ENG407 201901 Undergraduate

Term: 
Fall 2019
Course: 
ENG 407
Applies To: 
Undergraduate
Sections: 
Title: 
Seminar: Madness, Place, Story
Instructors: 

Mary Wood

Mary Wood profile picture
  • Title: Professor
  • Additional Title: Director of Graduate Studies
  • Phone: 541-346-3010
  • Office: 445 PLC
  • Office Hours: Fall term: MON 3-5, THUR 12-2
Department Section Description: 

In this interdisciplinary course, we will read creative nonfiction about first-hand experiences of mental and emotional suffering, analyzing them in relation to larger cultural representations of madness/mental illness/neurological difference. In particular, we will look at the relationship of story-telling about such suffering to understandings of place and identity, reading first-person texts as counter-narratives within the history of psychiatric diagnosis, treatment, unequal distribution of mental health care, and the stigmatization of mental illness. As part of their work for the course, students will work with university archivists and art museum curators to identify, analyze, and present works of creative expression related to mental and emotional suffering.

Fulfills: 

Upper-Division Elective

Upper-division Elective courses allow students to choose (or “elect”) courses or faculty specific to their own developing interests, enabling them thereby to shape their own educational experience.

English Minor

English Minor courses offer students centuries of cultural experience and representation in poetry, prose, drama, film, TV, new media, and folk artifacts.  The English minor can focus and extend the values of a liberal arts education, while also providing extensive training in writing, speaking, and critical thinking.
 

Old Major: F-Upper-Division Elective

Upper-division Elective courses allow students to choose (or “elect”) courses or faculty specific to their own developing interests, enabling them thereby to shape their own educational experience.

Title: 
Seminar: Modern American Poetry
Instructors: 

Mark Whalan

Mark Whalan profile picture
  • Title: Professor
  • Additional Title: Horn Endowed Professor
  • Phone: 541-346-3926
  • Office: 207 PLC
  • Office Hours: Fall Term: Monday 1-2pm, Wednesday 10-12pm
Department Section Description: 

This course will give a survey of American poetry in English from 1900 to 1950. In a historical time of enormous social and political upheaval, poets struggled with a series of urgent questions. These included the relationship of poems to political commitments; the ontological question of how the word related to the world; how new social and technological forms required new literary forms and experiences of perception; and how poetry’s unique qualities of representation could be of value to the modern consciousness. Women and African American poets sought answers to these questions whilst articulating a difference and a distance from poetic traditions that sometimes tacitly and sometimes explicitly sought to exclude them. This class will explore the extraordinary range of poetry from the first half of the twentieth century, the debates that went on between poets, and how contemporary critics and theorists have conceptualized their work. Topics will include modernism and its discontents; imagism and after; poetry and the nation; poetry and mass culture; and the poetics of identity. Poets studied will include T. S. Eliot, Ezra Pound, William Carlos Williams, Gertrude Stein, Langston Hughes, Gwendolyn Brooks, W. H. Auden, Wallace Stevens, and Elizabeth Bishop.

Fulfills: 

Upper-Division Elective

Upper-division Elective courses allow students to choose (or “elect”) courses or faculty specific to their own developing interests, enabling them thereby to shape their own educational experience.

English Minor

English Minor courses offer students centuries of cultural experience and representation in poetry, prose, drama, film, TV, new media, and folk artifacts.  The English minor can focus and extend the values of a liberal arts education, while also providing extensive training in writing, speaking, and critical thinking.
 

Old Major: F-Upper-Division Elective

Upper-division Elective courses allow students to choose (or “elect”) courses or faculty specific to their own developing interests, enabling them thereby to shape their own educational experience.