ENG407 201903 undergraduate

Term: 
Spring 2020
Course: 
ENG 407
Applies To: 
Undergraduate
Sections: 
Title: 
Seminar: Writing for Comics
Instructors: 

Mat Johnson

Mat Johnson profile picture
  • Title: Professor
  • Phone: 541-346-0547
  • Office: 207 Alder Bldg.
  • Office Hours: S20 Online 10am-12pm on Tuesday and by appointment
Department Section Description: 

In this seminar, we will examine the form of sequential art we call comic books. The course is composed of two parts: close reading of landmark graphic novels and comics, and writing of original comic scripts. Throughout the term, we will examine a wide variety of groundbreaking graphic novels, both domestic and international. Script writing will focus on construction of story in general, and visual storytelling in particular.

Fulfills: 

C-Literature 1789-Present

Literature, 1789 to the present courses focus on literary work produced over more than two centuries -- from the period of British romanticism and the early republic of the United States up to now -- in order to foster familiarity with key works in British and American literary history.  Literary history illustrates how literary works reflect, address, and resist the social and political environments in which they are produced as well as other works that have preceded them.

E-Media/Folklore/Culture

Media, Folklore, and/or Culture courses focus on print and non-print media to explore culture and its processes of creative expression.

English Minor

English Minor courses offer students centuries of cultural experience and representation in poetry, prose, drama, film, TV, new media, and folk artifacts.  The English minor can focus and extend the values of a liberal arts education, while also providing extensive training in writing, speaking, and critical thinking.
 

Comics Studies Minor

Comics Studies Minor courses present students with an international, historical, and critical perspective on the art of editorial cartoons, comic books, and graphic novels, and how these forms communicate, inform, and emotionally engage their audiences.  Students will be required to think outside of accustomed disciplinary boundaries, and to analyze and experiment with the interaction of both visual and linguistic systems of meaning.

Old Major: C-Literature 1789-Present

Literature, 1789 to the present courses focus on literary work produced over more than two centuries -- from the period of British romanticism and the early republic of the United States up to now -- in order to foster familiarity with key works in British and American literary history.  Literary history illustrates how literary works reflect, address, and resist the social and political environments in which they are produced as well as other works that have preceded them.

Title: 
Seminar: Animals, Ethics, Environment
Instructors: 

Stacy Alaimo

Stacy Alaimo profile picture
  • Title: Professor
  • Additional Title: Core Faculty, Environmental Studies
  • Phone: 541-346-1476
  • Office: 205 PLC
  • Office Hours: S20 - TUES 3:30-4:30, THUR 3:30-5:00 virtual; email for Zoom appt.
  • Website: Website
Department Section Description: 

This course brings together critical animal studies and environmental studies.

  • The first unit asks what would it be like to be a bat or an octopus or some other species. Imagining the perspectives of other species leads us to consider wider philosophical debates about animals and ethics.
  • The second unit examines human animal relations and the concept of “the animal.” The Western concept of “the animal” has harmed not only nonhuman species but people categorized through grids of race, class, gender, and disability.
  • The third unit focuses on environmental theories and speculations about environmental futures, asking us to consider what sort of world we want in the future.

We will not only read many important and thought-provoking essays but will also watch, look at and discuss, art, animation, short and lively lectures, and other creative media. I’m hoping the mix of media into what was originally an in-person theory class will help make the course more lively and engaging. Required Texts: [Purchase this book ASAP] The Animals Reader: The Essential Classic and Contemporary Writings, ed. Linda Kalof and Amy Fitzgerald. ISBN-10: 1845204700 ISBN-13: 978-1845204709.


Other readings will be posted on Canvas as PDFs. Videos, art, and short readings will also be on the internet. You will need internet access for the class. 

 

Fulfills: 

D-Theory/Rhetoric

Theory/Rhetoric courses teach media theory, the major modes and schools of criticism and theory, and theories and techniques of reasoning, rational discourse, and argumentation.

E-Media/Folklore/Culture

Media, Folklore, and/or Culture courses focus on print and non-print media to explore culture and its processes of creative expression.

English Minor

English Minor courses offer students centuries of cultural experience and representation in poetry, prose, drama, film, TV, new media, and folk artifacts.  The English minor can focus and extend the values of a liberal arts education, while also providing extensive training in writing, speaking, and critical thinking.
 

Old Major: D-Literary Theory/Criticism

Literary Theory/Criticism courses teach academic and rigorous media comprehension, the major modes and schools of criticism and theory, and theories and techniques of reasoning, rational discourse, and argumentation.