E-Media/Folklore/Culture

Media, Folklore, and/or Culture courses focus on print and non-print media to explore culture and its processes of creative expression.

12035

McGuffie, Allison

This course studies works of film and media as aesthetic objects that engage with communities identified by class, gender, race, ethnicity, and sexuality. It considers both the effects of prejudice, intolerance and discrimination on media and filmmaking practices and modes of reception that... (read more)

12078

Johnson, Mat

“In this seminar, we will examine the form of sequential art we call comic books. The course is composed of two parts: close reading of landmark graphic novels and comics, and secondly the writing of original comic scripts. Throughout the term, we will examine a wide variety of groundbreaking... (read more)

12084

Miller, Quinn

This course explores research into gender and sexuality within Television and Media Studies, examining the history of this academic area in relation to multiple threads of queer and trans feminist criticism of film and media culture, including through independent student research into the LGBT+... (read more)

42214

McGuffie, Allison

This course studies works of film and media as aesthetic objects that engage with communities identified by class, gender, race, ethnicity, and sexuality. It considers both the effects of prejudice, intolerance and discrimination on media and filmmaking practices and modes of reception that... (read more)

42215

Rust, Stephen

ENG 381M: This asynchronous WEB course studies works of film and media produced around the globe as aesthetic objects that engage with communities identified by class, gender, race, ethnicity, and sexuality. It considers both the effects of prejudice, intolerance and discrimination on media and... (read more)

30930

Sayre, Gordon

In recent decades environmental scientists have used ice cores, tree rings, and trace elements to establish fine-grained histories of climate and ecology stretching back several hundred thousand years. Also, scholars in geo-mythology have compared folk legends to geologic events and paleoecology... (read more)

31457

Bayless, Martha

In this course we’ll explore the old and new examples of the oldest form of literature —literature composed, told, and transmitted orally.  We’ll look at examples ranging from the Odyssey, Beowulf, and the medieval Irish epic, The Táin, to fairy tales, jokes, urban legends, and... (read more)

31458

Bayless, Martha

In this course we will explore some of the many myths and legends of the medieval Celts (in this case, the Welsh and the Irish), from King Arthur to CuChulainn and beyond.  We will look at the history of the Celts, at early Celtic culture, at what is known of Celtic gods and the Druids, and at... (read more)

33631

Kelp-Stebbins, Kate

What does it mean for a woman to write her self in comics? Our class will explore the form of graphic memoir through works such as Marjane Satrapi’s Persepolis, Alison Bechdel’s Fun Home, and Bishakh Som’s Spellbound, in order to think through the risks and tactics of... (read more)

33639

Southworth, Helen

This course offers an introduction to the graphic narrative form with a focus on life-writing and coming of age narratives.  Themes will include: the process of life-writing; time; representing bodies/disability; “comic’s long history of ‘powerful marginality’” (El Refaie, 7); reader response;... (read more)

33640

Wheeler, Elizabeth (Betsy)

This course examines human bodies in comics, focusing on intersections of disability with gender, race, and sexuality. We consider the intertwined relationship between bodies and minds that disability studies scholars call the bodymind. Change is a fundamental property of bodyminds. Sometimes we... (read more)

33653

Kelp-Stebbins, Kate

In the last two decades, comics journalism has become one of the most provocative forms of creative nonfiction and an essential field of comics art. University of Oregon alum Joe Sacco, who received his BA in journalism in 1981, effectively founded contemporary comics journalism through his... (read more)

33658

Burkert, Mattie

This project-based capstone experience is an opportunity for students to bring together all the skills and knowledge they have developed while completing the Digital Humanities minor. The initial weeks of the course will provide a firm foundation in organizing research materials using... (read more)

20518

Sayre, Gordon

In this course we study car collecting and customizing as vernacular art traditions, and survey the astonishing range of human behaviors around cars and trucks. To better understand cars we also will learn of the history of the automotive industry, environmental issues arising from cars, and U.S... (read more)

22463

Miller, Quinn

This class explores liner notes written for vinyl records and other media formats. With a focus on the 1950s-1970s and labels like Rosetta Records, we study essays printed on LP packaging – on the cardboard sleeves that contain, transport, and protect the recorded sound of an album – doing so in... (read more)

22467

Kelp-Stebbins, Kate

Comics and graphic narratives are uniquely suited to exploring cultural location because they transform the storytelling unit of the page into a space of representation. The comics page graphically negotiates dynamics of home and away, self and other, as well as race and culture. In this course... (read more)

23674

McGuffie, Allison

This course studies works of film and media as aesthetic objects that engage with communities identified by class, gender, race, ethnicity, and sexuality. It considers both the effects of prejudice, intolerance and discrimination on media and filmmaking practices and modes of reception that... (read more)

16642

Bayless, Martha

This course will examine the Judeo-Christian Bible as a cultural document that continues to exert a strong and often unexamined influence on all aspects of our behavior, beliefs, literature, and art. We will read key sections of the Bible—both from the Hebrew and the Christian portions—examining... (read more)

17039

Johnson, Mat

In this seminar, we will examine the form of sequential art we call comic books. The course is composed of two parts: close reading of landmark graphic novels and comics, and writing of original comic scripts. Throughout the term, we will examine a wide variety of groundbreaking graphic novels,... (read more)

17177

This course studies works of film and media as aesthetic objects that engage with communities identified by class, gender, race, ethnicity, and sexuality. It considers both the effects of prejudice, intolerance and discrimination on media and filmmaking practices and modes of reception that... (read more)

32047

Miller, Quinn

This class explores the histories of women writers creating culture around vinyl records. With a focus on the 1950s-1970s and labels like Rosetta Records, we study essays printed on LP packaging – on the cardboard sleeves that contain, transport, and protect the recorded sound of an album –... (read more)

32054

Miller, Quinn

This course introduces students to critical thinking about the historical and economic factors influencing film, media, and cultural production in Hollywood and in response to Hollywood. Unconventional textual and contextual dynamics, understood as queer history, are the focus of the course,... (read more)

32055

Kelp-Stebbins, Kate

Comics and graphic narratives are uniquely suited to exploring cultural location because they transform the storytelling unit of the page into a space of representation. The comics page graphically negotiates dynamics of home and away, self and other, as well as race and culture. In this course... (read more)

32075

Burkert, Mattie

This course is the capstone for the Digital Humanities minor. In it, students will develop an original, term-length digital research project of their own design, bringing together all the skills and knowledge they have developed as they have taken other classes toward the minor. The project... (read more)

35818

Brown, Kirby

There is perhaps no image more widely recognized yet more grossly misunderstood in American popular culture than the “Indian.” Whether viewed as irredeemable savages and impediments to progress or as idealized possessors of primitive innocence and new-age spiritualism, “the Indian” stands as an... (read more)

36120

Gopal, Sangita

This course will examine feminist film criticism from multiple theoretical perspectives and diverse geo-political contexts. We will study how feminists have not only critiqued media and its representations of gender but also how the institution of cinema and media itself is gendered in terms of... (read more)

36459

Peppis, Paul

This course participates in the ongoing reassessment of relations between aesthetic modernism and popular culture. The rise of "New Modernist studies" over the past twenty five years, with its expansive historical orientation and interest in modernism's original cultural contexts, has led to a... (read more)

36968

Johnson, Mat

In this seminar, we will examine the form of sequential art we call comic books. The course is composed of two parts: close reading of landmark graphic novels and comics, and writing of original comic scripts. Throughout the term, we will examine a wide variety of groundbreaking graphic novels,... (read more)

22069

McGuffie, Allison

This course studies works of film and media as aesthetic objects that engage with communities identified by class, gender, race, ethnicity, and sexuality. It considers both the effects of prejudice, intolerance and discrimination on media and filmmaking practices and modes of reception that... (read more)

22075

Kelp-Stebbins, Kate

In the last two decades, comics journalism has become one of the most provocative forms of creative nonfiction and an essential field of comics art. University of Oregon alum Joe Sacco, who received his BA in journalism in 1981, effectively founded contemporary comics journalism through his... (read more)

22336

Wojcik, Daniel

Explores the role of folklore in people's religious lives with particular emphasis on narrative, beliefs, rituals, celebrations, otherworldly encounters, pilgrimage, and ecstatic states.

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26412

Southworth, Helen

In this course we’ll explore graphic narratives as a mode of life writing (biography. autobiography, memoir, coming of age narratives). We’ll discuss the ways in which the graphic narrative lends itself particularly well to these kinds of stories. Themes will include: the process of life-writing... (read more)

26419

Saunders, Ben

Once upon a time, the four-color world of the superhero was a comfortingly simple place.  Whether they came from distant galaxies or our home planet, the super-powered beings of the 1940s and 50s were secure in their sense of righteousness and generally saw no contradiction between truth,... (read more)

26422

Miller, Quinn

This class introduces students to TV as a way of studying the power dynamics of popular culture—with special attention to the 1950s and 1960s, unconventional forms of art, the overlaps of the music and television industries, and previous student research in this and other queer transgender media... (read more)

18223

McGuffie, Allison

This course studies works of film and media as representational objects that engage with communities identified ... (read more)

41839

McGuffie, Allison

This course studies works of film and media as representational objects that engage with communities identified by intersectional categories including sex, gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, nation, class, and ability. It considers historical and contemporary effects of prejudice, intolerance,... (read more)

43549

McGuffie, Allison

This course studies works of film and media as representational objects that engage with communities identified by intersectional categories including sex, gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, nation, class, and ability. It considers historical and contemporary effects of prejudice, intolerance,... (read more)

32156

This course introduces students to critical thinking about the aesthetic, historical and economic factors influencing film, media, and cultural... (read more)

32157

Kelp-Stebbins, Kate

Comics and graphic narratives are uniquely suited to exploring cultural location because they transform the storytelling unit of the page into a... (read more)

32170

Alaimo, Stacy

This course brings together critical animal studies and environmental studies.

  • The first unit asks what would it be like to be a bat or an octopus or some other species. Imagining the perspectives of other species leads... (read more)
32171

Johnson, Mat

In this seminar, we will examine the form of sequential art we call comic books. The course is composed of two parts: close reading of landmark... (read more)

32380

Sayre, Gordon

In this course we study car collecting and customizing as vernacular art traditions, and survey of some of the astonishing range of human behaviors... (read more)

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