns of reasoning derived from the disciplines of rhetoric, informal logic, cognitive science, and... (read more)

22811

Myers, Kate

ENG 399 Writing Associates Development is a variable-credit, hybrid, companion course designed to support tutors in ENG 404 Internship for Writing... (read more)

22824

Whalan, Mark

This course examines U.S. culture of the "jazz age" (1910-1935), a period of dramatic social change and lively experimentation in multiple forms of culture. We... (read more)

22830

Cortez, José

One of the analytical and political goals of the field of rhetoric is to describe the power relations of the social text—to explain the rhetorical and... (read more)

22934

Brousseau, Marcel

This course introduces students to the fields of Chicanx and Latinx Studies. Drawing from historical, literary, philosophical, cartographic, ethnographic, and visual texts, it can serve as a foundation for students wanting to pursue more advanced courses in Chicanx, Latinx, and Ethnic Studies.... (read more)

23087

Dugaw, Dianne

This course traces ethnicity, cultural interaction, and forms of folkloristic expression in the British Isles and Ireland. Britain and Ireland possess a... (read more)

26626

Wakefield, Eleanor

Emphasis on form, function, and style of scientific, professional and technical writing: weekly writing assignments include proposals, reports, definitions,... (read more)

26627

Boscha, Tina

Practice in writing and analyzing internal and external messages common to business, industry, and professions. Suggested for business and management students... (read more)

26648

Wood, Mary

What are the meanings of and responses to human suffering in an increasingly globalized world? How are those meanings and responses... (read more)

26950

Wojcik, Daniel

Introduces the study of beliefs about the supernatural by examining diverse approaches to the description and analysis of belief traditions and religious... (read more)

27044

Filo, Gina

Many of Shakespeare's early plays are romantic comedies, a genre that was and remains easy to dismiss as simplistic and idealized. However, under the... (read more)

27045

Cortez, José

This course will introduce students to the study of basic sentence mechanics, conventions, and grammatical terminology. Additionally, The course covers various... (read more)

27046

Laskaya, C. Anne

This course provides students an exposure to English and French literature important for the English literary tradition, in modern translations, from the very... (read more)

27047

Barter, Faith

This course is a survey of writings by African American authors of the 19th and 20th centuries. Studying fiction, essays, and poetry, we’ll close read representative texts to identify formal and thematic elements that characterize the African American literary tradition. We will consider how... (read more)

27067

Dawson, Brent

Students in this course will closely read Shakespeare’s plays and poems, attending to Shakespeare’s rich language, nuanced characters, and persistent... (read more)

27084

Wonham, Henry

Students in this class will read and discuss the major works of Samuel L. Clemens, aka Mark Twain. Readings will include Roughing It, The Adventures of Tom... (read more)

27112

What is “Black marxism”: How does such a perspective define “marxism,” and what makes Black radicalism different? How does the latter define, and how is... (read more)

27134

Rust, Stephen

This course explores the fundamentals of film and media aesthetics, including narrative, mise-en-scène, cinematography, editing, and... (read more)

27135

Wilde, Jenée

Aliens, monsters, killer robots, mutants.... Such metaphors may express cultural fears of the “other” that underlie social prejudice, intolerance, and... (read more)

27136

Mastrostefano, Stephanie

This course will introduce you to the formal and narrative study of film. We will focus on film history, the technology of film production, and the methodology... (read more)

27349

What happens to literature when text moves from page to screen? This online, team-taught course invites students of all majors and... (read more)

27574

Steinhart, Daniel

This course explores the fundamentals of film and media aesthetics, including narrative, mise-en-scène, cinematography, editing, and... (read more)

27689

Laskaya, C. Anne

This course offers students an exploration of a narrative genre that eventually gives rise to the novel, to fantasy literature, and even to science fiction... (read more)

27691

Li, David

This is an introductory class to literature. As such, it emphasizes the double meanings inherent in literature’s etymological origin, “literacy.” We shall develop the competency to  “read” and “write” about the kind of texts that are considered “literary,” and more specifically about a type of... (read more)

27692

Li, David

Reading important writers of Asian American descent, this class is concerned with the following: 1. Where is Asian America? 2. What is an Asian American? Is it... (read more)

27698

Saxon, Rebecca

This course will explore multicultural youth literature, covering literature for ages 0 to young adult. Students will engage with literature that represents a... (read more)

27786

Wakefield, Eleanor

Emphasis on form, function, and style of scientific, professional and technical writing: weekly writing assignments include proposals, reports, definitions,... (read more)

27790

Myers, Kate

A survey course is, by its very nature, an incomplete project which must be
selective. Instead of worrying about a 'complete picture' of world
literature, let us instead think of ourselves as explorers or 'surveyors,'
using literary texts as fixed points with which we might... (read more)

12150

Smars, Bjorn

Actual reading lists vary significantly depending on the expertise and teaching philosophy of the instructor, but all sections of the course offer students a broad introduction to the study of literary fiction. Whether readings focus on the stories and novels of major writers or on works from a... (read more)

12151

Kovalchuk, Anna; Huang, Helen

Actual reading lists vary significantly depending on the expertise and teaching philosophy of the instructor, but all sections of the course offer students a broad introduction to the study of literary fiction. Whether readings focus on the stories and novels of major writers or on works from a... (read more)

12152

Kovalchuk, Anna

Actual reading lists vary significantly depending on the expertise and teaching philosophy of the instructor, but all sections of the course offer students a broad introduction to the study of literary fiction. Whether readings focus on the stories and novels of major writers or on works from a... (read more)

12153

Wright, Paula

Poetry ENG 106 is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of the formal properties of poetry in English. Through careful analysis poems by major writers, such as Plath, Whitman, Dickinson, McKay, Lee, Bishop, Brooks and many others, students will be challenged to explain not only... (read more)

12154

Shankman, Steven

We will read foundational works from three different ancient cultures: China, Greece, and Israel. We will pay particular attention to the question of the kinds of values that these foundational works were meant to instill in their ancient audiences. What does each culture have to say about... (read more)

12158

Laskaya, C. Anne

Listening rigorously and deeply, inquiring into issues and topics of importance to our communities, and speaking effectively are key elements that assist our lives in any relationship, team-task, and group.  They are also crucial for a democracy to function and to improve.  Course readings,... (read more)

12160

Dawson, Brent

Students read, discuss, and critique Shakespeare's early comedies and tragedies. Plays covered generally include (but are not limited to) A Mid-Summer Night's Dream, The Merchant of Venice, Henry IV (Part One), Richard II, Henry V, Julius Caesar... (read more)

12163

Sayre, Gordon

The goal of this course is to learn to analyze the structure of English sentences, or syntax. The method is sentence diagramming, a technique for identifying and separating the elements of a sentence, the subject, object, verb, conjunctions and clauses, in a graphic arrangement. We will only... (read more)

12165

Whalan, Mark

This course is a survey of writings by African American authors. Studying fiction, essays, and poetry, we'll close read representative texts to identify formal and thematic elements that characterize the African American literary tradition. We will consider how these works exemplify and... (read more)

12176

Kelp-Stebbins, Kate

This course provides an introduction to the analysis of comics and graphic narratives in terms of their poetics, genres, forms, history, and the academic discipline of Comics Studies. Our multifaceted examination will balance close reading with in-depth research and analysis of the development... (read more)

12177

Peppis, Paul

ENG 301 is the first part of the year-long Foundations of the English Major series. English 301 will study literary and cultural texts with a focus on the following questions: What is a cultural context? How are cultural contexts tied to the historical imagination? To answer these questions,... (read more)

12186

Whalan, Mark

This course will examine a variety of texts that engage the modern state–its functions and possibilities; its ability to repress and coerce; its ability to forge new and enduring kinds of social connection; and what place, if any, it allows for literary culture.

It will examine some of the... (read more)

12195

Bergquist, Carolyn

We are going to look very closely at sentences to see how they work, how the individual parts of speech draw together into syntax, and what effect (artistic and otherwise) these patterns of syntax create. The course will mix technical study of sentence structure and reflection upon the artful... (read more)

12196

Bayless, Martha

This is a course in learning to read and understand Old English, the language of the Anglo-Saxons (the English between 449 and 1066).  We will read some riddles and a wisdom text that tells you everything a tenth-century English warrior or devout maiden needed to know, and in addition learn a... (read more)

12497

An introduction to contemporary folklore studies, with emphasis on the meanings of stories, rituals, festivals, body art, subcultures, the supernatural, street art, Internet folklore, and other forms of vernacular expression as these relate to a diversity of social identities and cultural... (read more)

15979

WR 312 Principles of Tutoring Writing is the gateway course into the Writing Associates Program, in which selected English majors and minors with demonstrated excellence as writers serve as writing tutors for students enrolled in lower-division English, Composition, and possibly Honors... (read more)

15980

Emphasis on form, function, and style of scientific, professional, and technical writing; weekly writing assignments include proposals, reports, definitions, instructions, summaries. Use of documentation in publication.

Prereq: completion of university writing requirement; junior standing... (read more)

15981

Practice in writing and analyzing internal and external messages common to business, industry, and professions. Suggested for business and management students.

Prereq: completion of university writing requirement; junior standing.

(read more)
16070

Bohls, Elizabeth

Since remote antiquity, for all sorts of reasons, people of many kinds have left home and hit the road. Journeys have always been a part of life, and travel writing has a long and varied history. We will read a wide range of travel accounts while asking what shared features define travel writing... (read more)

16078

Simnitt, Emily

What does it mean to be at home? How does it feel to lose one's home?

And how do ideas of home and homelessness shape our sense of self or security? This course builds on these questions to look at a collection of literary works that focus explicitly on the idea of home in American culture... (read more)

16079

Upton, Corbett

ENG 300 offers an introduction to literary criticism. This course will acquaint you with many of the important issues and debates in literary studies and introduce you to various theoretical schools with examples of each type. We will engage two introductory texts to literary and cultural theory... (read more)

16081

Brundan, Katherine

This course circulates through the world of the novel by taking a slightly unusual perspective: that of subjects and objects. When the novel emerged in eighteenth-century England, “novels increased more than tea,” as Franco Moretti explains. Novels were the product of a commercial and leisured... (read more)

16083

Kelp-Stebbins, Kate

Comics and graphic narratives are uniquely suited to exploring cultural location because they transform the storytelling unit of the page into a space of representation. The comics page graphically negotiates dynamics of home and away, self and other, as well as race and culture. In this course... (read more)

16085

Kaufman, Heidi

Novels written by the Brontë sisters—Jane Eyre and Villette by Charlotte Brontë (1816-1855), Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë (1818-1848), and Agnes Grey and The Tenant of Wildfell Hall by Anne Brontë (1820-1849)—have remained a significant part of... (read more)

16455

Brown, Kirby

In 1968, Kiowa writer N. Scott Momaday's House Made of Dawn was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for American literature. Momaday's award signaled for many the “arrival” of Native authors to the American literary scene, and ushered in an unprecedented era of Native literary production widely... (read more)

16456

Myers, Kate

Shakespeare’s later plays seem to be keenly aware of the power and influence of theatre. In selfreflexive characters we might categorize as lovers, fools, and madmen, his plays confront the political and social concerns of his original audiences, concerns that continue to challenge us today,... (read more)

16458

Barter, Faith

In the decades leading up to the Civil War, it was illegal for slaves to learn how to read or write. It was illegal for them to testify in court, except against each other or to confess a crime. In the North, free African Americans often did not fare much better: there they were susceptible to... (read more)

16459

Rossi, William

According to Wendell Berry, “You don’t know who you are until you know where you are.” Yet, for other people in our history and in our own day, the lived experience of place that Berry rightly values varies according to who other people think you are and where they think you should... (read more)

16778

This course is an introduction to film and media studies and various methods of critical analysis. In this course, we will see that there are many productive ways of thinking about movies and many approaches we can use to analyze them. These approaches include the study of narrative structure,... (read more)

16943

McGuffie, Allison

This course studies works of film and media as representational objects that engage with communities identified by intersectional categories including sex,... (read more)

16947

LeMenager, Stephanie

Time travel through the history of the science fiction genre from the early modern era to the current moment as we learn about how Sci Fi came to be what is arguably the most socially engaged form of fiction. We'll consider Sci Fi that draws on the hard sciences, on the social sciences, and... (read more)

16950

Brousseau, Marcel

As an introductory survey, this course emphasizes the formal, thematic, and cultural diversity of Latinx literature. We will read novels, poetry, short stories, and comics, among other media, by authors from a range of identities—including Mexican American, Central American, Cuban American, and... (read more)

16967

Study of the history of institutions and industries that shape production and reception of film and media.

(read more)
17023

Warren, Joyce Pualani

Liminal Form(s): Ethnic American Short Fiction

This course will examine Ethnic American short fiction, paying particular attention to the ways its structure and content uphold and contest literary, corporeal, and national form(s).... (read more)

17063

Myers, Kate

ENG 399 Writing Associates Development is a variable-credit, hybrid, companion class to ENG 404 Internship for Writing Associates. As such,... (read more)

17074

Gopal, Sangita

This course will build on our abilities to watch, analyze and write about media objects, particularly film. We will learn to recognize, define and elaborate on various kinds of cinema (fiction, documentary etc), genres (musical, western, horror etc), elements of narrative (script, plot, point of... (read more)

17076

Ok, HyeRyoung

This course examines the fundamental elements of film and media aesthetics, including narrative, mise-en- scène, cinematography, genre, editing, and sound. By learning how to analyze and interpret film form by utilizing proper cinematic language, students will develop critical understanding of... (read more)

40801

Myers, Kate

Madness, truth, honor, pity—these are a few of the concepts Shakespeare explores in his earliest plays. We will scrutinize the representations of these ideas and others that emerge in plots of political intrigue, tyranny, rebellion, and vengeance. Working within this frame, we will attempt to... (read more)

40804

Clevinger, Kara

Who is the American “I”? Rugged individualism has long been central to American identity and culture, but what perspectives and possibilities are excluded from the “I” crafted by male writers like Benjamin Franklin, Henry David Thoreau, Frederick Douglass, and Ernest Hemingway? In our course we... (read more)

40808

Vázquez, David J

ENG 392 is the second of two-part, upper division chronological survey of the American novel from its beginnings in the 19th century to the present. ENG 392 covers the period from the early 20th century to the present. No prerequisites are required, but students should be capable of advanced... (read more)

40890

Bayless, Martha

This course is an examination of the period often considered the most “magical,” the Middle Ages. Looking at the practices of medieval western Europe, particularly Britain, we will examine how medieval culture defined magic, what they hoped to achieve by practicing (or forbidding) magic, and how... (read more)

42073

Introduces students to the theories and methods used in the study of folklore and popular culture; examines a diversity of approaches to the description and analysis of “common culture,” including popular narratives, legends, rituals, ethnic and gender stereotypes, carnivalesque events, fan... (read more)

42249

Clark, Stephanie

This course explores 4 texts produced by the three major cultures inhabiting the British Isles in the early Middle Ages: the Táin bo Culainge for the Irish; the Saga of the Volsungs (written in Iceland) for the Danes; and Genesis and Beowulf for the Anglo-... (read more)

42251

Clevinger, Kara

The novel as a newer literary genre was a powerful, even potentially dangerous force in the newly-formed American nation. One 1838 critic declared that “the object of novelists in general appears to be to seize the public mind, and hold it with a sort of enchantment.” What captivated and... (read more)

42252

Gazaille, Brian

This class explores how black women writers of the twentieth century have taken up the themes of time, memory, and identity. These writers often conceived of literature as a project of memory and recovery, a place, as Ntzoake Shange puts it in Sassafrass, Cypress, & Indigo, for... (read more)

42419

Casimir, Ulrick

Focusing primarily on American/Hollywood filmmaking from the late 1960s through today, this course looks closely at the representation and function of African-Americans and women in film. Using both mainstream and independent films as our primary texts, we will explore how African-Americans and... (read more)

42420

Wilde, Jenée

Aliens, monsters, killer androids, mutants.... Such metaphors may express cultural fears of the “other” that underlie social prejudice, intolerance, and discrimination. But viewers and fans may also read against the grain of normative cinematic images, finding identity and affirmation in the... (read more)

42421

This course will build on our abilities to watch, analyze and write about media objects, particularly film. We will learn to recognize, define and elaborate on various kinds of cinema (fiction, documentary etc.), genres (musical, western, horror etc.), elements of narrative (script, plot, point... (read more)

42422

Rust, Stephen

“Survey of U.S. Cinema": We will screen a sampling of films associated with U.S./American cinema through its relatively short history since the sound era—-beginning with important “genres,” progressing into cinematic “modes,” and ultimately examining how movies in our national context reflect... (read more)

42454

Brown, Kirby

In 1968, Kiowa writer N. Scott Momaday's House Made of Dawn was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for American literature. Momaday's award signaled for many the “arrival” of Native authors to the American literary scene, and ushered in an unprecedented era of Native literary production widely... (read more)

42456

Boscha, Tina

Emphasis on form, function, and style of scientific, professional, and technical writing; weekly writing assignments include proposals, reports, definitions, instructions, summaries. Use of documentation in publication.

Prereq: completion of university writing requirement; junior standing... (read more)

42457

This class is conceived as an introduction to the art of comics, and to the methodologies of the new academic discipline of Comics Studies. Course content will vary from term to term, according to the specialist interests of the individual instructor, within the following parameters. Students... (read more)

42458

Upton, Corbett

ENG 395 provides selective survey of contemporary literature between 1945 and the present. The course incorporates works of prose, poetry, and drama, and attends closely to philosophical, political, and cultural events that run parallel to developments in twentieth-century literary history. No... (read more)

42459

O'Kelly, Brendan

This class will focus on crime noir, a somewhat loosely defined genre of fiction, comic, and film. Unlike detective fiction, hardboiled crime noir centers on criminal protagonists, often of the "career" variety. Tracing the trajectory of such a genre from its inception in 1920s hardboiled pulp... (read more)

32001

Rovak, Angela

This course will focus on the literary representations of black girlhood. In ENG 104: Introduction to Fiction we will read the stories of young black women as they move through the difficult transition from childhood to adulthood. We will read novels and short stories that show a diversity of... (read more)

32002

Floyd, Courtney

In English 104, “Archetypes and Anarchy,” we will explore the basic elements of fiction via one of its most enduring forms: the fairy tale. As the course title indicates, we will begin by considering the archetype, a concept derived from Jungian psychology which refers to “a pervasive idea,... (read more)

32005

Graman, Claire

Today it’s easier than ever to access media through streaming services like Netflix, Hulu, and Amazon Prime, yet their selection of films made before 1980 is surprisingly sparse. Where are these classic films and why should we care? This course will introduce you to cinema studies, including... (read more)

32007

Crosswhite, James

While the primary emphasis of this course will be students’ frequent practice and evaluation of their own public speaking, we will also discuss theories of rhetoric; the identity, characteristics, and relationship of speaker (self) and audience (other); the importance of listening as an aspect... (read more)

32008

Bovilsky, Lara

This course will survey the long history of stories about the creation of artificial men and women. We’ll look at the desires expressed by this genre, most of all, the desire to perfect or eliminate what is most human. Familiar questions – can robots feel? can we tell who is a robot? – will be... (read more)

32009

Peppis, Paul

Genre courses focus on particular genres and forms crucial for the study of English, American, and Anglophone literature and culture and are aimed primarily at English majors. This course on tragedy traces the historical development and transformation of the genre and places strong emphasis on... (read more)

32010

Myers, Kate

Late Shakespeare

In self-reflexive characters we might categorize as lovers, fools, and madmen, the later plays of Shakespeare confront the political and social concerns of his original audiences, concerns that continue to challenge us today, including issues of gender, race, class, and... (read more)

32013

Thorsson, Courtney

This course is a survey of writings by African American authors. Studying fiction, essays, and poetry, we will read representative texts to consider whether there are specific formal and thematic elements that characterize an African American literary tradition. We will consider how these texts... (read more)

32015

Steinhart, Daniel

Media Aesthetics (ENG 260) teaches the vocabulary required to formally analyze cinema and related media, with an emphasis on narrative, mise-en-scène, cinematography, editing, and sound. Students will learn to identify, define, and apply key vocabulary used to describe and analyze the aesthetics... (read more)

32016

Gopal, Sangita

ENG 267, the third of three courses that study the historical evolution of cinema as an institution and as an art form from its origin, covers the time period from the “end” of the studio system in the 1960s to the present day. It may be taken individually or as part of a series (with ENG 265... (read more)

32025

Bohls, Elizabeth

The novel as we know it today did not exist until the early nineteenth century, the end point of this course. Before then, fictional prose narratives circulated in Britain under various labels, including “romance,” “history,” “true history” or “secret history,” as well as “novel.” Moreover, the... (read more)

32027

Frank, David

In this course we will examine theories of reasoned-based argumentation in the oral mode, and then incorporate those theories into the practice of making effective speeches that advocate for particular positions on arguable issues of public concern. We will analyze and critique oral arguments as... (read more)

32030

This course introduces students to the manner in which South Africans have been represented through fiction, documentary, and experimental films from the pre-apartheid to the post-apartheid eras. We will focus specifically on representations of blackness in South Africa in order to understand... (read more)

32031

Miller, Quinn

This course introduces students to critical thinking about the historical and economic factors influencing film, media, and cultural production in Hollywood and in response to Hollywood. Unconventional textual and contextual dynamics, understood as queer history, are the focus of the course,... (read more)

32040

Upton, Corbett

Credited with inaugurating the Harlem Renaissance and inspiring the Negrítude movement, Claude McKay is best known as America’s most important protest sonneteer. McKay’s storied literary career documents the life of a black expatriate modern and his sense of the Black Atlantic experience during... (read more)

32041

Laskaya, C. Anne

ENG 427 invites students to engage selections from Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales. Texts will include the more familiar comedic tales, like the Miller’s Tale but also the less familiar elegiacphilosophic, beast fable and several highly problematic tales, like the ... (read more)

32042

Clark, Stephanie

This course will use the tools and knowledge acquired in previous terms of Old English to read the monsters section of Beowulf in Old English with critical and philological skill. We will pay attention to language, literary, and scholarly issues, and assignments will especially focus on... (read more)

32045

Crosswhite, James

In this course, you will review and explore important concepts in rhetoric and argumentation theory, and you will gain skill in discovering the questions that drive controversies and the arguments that can be made on all the different sides of an issue. You will also practice speaking, writing,... (read more)

35704

Boscha, Tina

Emphasis on form, function, and style of scientific, professional and technical writing: weekly writing assignments include proposals, reports, definitions, instructions, summaries. Use of documentation in publication. Junior standing required. Prerequisite: completion of UO writing requirement... (read more)

35708

Wilde, Jenée

An assumption persists in writing courses that academic and literary essays are distinct -  critical writers formulate arguments and manage subjective experiences with facts for the sake of accuracy or correctness, while literary writers endeavor to capture the idiosyncrasies of their... (read more)

35961

This course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of the formal properties of poetry in English. Through careful analysis of poems by major writers, students will be challenged to explain not only what a given poem might mean to its readers, but also how a poem communicates... (read more)

35962

Brown, Kirby

In 1968, Kiowa writer N. Scott Momaday’s House Made of Dawn was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for American literature. Momaday’s award signaled for many the “arrival” of Native authors to the American literary scene, and ushered in an unprecedented era of Native literary production widely... (read more)

35966

This discussion section is a supplement to the lecture course that meets TR each week. The focus of ENG 303 as the final course in the Foundations sequence is on close/slow reading. Having established contextual and theoretical approaches to literature, we now turn to the process of close and... (read more)

35967

This discussion section is a supplement to the lecture course that meets TR each week. The focus of ENG 303 as the final course in the Foundations sequence is on close/slow reading. Having established contextual and theoretical approaches to literature, we now turn to the process of close and... (read more)

35968

Saxon, Rebecca

This course will explore multicultural youth literature, covering literature for ages 0 to young adult. Students will engage with literature that represents a diversity of cultures, ethnicities, and backgrounds, primarily in the American context. We will read books such as Brown Girl... (read more)

35969

Warren, Joyce Pualani

This course will examine Native women’s fiction, paying particular attention to the ways its form and content uphold and contest terms like “feminism,” “fiction,” and “native.” The central concern of this course is Native women’s textual representations of their bodies and voices, both physical... (read more)

35970

Whalan, Mark

African American Authors of the Harlem Renaissance

This course will examine the work of three major African American authors: Claude McKay, Zora Neale Hurston, and Langston Hughes. These three did much to set the tone of the flourishing of black literary culture after World World One known... (read more)

35971

Li, David

This class is a selective and sweeping reading of four novels that span from the 1920s to 2000. It covers the geographic regions of American northeast and the Deep South by authors of black, white, and Jewish descent. Nearly all of the texts on the reading list are classic and canonical 20th... (read more)

35974

LeMenager, Stephanie

This course begins with the question of what is the American novel? It is a question asked and answered by some of the most ingenious and challenging thinkers of the 20th century, who, as it turns out, were novelists. But for these thinkers who thought in the form of novels, the 20th century was... (read more)

35975

Wheeler, Elizabeth (Betsy)

This theater class is a great chance to branch out into creative work and community involvement. UO students create and perform a play together with adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities from the Eugene-Springfield community. Tell stories from your life, work on the script,... (read more)

35976

Gershow, Miriam

In this course, we will study the works of contemporary fiction writers and then meet with the writers to directly engage them in ideas about their work.  Visiting writers to ENG 399 in Spring 18 include Danielle Evans, Andre Dubus III, Laila Lalami and Peter Hoffmeister.  Students will... (read more)

35991

Thorsson, Courtney

In this course, we will study selected writings of Toni Morrison in their historical, political, and literary contexts. In addition to Morrison’s work as a novelist, we will consider her work as a literary scholar, editor, and advocate for and representative of contemporary African American... (read more)

35994

Saunders, Ben

In this class we will map the path of the American comic book superhero and explore the ways in which that journey reflects larger processes of social change. We will consider these superheroes not only as expressions of an ancient mythic heroic tradition, but also as distinctly “modern”... (read more)

35996

Wojcik, Daniel

Examines the research questions and theoretical models used by folklorists and other scholars in the study of vernacular religion and popular spirituality. We will examine religion and spirituality as it is “lived,” focusing primarily on beliefs and practices that are informally learned and... (read more)

35997

Miller, Quinn

This course analyzes situation comedies about consumer culture as works of art that explore U.S. cultural politics from a queer perspective. Examining sitcoms as inquiries into privilege and inequality, we discuss aesthetics, the economics of the media industries, the interdisciplinary field of... (read more)

36001

Brown, Kirby

There is perhaps no image more widely recognized yet more grossly misunderstood in American popular culture than the “Indian.” Across a variety of discursive forms, “the Indian” has been represented as everything from an irredeemable savage and an impediment to progress to an idealized figure of... (read more)

36014

Wonham, Henry

This course is an introduction to drama, one of the major genres in literary studies. Students will read, discuss, and analyze plays from a variety of periods and national traditions in order to become familiar with the major styles, techniques, and conventions that characterize dramatic... (read more)

36290

In this seminar, professional comics writer Jen Van Meter (Hopeless SavagesThe Death Defying Doctor Mirage) will help students explore the function and demands of the script as a technical tool in the process of making contemporary comics. Readings will include professional... (read more)

36674

Brundan, Katherine

The Language of Novels

This course will focus on the politics of language in nineteenth-century novels, exploring elements such as translation, “primitive” language, philology, the spoken/unspoken, and different registers of dialogue. We will encounter novels that imagine various... (read more)

36676

Pyle, Forest

This course will be a sustained examination of the question: “What is Romanticism? This is a question which has no single or ultimate answer given that there seem to be as many answers as there are “askers.” There is, however, a rich and complex body of literature and critical commentary to... (read more)

36757

Wood, Mary

In this online course, we will read four novels that span the time period from the early twentieth century to the present day, interpreting each novel in relation to its historical and cultural contexts. While the selected novels cannot fully represent the vast range of ethnically and culturally... (read more)

36784

Li, David

Reading Asian American texts as a form of cultural representation, the class will be concerned with the following:

  1. Where is Asian America? What are its geographical, social, and epistemological boundaries?
  2. What is Asian American? Is it a racial concept, cultural construct,... (read more)
36809

Myers, Kate

ENG 399 Special Studies: Writing Associates is a variable-credit, hybrid, companion course designed to support tutors in ENG 404 Internship for Writing Associates. The course focuses on the professional development of the Writing Associates and their continuing study of the practice and ethics... (read more)

22712

Wheeler, Elizabeth (Betsy)

Why do stories matter? In this class we will read novels of childhood and adolescence, both fantasy and realistic, and compare them to the stories that matter in our own lives and families. The novels come from India, England, South Korea, and the United States. By the end of the course you... (read more)

22713

Bostrom, Margaret

This course will address a theme within contemporary U.S. experimental literature. Course readings may include graphic novels, novels in verse, micro fiction, or narrative video games. We will address foundational questions about the nature of prose narrative by reading texts that push the... (read more)

22714

Rovak, Angela

This course will focus on the literary representations of black girlhood. In ENG 104: Introduction to Fiction we will read the stories of young black women as they move through the difficult transition from childhood to adulthood. We will read novels and short stories that show a diversity of... (read more)

22717

Saunders, Ben

This course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of the formal properties of poetry in English. Through careful analysis of poems by major writers, students will be challenged to explain not only what a given poem might mean to its readers, but also how a poem communicates... (read more)

22719

Graman, Claire

This course will introduce you to cinema studies, including history, culture, analysis, theory, aesthetics, and production, through the lens of genre. Why are there certain genres of film and what do they say about our culture? By examining classic and contemporary films within the western,... (read more)

22723

LeRud, Lizzy

This course explores the art of public speaking as grounded in theories of rhetoric, especially those pertaining to the relationship of a speaker to an audience, the importance of listening as an aspect of speaking, and the socioethical contexts of public discourse. Assignments and activities... (read more)

22724

Wood, Mary

This course will examine the development of autobiography as a literary genre from the spiritual narratives of medieval women mystics to the graphic memoirs of twenty-first century writers. Along the way we will consider a range of autobiographical forms, including slave narrative, immigrant... (read more)

22726

Pyle, Forest

This course, which focuses on four of the later plays of Shakespeare’s career, is designed as an introduction to the language, themes, contexts, and implications of Shakespeare’s most mature work. Though our close reading of these plays will lead us to consider any number of the many topics... (read more)

22727

Curry, Elizabeth

This course will introduce students to literature that depicts ‘the environment’ in various ways: as resplendent landscape, as increasingly industrialized space, as ecologically compromised animal habitat, and as chemically altered agricultural swath. This course will read fiction, nonfiction,... (read more)

22729

Miller, Quinn

This course develops critical reading and research skills. It introduces technical vocabulary for analyzing the form of moving image texts in the study of media aesthetics. We address material objects and cultural history related to media technology, looking at print culture, audiobook, still... (read more)

22730

Gopal, Sangita

This course aims to develop your media literacy by providing you with a precise set of critical tools for analyzing moving image texts. Although our primary focus will be on the formal analysis of image and sound rather than media history or social issues, we will study the interplay between... (read more)

22731

Rust, Stephen

This is the second course in a three-term sequence that studies the evolution of cinema as an art form and economic and cultural institution. English 266 continues from the end of the silent film era early 1960s. The aim of the course is to develop interpretive skills relevant to the study of... (read more)

22742

Frank, David

Analysis and use of patterns of reasoning derived from the disciplines of rhetoric, informal logic, cognitive science, and the theory of argumentation.

(read more)
22743

Brown, Kirby

Cherokee/Choctaw scholar Louis Owens declared that all Native novels are centrally occupied with recovering and (re)articulating an Indigenous sense of identity from within the discursive and linguistic contexts of colonialism. For Owens, this inherently dialogic process draws heavily on... (read more)

22746

Gopal, Sangita

Study of film and media as aesthetic objects that engage with communities identified by class, gender, race, ethnicity, and sexuality.

(read more)
22758

Wonham, Henry

Students in ENG 407, “Poetry and Pragmatism,” the St. Louis Seminar in Poetry, will read, discuss, and write about major American poetry of the 19th, 20th, and 21st centuries using the philosophical lens of pragmatism to guide their inquiry.  The course will prioritize poetry by Emily Dickinson... (read more)

22762

Clark, Stephanie

OEII builds on the grammatical foundations learned in OEI and adds to students’ knowledge of Anglo-Saxon literature and culture through reading a varied selection of shorter poems and prose in Old English and performing a version of Bede’s story of Cædmon. In addition, OEII continues to... (read more)

22766

Fickle, Tara

Study of media emerging from computer-based digital techniques, including digital cinema, cyborgs, interactive games, multiplayer online simulations, and viral videos. Offered alternate years.

(read more)
26480

O'Kelly, Brendan

Emphasis on form, function, and style of scientific, professional and technical writing: weekly writing assignments include proposals, reports, definitions, instructions, summaries. Use of documentation in publication. Junior standing required. Prerequisite: completion of UO... (read more)

26481

Upton, Corbett

Practice in writing and analyzing internal and external messages common to business, industry, and professions. Suggested for business and management students.

WR 321 offers practice in writing and analyzing communication common to business, industry, and related professions. Students will... (read more)

26577

Wald, Sarah D

We will explore issues related to food production and consumption through fictional and non-fictional representations of farmers and farmworkers in contemporary U.S. literature and culture. We will look at food production, food distribution, and food access through the lens of agriculture,... (read more)

26808

Shankman, Steven

English 108 is the second quarter of a year-long survey of World Literature, between antiquity and the modern period. In European literature, this period includes the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. Rather than sample a smattering of various texts from this period, we will read a single great... (read more)

26809

Pyle, Forest

From the Early Modern lyric poetry of Shakespeare and Donne through the “lyrical ballads,” songs, and odes of British Romanticism and the American lyrical experiments of Dickinson and Whitman and the work of modernist and post-modernist lyric poets to the “lyrics” of our contemporary popular... (read more)

26825

Sayre, Gordon

The goal of this course is to learn to analyze the structure of English sentences, or syntax. The method is sentence diagramming, a technique for identifying and separating the elements of a sentence, the subject, object, verb, conjunctions and clauses, in a graphic arrangement. We will only... (read more)

26826

Warren, Joyce Pualani

What story does your body tell? Beyond the assumptions others may make based on physical appearance, or what you might convey through adornment, what narrative does your body perpetuate? The Proto Polynesian word “tatau” (tattoo) is both a noun, the physical mark inscribed on the body, and a... (read more)

26827

Li, David

This class is a sampling of American writing by its ethnic and racial minority writers. Generically speaking, we shall devote ourselves to prose fiction and non-fiction.

(read more)
26828

Ginsberg, Warren; Kaufman, Heidi

English 302 is one course of a three-course sequence that offers students an introduction to the discipline of English as it is practiced at the University of Oregon, encompassing the broad range of fields, forms, and textual concerns addressed by department researchers. Designed for students... (read more)

26833

Saxon, Rebecca

This course will explore multicultural youth literature, covering literature for ages 0 to young adult. Students will engage with literature that represents a diversity of cultures, ethnicities, and backgrounds, primarily in the American context. We will read books such as Brown Girl... (read more)

26834

Brundan, Katherine

The English Novel: Subject, Object and Abject

This course circulates through the world of the novel by taking a slightly unusual perspective: that of subjects and objects. The rise of the novel goes hand-in-hand with a focus on objects and commodities that help construct the subject as a... (read more)

26841

Wald, Sarah D

Latinx Literary Environmentalisms

Latinx literature and culture sit at the cutting edge of contemporary environmental thought. This class examines the intertwining of social and environmental justice in contemporary Latinx literature and cultural production, including fiction, film, and... (read more)

26842

Gazaille, Brian

Secret Agency: Navigating Race and Identity in Passing Fictions

While nineteenth-century America touted itself as a place where people could reinvent themselves as self-made, prosperous, fully enfranchised citizens, it was also the period when categories like race, gender, and class became... (read more)

26843

Bryant-Berg, Kristy

This course develops appreciation and understanding of 20th Century American novels by examining provocative samples exemplifying notable trends. We will explore both modernist roots reshaping the American novel and contemporary highlights challenging the novel’s form and complicating American... (read more)

26844

Wheeler, Elizabeth (Betsy)

One could say that most comics are about the human body, in all its variations, exaggerations, erotics, poses, powers, and vulnerabilities. This course looks at the human body in contemporary comics with particular attention to disability and gender. We’ll read 4 comics genres: anime, memoir,... (read more)

26850

Bovilsky, Lara

Participating in the political revolution, religious ferment, and literary experimentation of his time, the poetry and prose of John Milton offer us fascinating and beautiful examples of the engagement of literature with real-world political and ethical crises. This work may resonate with... (read more)

26851

Li, David

This is a single author study course on Jonathan Franzen, arguably the most important contemporary American novelist, one of the few who has made the cover of Time Magazine. Franzen shall visit our class in person towards the end of the term, and give a public reading as the Collins... (read more)

26852

Crosswhite, James

Rhetorical criticism is the appreciation and analysis of how we are persuaded—and often includes judgment concerning the nature of the persuasion. The course will address the following questions, among others: What is criticism? What is rhetoric? What is rhetorical criticism? What are its... (read more)

27212

Dugaw, Dianne

The complex cultural history of Great Britain and Ireland is the focus of this course. We study folk and popular traditions that are current or have been collected in this region, particularly noting how these influence art, literature, history, and socio-political institutions as well as... (read more)

27589

Bohls, Elizabeth

In 1797 the London Critical Review proclaimed, “This may be called the age of peregrination; for we have reason to believe, that the desire of seeing foreign countries never before so diffusively operated.”  British travelers circled the globe, pursuing exploration, trade, diplomacy,... (read more)

27607

Fickle, Tara

Asian American Comics

The growing acceptance of comics and graphic novels as “serious” literature owes much to the genre’s embrace as a powerful vehicle for memory, especially by minority writers seeking to showcase “non-normative” accounts of American life: the experiences of being gay,... (read more)

27672

Simnitt, Emily

What does it mean to be at home? How does it feel to lose one's home? And how do ideas of home and homelessness shape our sense of self or security? This course builds on these questions to look at a collection of literary works that focus explicitly on the idea of home in American culture. We'... (read more)

0

Wood, Mary

This course examines the ways madness, as lived experience and as social category, has been studied and represented across cultures and genres. As a mental illness, schizophrenia challenges conventional ways of knowing the relationships between mind and body, thought and perception, illness and... (read more)

0

Wood, Mary

This course examines the ways madness, as lived experience and as social category, has been studied and represented across cultures and genres. As a mental illness, schizophrenia challenges conventional ways of knowing the relationships between mind and body, thought and perception, illness and... (read more)

0

Dawson, Brent

Students in this course will closely read Shakespeare’s plays and poems, attending to their rich language, nuanced characters, and persistent fascination toward topics of the self, desire, imagination, and group identity. In the first part of the course, students will look at examples from... (read more)

0

Dawson, Brent

Students in this course will closely read Shakespeare’s plays and poems, attending to their rich language, nuanced characters, and persistent fascination toward topics of the self, desire, imagination, and group identity. In the first part of the course, students will look at examples from... (read more)

0

Clark, Stephanie

In a quiet corner of the Natural History Museum’s instrument gallery you find an unassuming object, graphite grey, small enough to fit in the hand, on a small pedestal. The placard reads: “Musical Instrument? Date: Unknown. Provenance: Unknown.” The placard directs you to hold it up to your ear... (read more)

0

COURSE OBJECTIVES: This is the first of a three-term sequence that studies how cinema historically evolved as both an institution and an art form. The aim of the course is to explore the history of world cinema’s beginnings and develop the critical and analytic skills to analyze particular film... (read more)

12126

McGuffie, Allison

Movies are often dismissed as mere popular entertainment. But the very pervasiveness of audio-visual media in our lives demands that we look more carefully at these cultural products. In fact, an entire field of study has developed to investigate the history and significance of moving picture... (read more)

12159

Clark, Stephanie

ENG 428/528 is a course in learning to read and understand Old English, the language of the Anglo-Saxons (the English between the years 449 and 1066). We will concentrate on language basics, creating a firm foundation for reading Old English literature in later courses, and enabling you to... (read more)

12464

Dugaw, Dianne

This course brings together readings of the Bible in the Judeo-Christian tradition with apt mythological, folkloristic, and traditional contexts, concepts, theories, and meanings. We will read sections of the Bible that have continuing presence in Western culture and literature, exploring how... (read more)

16310

Sayre, Gordon

In this course we study car collecting and customizing as vernacular art traditions, and survey of some of the astonishing range of human behaviors around cars and trucks. To better understand cars we also will learn of the history of the automotive industry, environmental issues arising from... (read more)

16311

Dugaw, Dianne

This course brings together readings of the Bible in the Judeo-Christian tradition with apt mythological, folkloristic, and traditional contexts, concepts, theories, and meanings. We will read sections of the Bible that have continuing presence in Western culture and literature, exploring how... (read more)

16940

Wood, Mary; Rovak, Angela

What are the meanings of and responses to human suffering in an increasingly globalized world? How are those meanings and responses inflected by race, class, gender, ethnicity, and national identity? How does Western biomedicine define disease and wellness (both now and historically) and how are... (read more)

16954

Bohls, Elizabeth

Slavery shaped the ecology, economy, and culture of the Atlantic Rim, including parts of Europe, Africa, and the Americas. In the long eighteenth century (1660-1838), British slavery on the Caribbean sugar islands reached its peak, was fought by the abolitionist movement and ended by Parliament... (read more)

40804

O'Kelly, Brendan

This course will introduce you to the discipline of Film Studies. We will focus on film history, the technology of film production, and the narrative conventions of filmmaking. Along with film itself, we will attend to the cultural, political, and economic contexts that produce it. To emphasize—... (read more)

40808

Wilde, Jenée

Aliens, monsters, killer androids, mutants…. Such metaphors may express cultural fears of the “other” that underlie social prejudice, intolerance, and discrimination. But viewers and fans may also read against the grain of normative cinematic images, finding identity and affirmation in the... (read more)

42386

This course explores the literature of Ken Kesey, viewed in the context of American literary precursors, two significant novels, and subsequent writings by and about the author. To “frame” our study in this most compressed—four week!—course, our understanding will be aided by Richard Poirier’s... (read more)

0

Tanner, Rachel

This course provides an introduction to the academic discipline of Comics Studies, which focuses on
comics as a form of literary production and asks questions about how and why comics are written and
read. You will be exposed to a variety of comic-art forms (the newspaper strip, the... (read more)

0

Course Description: This course will build on our abilities to watch, analyze and write about media objects, particularly film. We will learn to recognize, define and elaborate on various kinds of cinema (fiction, documentary, etc), genres (musical, western, crime, etc), and elements of... (read more)

0

Li, David

As indicated by the title, this class is an introduction to the literary production by American authors of Asian descent. We shall read classic texts from this ethnic American literary tradition to understand the unique histories that shape it and to appreciate the people’s struggles and... (read more)

0

Course Description:
This course is a survey of writings by African American authors of the 18th, 19th, 20th and 21st centuries. We will study a range of genres, including fiction, poetry, drama, autobiography, and nonfiction, from the earliest published work by African Americans through to... (read more)

0

Pyle, Forest; Filo, Gina

Description This course, which focuses on four of the later plays of Shakespeare’s career, is designed as an introduction to the language, themes, contexts, and implications of Shakespeare’s most mature work. Though our close reading of these plays will lead us to consider any number of the many... (read more)

0

Ever since The Blair Witch Project (1999) was marketed as “found footage” documenting the last few days of missing—and presumably dead—film students, the horror genre has been dominated by an endless barrage of films pretending to be discovered footage of actual events. These films have been so... (read more)

0

English 110 is a lower-division elective that satisfies the Arts & Letters group
requirement by critically examining film and media objects. This incarnation of the
course is titled, “Survey of US Cinema.” We will screen a sampling of films associated
with US/American cinema... (read more)

0

Shankman, Steven

English 109 is the third quarter of a year-long survey of World Literature. In the third quarter we read works from the modern period. What does it mean to be a modern? The word “modern” is commonly used to mean “new,” and most often it refers to our own era. It is a well-established practice... (read more)

0

Clark, Stephanie

Reading two novels, including John Crowley’s classic post-apocalyptic fantasy novel Engine Summer, and a variety of short stories, ENG 104 addresses basic questions about the nature of prose narrative and the interrelated activities of reading, writing, and interpretation. Most of the course... (read more)

32037

Upton, Corbett

Course Description: This course offers students a broad introduction to the study of literary fiction. Focusing on
the works of major writers, students develop analytical skills that will allow them to think, write, and speak
intelligently about fiction. The course addresses basic... (read more)

32056

Gopal, Sangita

Course Objectives: This is the final segment of a three-term sequence that studies how cinema evolved as an institution and and an industrial art form. English 267 covers the period 1950s to the present. The aim of the course is explore the recent history of global cinema and develop the... (read more)

32056

Gopal, Sangita

This is the final segment of a three-term sequence that studies how cinema evolved as an institution and and an industrial art form. English 267 covers the period 1950s to the present. The aim of the course is explore the recent history of global cinema and develop the critical and analytic... (read more)

32069

This course qualifies to satisfy Arts and Letters Group. It is designed to provide students with appropriate tools of understanding and evaluating critically debates, speeches, and other forms of oral discourse in the public sphere, and to provide students with a performative basis for engaging... (read more)

32071

This course will provide students with an understanding of how one of the
major Hollywood studios functioned during Hollywood’s “Classical” Era. We will study the
workings of the studio system and of Warner Bros. in particular, including its stars, directors,
producers, films, and... (read more)

36586

Wheeler, Elizabeth (Betsy)

This genre course revolves around key figures of fantasy literature such as mythical
beasts, bodily transformation, portals, talking animals, wizards, magical objects,
quests, and world-building. Each one of these figures is a motif: “a unit within literature
that proves so useful... (read more)

36587

Wood, Mary

This course will examine the development of autobiography as a literary genre from the spiritual narratives of medieval women mystics to the graphic memoirs of twenty-first century writers. Along the way we will consider a range of autobiographical forms, including slave narrative, immigrant... (read more)

36594

Miller, Quinn

This course introduces students to critical thinking about the historical and economic
factors influencing film, media, and cultural production in Hollywood and in response to
Hollywood. Unconventional textual and contextual dynamics, understood as queer
history, are the focus of... (read more)

36657

Tanner, Rachel

This course provides an introduction to the academic discipline of Comics Studies, which focuses on
comics as a form of literary production and asks questions about how and why comics are written and
read. You will be exposed to a variety of comic-art forms (the newspaper strip, the... (read more)

36667

Bohls, Elizabeth

We will study the literary production of early Black writers and the representation of slavery in the Anglophone literature of the Atlantic Rim, including historical contexts and influential critical approaches. Primary materials include travel narratives, slave narratives, planter histories,... (read more)

36674

Crosswhite, James

In this course, you will review and explore important concepts in rhetoric and
argumentation theory, and you will gain skill in discovering the questions that drive
controversies and the arguments that can be made on all the different sides of an
issue. You will also practice... (read more)

22202

Wheeler, Elizabeth (Betsy); Floyd, Courtney

Why do stories matter? In this class we will read novels of childhood and adolescence, both
fantasy and realistic, and compare them to the stories that matter in our own lives and
families. The novels come from India, England, South Korea, and the United States. By the
end of the... (read more)

22203

Upton, Corbett

This course offers students a broad introduction to the study of literary fiction. Focusing on
the works of major writers, students develop analytical skills that will allow them to think, write, and speak
intelligently about fiction. The course addresses basic questions about the... (read more)

22209

Wonham, Henry

ENG 106 is an introduction to one of the major genres in literary studies. Through careful analysis of poems by five major American writers—Emily Dickinson, Walt Whitman, Robert Frost, Elizabeth Bishop, and Wallace Stevens—students will be challenged to explain not only what a given poem might... (read more)

22212

English 110 is a lower-division elective that satisfies the Arts & Letters group requirement by critically examining film and media objects. This incarnation of the course is titled, “Survey of US Cinema.” We will screen a sampling of films associated with US/American cinema throughout its... (read more)

22213

This course aims to provide an introduction to television studies and the relationship between American television, as a crucial source of news and entertainment, and the postwar nation. While we will address key industrial and technological history related to the television medium, the course... (read more)

22218

Myers, Kate

The words of Falstaff, one of Shakespeare’s most beloved and most criticized characters, maintain two contradictory ideas: that the truth is the truth and that it is not. In lines like this one, Falstaff and many other Shakespearean characters model the ambivalence of perspective, orientation,... (read more)

22230

Curry, Elizabeth

This course will introduce students to changing depictions of the environment in 19th, 20th, and 21st century literature. Represented as resplendent landscape, increasingly industrialized space, ecologically compromised habitat, and as chemically altered agricultural swath, the environment and... (read more)

22233

Gopal, Sangita

This course will build on our abilities to watch, analyze and write about media objects, particularly film. We will learn to recognize, define and elaborate on various kinds of cinema (fiction, documentary etc), genres (musical, western, horror etc), elements of narrative (script, plot, point of... (read more)

22234

This is the second part of a three-term sequence that studies the history of cinema. We will use a series of case studies to develop your research, analytic, and writing skills in terms of critical thinking, historical analysis, key films, and specific movements in various historical and... (read more)

22240

Graman, Claire

Discussion sections for ENG 266 are designed to provide you with close interaction and the opportunity to actively participate with your peers. This section is your chance to ask and answer questions, to discuss the films, readings, and lectures, and to analyze closely the formal qualities of... (read more)

22247

Miller, Quinn

This course introduces students to critical thinking about the historical and economic factors influencing film, media, and cultural production in Hollywood and in response to Hollywood. Unconventional textual and contextual dynamics, understood as queer history, are the focus of the course. The... (read more)

26050

Kaufman, Heidi

What happens when digital tools meet literature? What can the “digital turn” in literary studies help us to understand about stories, history, language, aesthetics, form, cultural networks, adaptation, rhetoric, and the transmission of the written word?

(read more)
26936

Miller, Quinn

This course explores formal elements of analog and digital media culture. To develop foundational skills for critical analysis, we explore complexity in representation and the interplay of production, norms, and power relations in performance and composition. The course focuses on mediation as... (read more)

26958

Brown, Kirby

This course will explore literary and cultural engagements with questions of nationhood, sovereignty, story, and place across a variety of genres and forms, from oral traditions, dramas, and critical essays, to visual art, op-editorials, new media productions, and texts that defy generic... (read more)

26972

Wonham, Henry

Together with ENG 391, ENG 392 forms a chronological upper-division survey of the American novel from the 19th to the 20th century. These courses can be taken as a sequence, or they can be taken individually. No prerequisites are required, but students should be capable of advanced university-... (read more)

26987

Peppis, Paul

Genre courses focus on particular genres and forms crucial for the study of English, American, and Anglophone literature and culture and are aimed primarily at English majors. So structured, these courses explicitly align with the first three of the English Department’s core competencies in ... (read more)

26991

Sayre, Gordon

The goal of this course is to learn how to analyze the structure of English sentences, or syntax. The method is sentence diagramming, a technique for identifying and separating the elements of a sentence, the subject, object, verb, conjunctions and clauses, in a graphic arrangement. We will only... (read more)

26992

We will read a variety of Latina novels, short stories, and screenplays to explore how themes of migration, displacement, race, sexism, class, and homophobia appear within Chicana/Latina literary traditions.

(read more)
26994

O'Kelly, Brendan

ENG 300 introduces you to literary criticism and literary theory. We will examine major modes and schools of criticism—engaging in depth with the theories that inform them—to provide you with a strong background for comprehending contemporary literary studies as an academic discipline and... (read more)

27000

Laskaya, C. Anne

ENG 107 is the first of a three-part chronological survey examining international trends in literature from ancient civilizations to the present. The year-long sequence (107, 108, 109) may be taken as a sequence or individually. There are no prerequisites, and no background knowledge of global... (read more)

27004

Dawson, Brent

This course approaches Spenser’s epic poem, The Faerie Queene, as an influential example of the genre of romance. Romance—a type of literature filled with questing knights, monstrous beings, and enchanted landscapes—predates Spenser, but Spenser plays an important role in creating the modern... (read more)

27143

Brock, Justin

In this class, we will analyze games and interactive fiction (IF) as our shared textual objects. We
will examine the ways in which these texts interact with readers/users/players in the
(re)creation of narrative, worlds, selves, and identities.

(read more)
27144

The literature of the 19th century in England—especially of that period associated with the reign of Queen Victoria—is often neglected by modern readers who assume its values are prudish, its style is stuffy, and its ideas are hopelessly out of date. However, the Victorian period was a time of... (read more)

22210

Laskaya, C. Anne

This course will examine the General Prologue and a number of  Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, along with a few texts from which Chaucer borrowed and which exerted considerable influence on his work. We will also read a few important scholarly interpre- tations, exploring the arguments of scholars... (read more)

27017

Sayre, Gordon

English 461 is an introduction to the literature of colonial America and the Early Republic. It satisfies the 1500-1789 area requirement for the English major. The course does not emphasize familiar genres of novel, poetry, or short story. Instead, we will be reading missionary relations,... (read more)

27109

Whalan, Mark

This course provides a survey of American literature since 1900 with a focus on American literature in the world. We consider what happens when American writers (and characters) travel, how American writers use cultural and linguistic resources from around the world, as well as what America and... (read more)