ENG428 201901 Undergraduate

Term: 
Fall 2019
Course: 
ENG 428
Applies To: 
Undergraduate
Sections: 
Title: 
Old English I
Instructors: 

Martha Bayless

Martha Bayless profile picture
  • Title: Professor, English
  • Additional Title: Director, Folklore and Public Culture
  • Phone: 541-346-3930
  • Office: 344 PLC
  • Office Hours: Spring term: TUES/THUR 2:30-4:00
Department Section Description: 

This is the first in a three-course sequence aimed at reading and understanding Old English, the language of the Anglo-Saxons (the English between 449 and 1066). In this first term of Old English we will concentrate on bringing reading skills up to speed, so you will be able to read Old English literature (taught in later terms of the course) with some fluency. Thus the focus of this term will be learning the language, although we will also read some interesting texts (wisdom-literature, riddles, etc.) and acquire some background in Anglo-Saxon history and culture.

Fulfills: 

A-Literature Pre-1500

Literature, Pre-1500 courses focus on writings produced from the Anglo-Saxon to late medieval periods to foster familiarity with key works in British and American literary history.  Literary history illustrates how literary works reflect, address, and resist the social and political environments in which they are produced as well as other works that have preceded them.  The study of early periods in particular sensitizes readers to historical transformations of the language itself.

English Minor

English Minor courses offer students centuries of cultural experience and representation in poetry, prose, drama, film, TV, new media, and folk artifacts.  The English minor can focus and extend the values of a liberal arts education, while also providing extensive training in writing, speaking, and critical thinking.
 

Old Major: A-Literature Pre-1500

Literature, Pre-1500 courses focus on writings produced from the Anglo-Saxon to late medieval periods to foster familiarity with key works in British and American literary history.  Literary history illustrates how literary works reflect, address, and resist the social and political environments in which they are produced as well as other works that have preceded them.  The study of early periods in particular sensitizes readers to historical transformations of the language itself.