ENG407 201803 Undergraduate

Term: 
Spring 2019
Course: 
ENG 407
Applies To: 
Undergraduate
Sections: 
Title: 
Seminar: Yeats Poet/Mage
Instructors: 

Mark Quigley

Mark Quigley profile picture
  • Title: Associate Professor
  • Phone: 541-346-1340
  • Office: 324 PLC
  • Office Hours: Spring term: TUES 12-2 & WED 1-2
Department Section Description: 

This course will explore the remarkable literary legacy of W.B. Yeats whose groundbreaking work charted the turmoil of revolution, war, and the collapse of a larger world order at the beginning of the twentieth century.

 

We will examine the long trajectory of Yeats's fifty-year career as he moves from the romantic nationalism of the Celtic Twilight to the "terrible beauty" of the Irish War of Independence and Civil War and consider the modernism of his later career with its portents of the nightmare of fascism about to descend over Europe.

 

Assessing Yeats's role as the central figure of the Irish Literary Revival, we will reflect on his approach to the question of developing a distinct Irish national literature that might challenge the cultural bases of the British empire and negotiate the complexities of a new postcolonial culture emerging in the early 1920s.

 

At the same time, we will consider Yeats's contributions as a major modernist thinker and poet working to re-imagine literary form amidst the crises of the early twentieth century. As part of this exploration, we will look at Yeats's often controversial role in founding and developing the world-renowned Abbey Theatre. We will also be examining selections from Yeats's mystical and philosophic writing to trace some of the broader sources giving rise to his intricate theories of history and aesthetics that crucially shaped the politics of modernist art and thought.

 

Note: Please contact this professor directly for copies of the section syllabus

Fulfills: 

Old Major: C-Literature 1789-Present

Literature, 1789 to the present courses focus on literary work produced over more than two centuries -- from the period of British romanticism and the early republic of the United States up to now -- in order to foster familiarity with key works in British and American literary history.  Literary history illustrates how literary works reflect, address, and resist the social and political environments in which they are produced as well as other works that have preceded them.

C-Literature 1789-Present

Literature, 1789 to the present courses focus on literary work produced over more than two centuries -- from the period of British romanticism and the early republic of the United States up to now -- in order to foster familiarity with key works in British and American literary history.  Literary history illustrates how literary works reflect, address, and resist the social and political environments in which they are produced as well as other works that have preceded them.

G-Empire/Race/Ethnicity

Empire, Race, and/or Ethnicity courses focus on ways that race matters in literature, media, and culture.  Recent courses have examined such matters as native American literature and film; nineteenth-century writings by slavers and enslaved people in the U.S. and British colonies; fiction and filmmaking in post-apartheid South Africa; Latinx science fiction and environmental justice, and the novels of Toni Morrison.

English Minor

English Minor courses offer students centuries of cultural experience and representation in poetry, prose, drama, film, TV, new media, and folk artifacts.  The English minor can focus and extend the values of a liberal arts education, while also providing extensive training in writing, speaking, and critical thinking.
 

Title: 
Seminar: Writing for Comics
Instructors: 

Mat Johnson

Mat Johnson profile picture
  • Title: Professor
  • Office: Alder building 207
  • Office Hours: Spring term: T 10:30-1:30
Department Section Description: 

In this seminar, we will examine the form of sequential art we call comic books. The course is composed of two parts: close reading of landmark graphic novels and comics, and writing of original comic scripts. Throughout the term, we will examine a wide variety of groundbreaking graphic novels, both domestic and international. Script writing will focus on construction of story in general, and visual storytelling in particular.

Fulfills: 

Old Major: C-Literature 1789-Present

Literature, 1789 to the present courses focus on literary work produced over more than two centuries -- from the period of British romanticism and the early republic of the United States up to now -- in order to foster familiarity with key works in British and American literary history.  Literary history illustrates how literary works reflect, address, and resist the social and political environments in which they are produced as well as other works that have preceded them.

C-Literature 1789-Present

Literature, 1789 to the present courses focus on literary work produced over more than two centuries -- from the period of British romanticism and the early republic of the United States up to now -- in order to foster familiarity with key works in British and American literary history.  Literary history illustrates how literary works reflect, address, and resist the social and political environments in which they are produced as well as other works that have preceded them.

E-Media/Folklore/Culture

Media, Folklore, and/or Culture courses focus on print and non-print media to explore culture and its processes of creative expression.

Comics Studies Minor

Comics Studies Minor courses present students with an international, historical, and critical perspective on the art of editorial cartoons, comic books, and graphic novels, and how these forms communicate, inform, and emotionally engage their audiences.  Students will be required to think outside of accustomed disciplinary boundaries, and to analyze and experiment with the interaction of both visual and linguistic systems of meaning.

English Minor

English Minor courses offer students centuries of cultural experience and representation in poetry, prose, drama, film, TV, new media, and folk artifacts.  The English minor can focus and extend the values of a liberal arts education, while also providing extensive training in writing, speaking, and critical thinking.