FLR483 201802 Undergraduate

Term: 
Winter 2019
Course: 
FLR 483
Applies To: 
Undergraduate
Sections: 
Title: 
Folklore and Mythology of the British Isles
Instructors: 

Dianne Dugaw

Dianne Dugaw profile picture
  • Title: Professor
  • Phone: 541-346-1496
  • Office: 458 PLC
  • Office Hours: Available by email
Department Section Description: 

This course traces ethnicity, cultural interaction, and forms of folkloristic expression in the British Isles and Ireland. Britain and Ireland possess a complex cultural history. Beginning with the prehistoric Celts, we will trace interactions and identities of historically documented base cultures in the region, especially as their cultural legacies have endured. The course focuses on (1) deep structures of myth, belief, and worldview from the past; and (2) persisting traditions and cultural practices. We will examine such forms of folklore as myths, stories, material culture, worship, ritual, belief, music, song, dance, drama, and custom. We will consider British folklore up to the present day in the context of community & individual values and arts.

Fulfills: 

Major I: B-Literature 1500-1789

Literature, 1500-1789 courses focus on writings during the period of European exploration and colonization -- from the early English Renaissance to the late eighteenth-century -- in order to foster familiarity with key works in British and American literary history.  Literary history illustrates how literary works reflect, address, and resist the social and political environments in which they are produced as well as other works that have preceded them.  The study of early periods in particular sensitizes readers to historical transformations of the language itself.

Major I: E-Folklore, Ethnic & Women's Literature

Folklore/Ethnic/Women’s Literature courses focus on works  in Folklore, ethnic American writing, and writing by women.

Major II: B-Literature 1500-1789

Literature, 1500-1789 courses focus on writings during the period of European exploration and colonization -- from the early English Renaissance to the late eighteenth-century -- in order to foster familiarity with key works in British and American literary history.  Literary history illustrates how literary works reflect, address, and resist the social and political environments in which they are produced as well as other works that have preceded them.  The study of early periods in particular sensitizes readers to historical transformations of the language itself.

Major II: E-Media/Folklore/Culture

Media, Folklore, and/or Culture courses focus on print and non-print media to explore culture and its processes of creative expression.