ENG407 202003 Undergraduate

Term: 
Spring 2021
Course: 
ENG 407
Applies To: 
Undergraduate
Course Description: 

Selected seminars offered each year. Repeatable up to five times.

Sections: 
Title: 
Seminar: Virginia Woolf
Instructors: 

Helen Southworth

Helen Southworth profile picture
  • Title: Professor
  • Phone: 541-346-2642
  • Office: 323 Chapman Hall
  • Office Hours: S21: M 12-2 & by appt.
Department Section Description: 

The focus of the class will be Virginia Woolf's London. We'll read the major London novels, including Jacob's Room and Mrs Dalloway, and a selection of Woolf's essays, including her The London Scene essays and A Room of One's Own.  We'll learn about Woolf's intense love for her native city, her engagement with the London publishing world and the network of artists, writers and intellectuals from whom she drew inspiration.

Fulfills: 

C-Literature 1789-Present

Literature, 1789 to the present courses focus on literary work produced over more than two centuries -- from the period of British romanticism and the early republic of the United States up to now -- in order to foster familiarity with key works in British and American literary history.  Literary history illustrates how literary works reflect, address, and resist the social and political environments in which they are produced as well as other works that have preceded them.

F-Gender/Ability/Queer Studies/Sexuality

Gender, Ability, Queer Studies, and/or Sexuality courses focus on the ways that issues of sexuality, gender, queerness, and disability are represented, critiqued, and developed in media and literature.

English Minor

English Minor courses offer students centuries of cultural experience and representation in poetry, prose, drama, film, TV, new media, and folk artifacts.  The English minor can focus and extend the values of a liberal arts education, while also providing extensive training in writing, speaking, and critical thinking.
 

Title: 
Seminar: Writing for Comics
Instructors: 

Mat Johnson

Mat Johnson profile picture
  • Title: Professor
  • Phone: 541-346-0547
  • Office: 207 Alder Bldg.
  • Office Hours: S21 Tuesday 2:15-4:15
Department Section Description: 

In this seminar, we will examine the form of sequential art we call comic books. The course is composed of two parts: close reading of landmark graphic novels and comics, and writing of original comic scripts. Throughout the term, we will examine a wide variety of groundbreaking graphic novels, both domestic and international. Script writing will focus on construction of story in general, and visual storytelling in particular. Submission of visual or written creative sample required.

Fulfills: 

C-Literature 1789-Present

Literature, 1789 to the present courses focus on literary work produced over more than two centuries -- from the period of British romanticism and the early republic of the United States up to now -- in order to foster familiarity with key works in British and American literary history.  Literary history illustrates how literary works reflect, address, and resist the social and political environments in which they are produced as well as other works that have preceded them.

E-Media/Folklore/Culture

Media, Folklore, and/or Culture courses focus on print and non-print media to explore culture and its processes of creative expression.

English Minor

English Minor courses offer students centuries of cultural experience and representation in poetry, prose, drama, film, TV, new media, and folk artifacts.  The English minor can focus and extend the values of a liberal arts education, while also providing extensive training in writing, speaking, and critical thinking.
 

Comics Studies Minor

Comics Studies Minor courses present students with an international, historical, and critical perspective on the art of editorial cartoons, comic books, and graphic novels, and how these forms communicate, inform, and emotionally engage their audiences.  Students will be required to think outside of accustomed disciplinary boundaries, and to analyze and experiment with the interaction of both visual and linguistic systems of meaning.