ENG428 201801 Undergraduate

Term: 
Fall 2018
Course: 
ENG 428
Applies To: 
Undergraduate
Sections: 
Title: 
Old English I
Instructors: 

Martha Bayless

Martha Bayless profile picture
  • Title: Professor, English
  • Phone: 541-346-3930
  • Office: 344 PLC
  • Office Hours: Spring term: TUES/THUR 2:30-4:00
Department Section Description: 

This is a course in learning to read and understand Old English, the language of the Anglo-Saxons (the English between 449 and 1066).  We will read some riddles and a wisdom text that tells you everything a tenth-century English warrior or devout maiden needed to know, and in addition learn a great deal about the language, such as why English is so annoying to spell. This class is the first in a three-class sequence which will eventually lead up to reading about (and potentially reenacting) battles and Beowulf, and is not designed to stand alone. Do take it if you are also able to take the winter and spring terms of the course.

Sequence with ENG 429, 430.

Prereq: Junior standing.

Fulfills: 

Major I: A-Literature Pre-1500

Literature, Pre-1500 courses focus on writings produced from the Anglo-Saxon to late medieval periods to foster familiarity with key works in British and American literary history.  Literary history illustrates how literary works reflect, address, and resist the social and political environments in which they are produced as well as other works that have preceded them.  The study of early periods in particular sensitizes readers to historical transformations of the language itself.

Major II: A-Literature Pre-1500

Literature, Pre-1500 courses focus on writings produced from the Anglo-Saxon to late medieval periods to foster familiarity with key works in British and American literary history.  Literary history illustrates how literary works reflect, address, and resist the social and political environments in which they are produced as well as other works that have preceded them.  The study of early periods in particular sensitizes readers to historical transformations of the language itself.