WR423 201703 Undergraduate

Term: 
Spring 2018
Course: 
WR 423
Applies To: 
Undergraduate
Sections: 
Title: 
Advanced Composition: Style, Tone, Point of View
Instructors: 

Jenée Wilde

Jenée Wilde profile picture
  • Title: Career Instructor
  • Phone: 541-346-1051
  • Office: 331 PLC
  • Office Hours: Spring term: W 2-3, R 1:30-3:30 or by appt.
Department Section Description: 

An assumption persists in writing courses that academic and literary essays are distinct -  critical writers formulate arguments and manage subjective experiences with facts for the sake of accuracy or correctness, while literary writers endeavor to capture the idiosyncrasies of their consciousness for the sake of personal expression and exploration. In practice, however, the very best critical writing across disciplines demonstrates both intellectual and aesthetic excellence. Drawing upon exemplary work from a range of disciplines, this course centers on “the essay” as a flexible form that succeeds not only through what writers say but how they say it. Reading and writing assignments emphasizes style, tone, and point of view in the development of written reasoning. Moreover, the course’s workshop design and non-traditional grading structure encourage writing processes, peer feedback, and risk-taking as modes of learning, with a strong emphasis on democratic student involvement in course content, writing projects, and assessment. Major writing assignments are structured to engage the disciplinary and professional aspirations of students through development of both critical thinking and personal style. Students will develop their voices not only in writing but also through acts of speaking and listening. Through classroom guests and activities, the course engages writing as a performance for audiences in a variety of public spheres.

Textbook: Crosscurrents: Reading in the Disciplines by Eric C. Link and Steven P. Frye (2013)

Fulfills: 

Old Major: F-Upper-Division Elective

Upper-division Elective courses allow students to choose (or “elect”) courses or faculty specific to their own developing interests, enabling them thereby to shape their own educational experience.

Writing

Writing Requirement courses focus on the technical terms and conceptual principles needed to write clear, grammatical prose aimed at communicating with force and logic.  Upper-division courses focus on professional writing and the creation of individual styles.

Upper-Division Elective

Upper-division Elective courses allow students to choose (or “elect”) courses or faculty specific to their own developing interests, enabling them thereby to shape their own educational experience.

WSCR Minor

The interdisciplinary minor in Writing, Public Speaking, and Critical Reasoning offers students a coherent program of courses that strengthen students' abilities to write well, to speak effectively in public, and to think critically. This minor is built on courses in English, Writing, and Philosophy and is taught by professors from English, Philosophy, and the Honors College.

WSCR Certificate

Writing, Public Speaking, and Critical Reasoning Certificate courses strengthen students' abilities to write well, to speak effectively in public, and to think critically.  This certificate program is built on courses in English, Writing, and Philosophy and is taught by professors from English, Philosophy, and the Honors College.

English Minor

English Minor courses offer students centuries of cultural experience and representation in poetry, prose, drama, film, TV, new media, and folk artifacts.  The English minor can focus and extend the values of a liberal arts education, while also providing extensive training in writing, speaking, and critical thinking.