English Major

22039

Theme: Disability in Modern Fiction

ENG 104 introduces you to prose narrative and its formal elements by reading, discussing, and writing about works of modern literature. To help us better recognize these formal elements, we will pay specific attention to the competing ways disability is... (read more)

22042

Burkert, Mattie

ENG 105 is an introduction to drama—literature written for performance or with the conventions of performance in mind. In this course you will read, discuss, and analyze a diverse selection of influential plays by English and American writers, in addition to works in translation. The texts we... (read more)

22043

People respond to movies in different ways, and there are many reasons for this. We have all stood in the lobby of a theater and heard conflicting opinions from people who have just seen the same film. Some loved it, some hated it, some found it just OK. Perhaps we've thought, "What do they know... (read more)

22044

Crosswhite, James

In this course, you will review and explore important concepts in rhetoric and argumentation theory, and you will gain skill in discovering the questions that drive controversies and the arguments that can be made on all the different sides of an issue. You will also practice speaking, writing,... (read more)

22045

Peppis, Paul

Genre courses focus on particular genres and forms crucial for the study of English, American, and Anglophone literature and culture and are aimed primarily at English majors. This course on tragedy traces the historical development and transformation of the genre and places strong emphasis on... (read more)

22046

Bovilsky, Lara

This course will survey the long history of stories about the creation of artificial people. We’ll look at the desires expressed by this genre, most of all, the desire to perfect or eliminate what is most human. Familiar questions – can robots feel? can we tell who is a robot? what traits are... (read more)

22048

Sayre, Gordon

The goal of this course is to learn how to analyze the structure, or syntax, of English sentences. Our method will be sentence diagramming, a technique for identifying and separating the elements of a sentence--such as the subject, object, verb, prepositions, phrases and clauses--in a graphic... (read more)

22050

Barter, Faith

This course is a survey of writings by African American authors from the 18th century through the Harlem Renaissance. Studying fiction, essays, and poetry, we’ll close read representative texts to identify formal and thematic elements that characterize the African American literary tradition. We... (read more)

22053

Burkert, Mattie

ENG 250 is the gateway to the English Department’s Digital Humanities Minor. The interdisciplinary field of digital humanities (DH) is concerned with the relationship between digital technology and the humanities (academic disciplines that study language, literature, history, philosophy,... (read more)

22054

This course explores the fundamentals of film and media aesthetics, including narrative, mise-en-scène, cinematography, editing, and sound. By learning how to analyze film and utilize proper cinematic language, students will begin to critically understand film as an art form and a product of... (read more)

22055

This course explores the fundamentals of film and media aesthetics, including narrative, mise-en-scène, cinematography, editing, and sound. By learning how to analyze film and utilize proper cinematic language, students will begin to critically understand film as an art form and a product of... (read more)

22056

Kelp-Stebbins, Kate

This course provides an introduction to the analysis of comics and graphic narratives in terms of their poetics, genres, forms, history, and the academic discipline of Comics Studies. Our multifaceted examination will balance close reading with in-depth research and analysis of the development... (read more)

22058

Laskaya, C. Anne; Pyle, Forest

ENG 304, Contexts for Literary/Textual Study, is part of The Foundations of the English Major three-course series (ENG 303, ENG 304, ENG 305). The series introduces students to the discipline of English as it is practiced at the University of Oregon, providing English majors with a common... (read more)

22063

Thorsson, Courtney

In this course, we will study novels by Black American women from the late nineteenth century to the present. Using close reading and historical context, we will consider how these novels construct race, class, and gender; the possibilities and limits of the novel form; whether and how these... (read more)

22065

Cortez, José

Bullshit, Fake News, and Argumentation

The practice of bullshitting (“speech intended to persuade without regard for truth”) is firmly sedimented into civic life in the 21st century. Examples are everywhere: fake social media accounts and highjacked elections, accusations of... (read more)

22068

The Black Fantastic 

In 2020, against the backdrop of a pandemic, wildfires, anti-Black violence, a global wave of protests and social unrest, and political upheaval, Octavia Butler’s 1993 Afrofuturist novel, Parable of the Sower, reached the New York Times bestseller... (read more)

22069

McGuffie, Allison

This course studies works of film and media as aesthetic objects that engage with communities identified by class, gender, race, ethnicity, and sexuality. It considers both the effects of prejudice, intolerance and discrimination on media and filmmaking practices and modes of reception that... (read more)

22073

Myers, Kate

ENG 399 Writing Associates Development is a variable-credit, hybrid, companion course designed to support tutors in ENG 404 Internship for Writing Associates. The course focuses on the professional development of the Writing Associates and their continuing study of the practice and... (read more)

22075

Kelp-Stebbins, Kate

In the last two decades, comics journalism has become one of the most provocative forms of creative nonfiction and an essential field of comics art. University of Oregon alum Joe Sacco, who received his BA in journalism in 1981, effectively founded contemporary comics journalism through his... (read more)

22076

Dawson, Brent

Students in “Shakespeare’s World” learn to read Shakespeare’s works in relation to the cultural, literary, and historical contexts in which he wrote. This can be a first course in Shakespeare (no prerequisites). In Winter 2021, students will read Hamlet in relation to earlier revenge... (read more)

22077

Myers, Kate

ENG 399 Writing Associates Development is a variable-credit, hybrid, companion course designed to support tutors in ENG 404 Internship for Writing Associates. The course focuses on the professional development of the Writing Associates and their continuing study of the practice and... (read more)

22085

In this course, we will study poetry of the Black Arts Movement (BAM) in its literary, political, and cultural contexts. BAM is the cultural arm of the Black Power Movement and was at its peak from about 1965 to about 1976. BAM writers are diverse in terms of form, genre, gender, geography, and... (read more)

22088

Clark, Stephanie

OEII: The Adventure Continues! In OEII we’ll read a varied selection of shorter poems and prose in Old English and perform a (virtual) reenactment of The Battle of Maldon. You’ll get some of the finer points of OE grammar and we’ll review other grammatical concepts as needed. The course... (read more)

22336

Wojcik, Daniel

Explores the role of folklore in people's religious lives with particular emphasis on narrative, beliefs, rituals, celebrations, otherworldly encounters, pilgrimage, and ecstatic states.

(read more)
25502

Emphasis on form, function, and style of scientific, professional and technical writing: weekly writing assignments include proposals, reports, definitions, instructions, summaries. Use of documentation in publication. Junior standing required. Prerequisite: completion of UO writing requirement... (read more)

25503

Emphasis on form, function, and style of scientific, professional and technical writing: weekly writing assignments include proposals, reports, definitions, instructions, summaries. Use of documentation in publication. Junior standing required. Prerequisite: completion of UO writing requirement... (read more)

25504

Practice in writing and analyzing internal and external messages common to business, industry, and professions. Suggested for business and management students.

WR 321 offers practice in writing and analyzing communication common to business, industry, and related professions. Students will... (read more)

25505

Practice in writing and analyzing internal and external messages common to business, industry, and professions. Suggested for business and management students.

WR 321 offers practice in writing and analyzing communication common to business, industry, and related professions. Students will... (read more)

26359

This course is an introductory survey where we will identify and define the field of Chicanx and Latinx literatures and cultural studies through a critical engagement. In addition to considering how history, politics, and literary periods shape these robust fields, we will also examine the ways... (read more)

26360

What is the Age of King Arthur? Legends of King Arthur, Excalibur, Merlin, the Holy Grail, and Camelot have persisted from their medieval origins into our contemporary culture. In this introductory English course, we will read Arthurian literature in translation from French, German, Welsh, Latin... (read more)

26361

Southworth, Helen

In this class we’ll consider life-writing as a form, focusing on auto/biography and memoir.  We’ll read a selection of life stories by modernist writers, including Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, James Baldwin, Gertrude Stein, Virginia Woolf and Jean Rhys, and explore how they present... (read more)

26397

Saunders, Ben

Poetry is often regarded as the most demanding of all literary genres — the loftiest and most profound, the hardest to write, the most difficult to study.  Thanks to this challenging reputation, even English Majors are unlikely to read poetry for their own entertainment.  In fact, many people... (read more)

26403

Trapp, Brian

ENG 240 introduces students to central concepts and essential texts in disability studies and applies them to literary and cultural texts, with a focus on racial diversity and learning directly from writers and scholars who experience a wide spectrum of body/mind variabilities. The texts in this... (read more)

26406

Barter, Faith

This course considers how women writers acknowledge, resist, and re-imagine their relationship to law. We will read literary works that directly engage law, as well as scholarship from legal studies to explore questions including: What is the relationship between law and literature? How do women... (read more)

26408

Frank, David

In this course we will examine theories of reasoned-based argumentation in the oral mode, and then incorporate those theories into the practice of making effective speeches that advocate for particular positions on arguable issues of public concern. We will analyze and critique oral arguments as... (read more)

26411

Brown, Kirby

La Malinche. Pocahontas. Sacagawea. These are likely the only Indigenous women with whom many are familiar. Though real historical figures, these Indigenous women are often depicted in popular literature along a rigid spectrum as race traitors or colonial sympathizers, virtuous princesses or... (read more)

26412

Southworth, Helen

In this course we’ll explore graphic narratives as a mode of life writing (biography. autobiography, memoir, coming of age narratives). We’ll discuss the ways in which the graphic narrative lends itself particularly well to these kinds of stories. Themes will include: the process of life-writing... (read more)

26413

Bergquist, Carolyn

We are going to look very closely at sentences to see how they work, how the individual parts of speech draw together into syntax, and what effect (artistic and otherwise) these patterns of syntax create. The course will mix technical study of sentence structure and reflection upon their artful... (read more)

26415

Clark, Stephanie

This course explores texts produced by the three major cultures inhabiting the British Isles in the early Middle Ages: the Táin bo Culainge and stories of St. Brigit for the Irish; the Saga of the Volsungs and the Prose Edda (written in Iceland) for the Danes; and Genesis... (read more)

26417

Pyle, Forest

British Romantic Writers

This course will be a sustained examination of the question: “What is Romanticism? This is a question which has no single or ultimate answer given that there seem to be as many answers as there are “askers.” There is, however, a rich and complex body of literature... (read more)

26419

Saunders, Ben

Once upon a time, the four-color world of the superhero was a comfortingly simple place.  Whether they came from distant galaxies or our home planet, the super-powered beings of the 1940s and 50s were secure in their sense of righteousness and generally saw no contradiction between truth,... (read more)

26422

Miller, Quinn

This class introduces students to TV as a way of studying the power dynamics of popular culture—with special attention to the 1950s and 1960s, unconventional forms of art, the overlaps of the music and television industries, and previous student research in this and other queer transgender media... (read more)

26424

Crosswhite, James

How are we persuaded? What is rhetoric? What is rhetorical criticism? What can rhetorical criticism do? How can it help us? In this course, we will explore the potential of rhetorical criticism. You will gain knowledge of rhetorical theory and rhetorical criticism, and you will gain experience... (read more)

26428

Dawson, Brent

St. Augustine once wrote, “I have become a question to myself.” What does it mean to turn my self into a question? And how could I possibly capture this self in words? Students in this section of 108 World Literature will look at three Renaissance authors—Shakespeare, Montaigne, and Petrarch—who... (read more)

26845

Wojcik, Daniel

An introduction to contemporary folklore studies, with emphasis on the meanings of stories, rituals, festivals, body art, subcultures, the supernatural, street art, Internet folklore, and other forms of vernacular expression as these relate to a diversity of social identities and cultural... (read more)

12462

Sayre, Gordon

Captivity Narrative was the earliest popular genre in American literature, in the seventeenth century. Its roots go back to the Old Testament stories of Moses, Daniel and Jonah, and these archetypes have influenced centuries of confrontations between people of different faiths and cultures, and... (read more)

17920

Sayre, Gordon

Captivity Narrative was the earliest popular genre in American literature, in the seventeenth century. Its roots go back to the Old Testament stories of Moses, Daniel and Jonah, and these archetypes have influenced centuries of confrontations between people of different faiths and cultures, and... (read more)

41830

Bryant-Berg, Kristy

This course offers a broad introduction to literature via examination of the American short story. We will begin in the 19th century with several of Poe’s short stories and examine samples of his work to appreciate his innovations in genre and form, and then trace these developments to his 20th ... (read more)

41831

Rust, Stephen

People respond to movies in different ways, and there are many reasons for this. We have all stood in the lobby of a theater and heard conflicting opinions from people who have just seen the same film.  Some loved it, some hated it, some found it just OK. Disagreements, however, can reveal a... (read more)

41832

Rust, Stephen

People respond to movies in different ways, and there are many reasons for this. We have all stood in the lobby of a theater and heard conflicting opinions from people who have just seen the same film.  Some loved it, some hated it, some found it just OK. Disagreements, however, can reveal a... (read more)

41837

Clevinger, Kara

“This is who we are, Mama. Real women.” This declaration made by America Ferrera’s character Ana in the 2002 coming-of-age film Real Women Have Curves marks a powerful turning point for Ana as she stands up for all women who have been made to feel ashamed for their bodies, their choices, their... (read more)

41839

McGuffie, Allison

This course studies works of film and media as representational objects that engage with communities identified by intersectional categories including sex, gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, nation, class, and ability. It considers historical and contemporary effects of prejudice, intolerance,... (read more)

41840

Clevinger, Kara

Escape! Whether we’re reading for pleasure or entertainment, the novel has been a means of escape for readers: an escape from reality, from the anxieties or doldrums of everyday life and into other lives and worlds. For nineteenth-century American readers who craved a fictional escape,... (read more)

41842

Upton, Corbett

After the end of the world

after death

I found myself in the midst of life

creating myself

building life

--“In the Midst of Life,” Tadeusz Rózewicz

After the cataclysm of WWII, the old order was beginning to crumble. In this aftermath, many artists viewed the... (read more)

43549

McGuffie, Allison

This course studies works of film and media as representational objects that engage with communities identified by intersectional categories including sex, gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, nation, class, and ability. It considers historical and contemporary effects of prejudice, intolerance,... (read more)

43552

Huang, Helen

This course investigates how contemporary female writers of color represent diaspora, immigration, and inequality in transnational contexts. Through reading Michelle Cliff, “White Chocolate,” and Jhumpa Lahiri’s “A Real Durwan,” we will explore how contemporary short stories reconsider ethical... (read more)

43660

Gopal, Sangita

This course provides an introduction to the analysis of form and style in cinema and related media, focusing on narrative, mise-en-scène, cinematography, editing, and sound. This course aims to develop your media literacy by providing you with a precise set of critical tools for analyzing moving... (read more)

32130

Thorsson, Courtney

In this class, we will read short stories by African American women writers. These texts will be our common ground as we learn to think deeply and... (read more)

32134

Smith, Parker

The intention of this course is to provide students with the skills necessary to understand and appreciate poetry as a unique form of linguistic... (read more)

32136

Bohls, Elizabeth

Since antiquity, for a variety of reasons, people have left home and hit the road. Journeys have always been a part of life, and travel writing has... (read more)

32138

Myers, Kate

Madness, truth, honor, pity—these are a few of the concepts Shakespeare explores in his earliest plays. In this online course, we will scrutinize... (read more)

32139

Clark, Stephanie

Grammar is the language we use to talk about language. It’s a tool for describing how written sentences work and figuring out and explaining why... (read more)

32142

Thorsson, Courtney

This course is a survey of writings by African American authors. We will study fiction, essays, and poetry in their historical, political, and... (read more)

32144

Brown, Kirby

In 1968, Kiowa writer N. Scott Momaday's House Made of Dawn was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for American literature. Momaday's award signaled... (read more)

32145

In this course, we will explore the basic elements of media aesthetics through the very contemporary issue of global pandemics. For our purposes, we will take the word “pandemic” loosely, following its association with pandemonium, as “a place or state of utter confusion and uproar.”  Deriving... (read more)

32380

Sayre, Gordon

In this course we study car collecting and customizing as vernacular art traditions, and survey of some of the astonishing range of human behaviors... (read more)

36154

Wojcik, Daniel

Introduces the study of beliefs about the supernatural by examining diverse approaches to the description and analysis of belief traditions and religious cultures. Topics... (read more)

36155

Bayless, Martha

This course brings together readings of the Bible in the Judeo-Christian tradition with apt mythological, folkloristic, and traditional contexts,... (read more)

36258

Wojcik, Daniel

An introduction to contemporary folklore studies, with emphasis on the meanings of stories, rituals, festivals, body art, subcultures, street art,... (read more)

36471

Crosswhite, James

In this course, you will explore important concepts in rhetoric and argumentation theory, and you will gain skill in discovering the questions that... (read more)

36474

Dawson, Brent

Early in his career, Shakespeare was fascinated by intoxication: the kind brought on by drugs and potions, yes, but also the thrills of poetic... (read more)

36476

Galentine, Cassandra

Latinxs have lived, worked, and thrived in what is now considered the United States for a long time. This course is an introductory survey of U.S. Latinx literature that will give students a glimpse of the wide range of formal, thematic, and cultural diversity of... (read more)

36483

Bovilsky, Lara; Peppis, Paul; Saunders, Ben

The Foundations of the English Major is a three-course series (ENG 303, ENG 304, ENG 305) introducing students to the discipline of English as practiced at the University of Oregon. The series provides English majors with a common intellectual experience and a foundation for future coursework in... (read more)

36486

Reynolds, Megan

This discussion section is a space to put the methodologies you learn in the lecture sessions into practice. We will use these weekly meetings to review and cement the concepts introduced in lecture, answer lingering concerns, and prepare for upcoming assignments. You might consider this... (read more)

36487

Reynolds, Megan

This discussion section is a space to put the methodologies you learn in the lecture sessions into practice. We will use these weekly meetings to review and cement the concepts introduced in lecture, answer lingering concerns, and prepare for upcoming assignments. You might consider this... (read more)

36489

Quigley, Mark

Narrating the Sunset of the British Empire: The Twentieth-Century Novel from Modernism to Postmodernism

... (read more)
36913

Carroll, Anna

On the back of Broken Harbor (in the Dublin Murder Squad series by Tana French, of which we’re reading the first installment), a reviewer’s comment reads: “It’s literature masquerading as police procedural.” While the overlapping genres of detective fiction, mystery, and psychological... (read more)

22216

Kovalchuk, Anna

This course considers, as its point of departure, bell hooks’ evocative quote that “to be in the margin is to be part of the whole but outside the main body.” This term,we’ll consider the peoples, places,and ideas that often exist in the margins of American literature. In this... (read more)

22217

Hatay-Ferens, Molly

This term, we will examine texts that feature hauntings, broadly defined, to consider the echoes of history, memory, and culture in literature. We will work to consider how these... (read more)

22218

Wheeler, Elizabeth (Betsy)

Why do stories matter? In this class we will read novels of childhood and adolescence, both fantasy and realistic, and compare them to... (read more)

22221

Garcia, Rogelio

This course is an introduction to film and media studies and various methods of critical analysis. In this course, we will see that... (read more)

22222

Frank, David

This course is designed to provide students with the equipment they need to understand the theory and practice of public speaking as a... (read more)

22223

Brown, Kirby

Though signifying idealized notions of love in popular parlance, romance is about more than the transcendent power and emotional magic... (read more)

22228

Alaimo, Stacy

Do we read literature differently when we read for the environment? How are environmental issues connected to colonialism, gender,... (read more)

22230

Rust, Stephen

This course explores the fundamentals of film and media aesthetics, including narrative, mise-en-scène, cinematography, editing, and... (read more)

22231

Ok, HyeRyoung

This course explores the fundamentals of film and media aesthetics, including narrative, mise-en-scène, cinematography, editing, and... (read more)

22241

This course introduces students to critical thinking about the aesthetic, historical and economic factors influencing film, media, and... (read more)

22243

Myers, Kate

ENG 399 Writing Associates Development is a variable-credit, hybrid, companion course designed to support tutors in ENG 404 ... (read more)

25959

O'Kelly, Brendan

Emphasis on form, function, and style of scientific, professional, and technical writing; weekly writing assignments include proposals, reports, definitions, instructions, summaries. Use of documentation in publication.

(read more)
25960

Carroll, Anna

Emphasis on form, function, and style of scientific, professional, and technical writing; weekly writing assignments include proposals, reports, definitions, instructions, summaries. Use of documentation in publication.

(read more)
25961

Smars, Bjorn

Practice in writing and analyzing internal and external messages common to business, industry, and professions. Suggested for business... (read more)

26303

Wojcik, Daniel

An introduction to contemporary folklore studies, with emphasis on the meanings of stories, rituals, festivals, body art, subcultures,... (read more)

26306

Wojcik, Daniel

Examines the research questions and theoretical models used by folklorists and other scholars in the study of vernacular religion and... (read more)

26542

Wonham, Henry

This course is an introduction to one of the major genres in literary studies. Students will read, discuss, analyze, and attend plays... (read more)

26543

Clark, Stephanie

Fantasy and Violence will examine the role of violence in literature of the fantastic with special attention to the problems violence... (read more)

26544

Dawson, Brent

This course is an introduction to the genre of comedy. It surveys examples of comedy across a long historical range—from classical... (read more)

26546

Fickle, Tara

This course introduces students to some of the major works, authors, and themes of Asian American literature, a diverse body of writing... (read more)

26547

Cavanaugh, Alex

The prolific White Earth Ojibwe writer Gerald Vizenor conceptualizes the cultural work of Indigenous literatures as “survivance,”... (read more)

26548

Kelp-Stebbins, Kate

This course provides an introduction to the analysis of comics and graphic narratives in terms of their poetics, genres, forms, history... (read more)

26549

Pyle, Forest

This course is designed to introduce students to some important theories and practices of literary and cultural criticism. My goals for... (read more)

26556

Whalan, Mark

This course presents a survey of American novels in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. It will cover a variety of styles and... (read more)

26557

Quigley, Mark

“Things Fall Apart”: Revolution, Reaction and Renewal in Early Twentieth Century Culture (1895-1945)... (read more)

26558

Bovilsky, Lara

Students in “Shakespeare’s World” learn to read Shakespeare’s works in relation to the cultural, literary, and historical contexts in... (read more)

26563

Laskaya, C. Anne

ENG 427 invites students to engage selections from Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales. Texts will include the more familiar comedic... (read more)

26564

Clark, Stephanie

OEII reviews and builds on the grammatical foundations learned in OEI and adds to students’ knowledge of early English literature and... (read more)

26578

Crosswhite, James

Rhetoric has been characterized as a power to lead the soul, the universal form of communication, the art of persuasion, the way we... (read more)

26664

Kaufman, Heidi

What happens when digital tools and literature meet? What can the “digital turn” in literary studies help us to understand about... (read more)

26666

Brundan, Katherine

This course focuses on fictional constructions of nation in British novels of the nineteenth century. In an era embracing massive... (read more)

26942

Hernández, Teresa

This discussion section is a space to practice the methodologies you will be learning throughout the ENG 304 lecture sessions. We will use our weekly meetings to review and cement the concepts introduced... (read more)

26943

Roethle, Christopher

This discussion section supplements your lectures with opportunities for direct participation in the form of... (read more)

26945

Roethle, Christopher

This discussion section supplements your lectures with opportunities for direct participation in the form of questions, comments, and conversation with classmates. Our discussions will be most... (read more)

26971

Gershow, Miriam

Practice in writing and analyzing internal and external messages common to business, industry, and professions. Suggested for business... (read more)

26988

Upton, Corbett

What makes a poem modern or a poet a modernist? The history of modern poetry, like that of any literary period, is a ... (read more)

12097

Huang, Helen

This course investigates how three contemporary female writers, Michelle Cliff, Jhumpa Lahiri, and Helena María Vitamontes, represent contemporary issues alienation, racism, immigration, (in)hospitality, environmental justice in diasporic contexts. Through reading Cliff, “The Dissolution of Mrs... (read more)

12098

Tiwari, Avinnash

Through this course, students develop analytical skills that will allow them to think, write, and speak intelligently about fiction.... (read more)

12099

Wheeler, Elizabeth (Betsy)

Why do stories matter? In this class we will read novels of childhood and adolescence, both fantasy and realistic, and compare them to... (read more)

12102

Alilunas, Peter

This course is an introduction to film and media studies and various methods of critical analysis. In this course, we will see that... (read more)

12105

Laskaya, C. Anne

Listening rigorously and deeply, inquiring into issues and topics of importance to our communities, and speaking effectively are key elements that assist our... (read more)

12106

Cortez, José

This course will introduce students to the genre of testimonial literary discourse, or testimonio: an authentic narrative, told... (read more)

12111

Barter, Faith

This course is a survey of literature by African American authors from the 19th century into the present. We will read texts from a range of genres... (read more)

12112

Preston, Sarah

As an introductory survey, this course emphasizes the formal, thematic, and cultural diversity of Latinx literature. We will read novels, poetry, short stories... (read more)

12113

Brown, Kirby

In 1968, Kiowa writer N. Scott Momaday's House Made of Dawn was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for American literature. The award signaled for many the “... (read more)

12114

Fickle, Tara

This course introduces students to the Digital Humanities (DH) — broadly defined as the use of digital tools, platforms, and critical perspectives to address... (read more)

12117

O'Kelly, Brendan

This course provides an introduction to the analysis of comics and graphic narratives in terms of their poetics, genres, forms, history, and the academic... (read more)

16018

Myers, Kate

Provides students concurrently enrolled in WR 121 with one-on-one tutoring. Enrollment priority based on entrance exam (SAT or ACT) scores. Repeatable once.

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16019

Supervised writing projects in nonfiction prose. Repeatable up to five times.

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16020

Myers, Kate

The practice and ethics of tutoring writing in the context of writing in various academic disciplines. Theories of teaching, tutoring techniques, and assessment of writing.

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16423

Miller, Quinn

This course examines the pithy praise appearing on book jackets and other product packaging. Blurbs are quick descriptions. They... (read more)

16424

Wald, Sarah D

This class explores depictions of the environment in literature with a particular emphasis on contemporary U.S. fiction and non-fiction. By attending to the... (read more)

16933

Conable, William

This course is an introduction to drama, one of the major genres in literary studies. Students will read, discuss, and analyze plays... (read more)

16934

Craven, Robert

This course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of the formal properties of poetry in English. Through careful analysis of poems by... (read more)

16980

Sanyal, Debarghya

This course provides an introduction to the analysis of comics and graphic narratives in terms of their poetics, genres, forms, history... (read more)