C-Literature 1789-Present

Literature, 1789 to the present courses focus on literary work produced over more than two centuries -- from the period of British romanticism and the early republic of the United States up to now -- in order to foster familiarity with key works in British and American literary history.  Literary history illustrates how literary works reflect, address, and resist the social and political environments in which they are produced as well as other works that have preceded them.

12066

Casimir, Ulrick

This course is an introduction to the modern Anglophone Caribbean novel.  Primary reading consists of novels and a few short stories, with publication dates ranging from the 1890s to the late 20th/early 21st century.  Although the places of origin for the selected works represent only a small... (read more)

12067

LeMenager, Stephanie

This course begins with the question of what is the American novel? It is a question asked and answered by some of the most ingenious and challenging thinkers of the 20th and 21st centuries, who, as it turns out, are novelists. For these thinkers who think in the form of novels, the 20th century... (read more)

15670

Brown, Kirby

ENG 361: Native American Writers--Contemporary Indigenous Women Writers

Malintzin Tenepat. Pocahontas. Sacagawea. These are likely a few of only a handful of Indigenous women with whom many of us are familiar. Though real historical and contemporary figures, they are often depicted in... (read more)

15672

Southworth, Helen

This course focuses on the novel in twentieth-century Britain, from Conrad to the present.

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15673

Instructor:  Cheng, Mai-Lin

Secrets and scandals, mysteries and mayhem, potions and poisons--the world of Victorian literature and culture seethes with strange characters, thrilling plots, and dramatic stories. Our course will explore some of the period’s most fantastical, critical, and... (read more)

41838

Clevinger, Kara

Do you enjoy reading novels? Are you interested in writing a novel? Do you like history? This summer transport yourself with a novel to the strange and terrifying world of nineteenth-century America. There you’ll find characters fighting gothic terrors, enslavement, social injustice, and the... (read more)

41839

Upton, Corbett

After the end of the world

after death

I found myself in the midst of life

creating myself

building life

--“In the Midst of Life,” Tadeusz Rózewicz

After the cataclysm of WWII, the old order was beginning to crumble. In this aftermath, many artists viewed the... (read more)

33630

Southworth, Helen

This course covers a selection of works by women writing (mostly novels and short stories) in the first half of the twentieth century.  Authors will include: Jean Rhys, Nella Larson, Virginia Woolf, Colette (in translation) and Katherine Mansfield.

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33633

Kaufman, Heidi

The Nineteenth-Century British Novel

This course focuses on the novel’s shifting development in the nineteenth century.  We’ll consider how each generation and/or individual writer boldly overturned, pushed, revised, challenged, or otherwise re-imagined the form and content of the novel.... (read more)

33634

LeMenager, Stephanie

The Northwest figures in literary imagination as many nations--the Indigenous nations whose homelands comprise the region, the utopian or countercultural nations imagined by settlers (i.e. Ecotopia, Cascadia), the dystopic nationalism performed through Japanese internment, systemic racism, and... (read more)

33637

Wood, Mary

This course will examine the constellation of history, memory, and family that informs so much of Jewish-American literature.  While we will read a handful of pre-2000 texts to get a sense of the wider history and contexts of Jewish literature, the focus of the course this term will be on twenty... (read more)

33641

Barter, Faith

This course examines the 19th-century American novel through two of its strangest and most intricate epics: Martin Delany’s Blake, or the Huts of America and Herman Melville’s Moby-Dick. By focusing on these two novels, we will pay particular attention to how 19th-century novelists... (read more)

33642

Peppis, Paul

ENG 394 is the first in a two-part chronological, upper division survey of modern literature from America, Britain, and Europe. The course incorporates works of drama, poetry, and prose, and attends closely to philosophical, political, and cultural events that run parallel to developments in... (read more)

33652

Upton, Corbett

2008 marks the beginning of an epochal shift in American life and culture: the election of Barak Obama, the first African American President of the United States; the Great Recession;  the smartphone; the proliferation of social media platforms; the discovery, extraction, and exploitation of... (read more)

33653

Kelp-Stebbins, Kate

In the last two decades, comics journalism has become one of the most provocative forms of creative nonfiction and an essential field of comics art. University of Oregon alum Joe Sacco, who received his BA in journalism in 1981, effectively founded contemporary comics journalism through his... (read more)

35637

Instructor:  Stefanie Lethbridge

Heroes and (less often) heroines are the embodiment of a culture’s ideals and ethical standards. They might defend traditional ideals, or they might help to usher in new standards – and in doing so they more often than not travel (or even conquer) the world... (read more)

22465

Kaufman, Heidi

Literature of the Jewish Ghetto

The idea of the ghetto—as a destination, an origin, a physical boundary, an emotional trap, a labyrinth, a prison, a haven, and an inspiration for self-determination—has been a focal point of Jewish literary culture since the seventeenth century. The first... (read more)

22468

Clevinger, Kara

Nineteenth-Century American Novel

Do you enjoy reading novels? Are you interested in writing a novel? Do you like history? This winter transport yourself with a novel to the strange and terrifying world of nineteenth-century America. There you’ll find characters fighting enslavement and... (read more)

22469

Southworth, Helen

In this class we will focus on US and UK modernist fiction. Authors will include: Sherwood Anderson, Virginia Woolf, Jean Rhys, James Baldwin, and Katherine Mansfield. In each case, pairing literary analysis with a book historical approach, we’ll read the works up against their publishing... (read more)

22478

Peppis, Paul

This capstone seminar, one of the St. Louis Seminars in Poetry, studies a selection of poetry written in English during and just after World War I (WWI). The first fully technological and industrial war in history, WWI tore across the globe between 1914-1918, leaving over 9 million combatants... (read more)

22484

Saunders, Ben

Once upon a time, the four-color world of the superhero was a comfortingly simple place.  The super-powered beings of the 1940s and 50s were secure in their sense of righteousness and generally saw no contradiction between truth, justice, and the American way.  But in the 1960s, superheroes... (read more)

16687

Barter, Faith

Topic: Black Supernatural

Working from the 19th century to the present, this course will consider African American and Caribbean literature that troubles our notions of the “natural” and the “real.” Exploring narratives of hallucination, prophecy, and divination, we will study the ways... (read more)

16688

Brown, Kirby

Native American Writers (Contemporary Indigenous Women Writers): La Malinche. Pocahontas. Sacagawea. These are likely the only Indigenous women with whom many are familiar. Though real historical figures, these Indigenous women are often depicted in popular literature along a rigid spectrum as... (read more)

16690

LeMenager, Stephanie

This course begins with the question of what is the American novel? It is a question asked and answered by some of the most ingenious and challenging thinkers of the 20th century, who, as it turns out, were novelists. But for these thinkers who thought in the form of novels, the 20th century was... (read more)

16692

Pyle, Forest

What is Romanticism?

This course will be a sustained examination of the question: “What is Romanticism? This is a question which has no single or ultimate answer given that there seem to be as many answers as there are “askers.” There is, however, a rich and complex body of literature and... (read more)

32051

Barter, Faith

Working from the 19th century to the present, this course will consider African American and Afro-Caribbean literature that troubles our notions of the “natural” and the “real.” Exploring narratives of hallucination, prophecy, and divination, we will study the ways that Black writers have... (read more)

32068

Southworth, Helen

The focus of the class will be Virginia Woolf's London. We'll read the major London novels, including Jacob's Room and Mrs Dalloway, and a selection of Woolf's essays, including her The London Scene essays and A Room of One's Own.  We'll learn about Woolf's intense... (read more)

32076

Thorsson, Courtney

In this course, we will study selected writings of Toni Morrison in their historical, political, and literary contexts. In addition to Morrison's work as a novelist, we will consider her work as a literary scholar, editor, and advocate for and representative of contemporary African American... (read more)

35796

Sayre, Gordon

D’Arcy McNickle and Louise Erdrich were both born into métis or mixed-blood families on the northern plains, and wrote novels about the life of indigenous and immigrant peoples in and around a fictionalized version of a reservation, the Flathead Reservation in Montana and the Turtle Mountain... (read more)

35801

Alaimo, Stacy

Although reading novels is generally a solitary activity, the novel as a genre has not only encompassed a multitude of voices but has promoted social visions. The diverse set of novels in this class begin with William Faulkner’s weird tale of modernist alienation and isolation, moving toward... (read more)

36459

Peppis, Paul

This course participates in the ongoing reassessment of relations between aesthetic modernism and popular culture. The rise of "New Modernist studies" over the past twenty five years, with its expansive historical orientation and interest in modernism's original cultural contexts, has led to a... (read more)

36968

Johnson, Mat

In this seminar, we will examine the form of sequential art we call comic books. The course is composed of two parts: close reading of landmark graphic novels and comics, and writing of original comic scripts. Throughout the term, we will examine a wide variety of groundbreaking graphic novels,... (read more)

22068

The Black Fantastic 

In 2020, against the backdrop of a pandemic, wildfires, anti-Black violence, a global wave of protests and social unrest, and political upheaval, Octavia Butler’s 1993 Afrofuturist novel, Parable of the Sower, reached the New York Times bestseller... (read more)

22075

Kelp-Stebbins, Kate

In the last two decades, comics journalism has become one of the most provocative forms of creative nonfiction and an essential field of comics art. University of Oregon alum Joe Sacco, who received his BA in journalism in 1981, effectively founded contemporary comics journalism through his... (read more)

22085

In this course, we will study poetry of the Black Arts Movement (BAM) in its literary, political, and cultural contexts. BAM is the cultural arm of the Black Power Movement and was at its peak from about 1965 to about 1976. BAM writers are diverse in terms of form, genre, gender, geography, and... (read more)

26411

Brown, Kirby

La Malinche. Pocahontas. Sacagawea. These are likely the only Indigenous women with whom many are familiar. Though real historical figures, these Indigenous women are often depicted in popular literature along a rigid spectrum as race traitors or colonial sympathizers, virtuous princesses or... (read more)

26417

Pyle, Forest

British Romantic Writers

This course will be a sustained examination of the question: “What is Romanticism? This is a question which has no single or ultimate answer given that there seem to be as many answers as there are “askers.” There is, however, a rich and complex body of literature... (read more)

26419

Saunders, Ben

Once upon a time, the four-color world of the superhero was a comfortingly simple place.  Whether they came from distant galaxies or our home planet, the super-powered beings of the 1940s and 50s were secure in their sense of righteousness and generally saw no contradiction between truth,... (read more)

41840

Clevinger, Kara

Escape! Whether we’re reading for pleasure or entertainment, the novel has been a means of escape for readers: an escape from reality, from the anxieties or doldrums of everyday life and into other lives and worlds. For nineteenth-century American readers who craved a fictional escape,... (read more)

41842

Upton, Corbett

After the end of the world

after death

I found myself in the midst of life

creating myself

building life

--“In the Midst of Life,” Tadeusz Rózewicz

After the cataclysm of WWII, the old order was beginning to crumble. In this aftermath, many artists viewed the... (read more)

32171

Johnson, Mat

In this seminar, we will examine the form of sequential art we call comic books. The course is composed of two parts: close reading of landmark... (read more)

32177

Rossi, William

This course could be called “The Thoreau You Don’t Know.”  Although commonly known as an insufferable hermit, a strange guy who turned his back on... (read more)

36489

Quigley, Mark

Narrating the Sunset of the British Empire: The Twentieth-Century Novel from Modernism to Postmodernism

... (read more)
36495

Clevinger, Kara

Identity fraud! “America” as place, myth, and dream has long been imagined as where people can be whatever they want to be and are free to... (read more)

36498

Gershow, Miriam

We are in unprecedented times, and what matters to me about this course is that we read together, talk about books together, and bring the authors... (read more)

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