ENG407 201703 Undergraduate

Term: 
Spring 2018
Course: 
ENG 407
Applies To: 
Undergraduate
Sections: 
Title: 
Seminar: Claude McKay “a fierce hatred of injustice”
Instructors: 

Corbett Upton

Corbett Upton profile picture
  • Title: Career Instructor
  • Additional Title: Associate Director of Undergraduate Studies
  • Phone: 541-346-3961
  • Office: 375 PLC
  • Office Hours: Winter term: TR 10-12, and by appt
Department Section Description: 

Credited with inaugurating the Harlem Renaissance and inspiring the Negrítude movement, Claude McKay is best known as America’s most important protest sonneteer. McKay’s storied literary career documents the life of a black expatriate modern and his sense of the Black Atlantic experience during the first half of the twentieth century. Born in Jamaica in 1889, McKay is often limited to his work in the United States in the 1920s. According to the received story, McKay only develops his true poetic voice and political impulses in the United States, not as a product of the Black Diaspora, the sphere of English colonialism and American influence abroad, or international socialism. This St. Louis Seminar seeks to expand the borders of McKay’s poetry by examining key portions of McKay’s oeuvre to illuminate not only the nostalgic immigrant protest sonneteer of Harlem but also the young Jamaican anti-colonial nationalist, free-thinker, immigrant, radical, world traveler, and convert to Catholicism—a modern poet who employed traditional forms to deal directly with specific places and events, specific political and social conditions. This course will also explore the nuances of American identity and cultural influence outside an exclusively Anglo-American configuration. While the class will focus primarily on McKay’s poetry, it will also deal with his most important journalism, novels, and memoir.

Fulfills: 

Major I: C-Literature 1789-Present

Literature, 1789 to the present courses focus on literary work produced over more than two centuries -- from the period of British romanticism and the early republic of the United States up to now -- in order to foster familiarity with key works in British and American literary history.  Literary history illustrates how literary works reflect, address, and resist the social and political environments in which they are produced as well as other works that have preceded them.

Major II: C-Literature 1789-Present

Literature, 1789 to the present courses focus on literary work produced over more than two centuries -- from the period of British romanticism and the early republic of the United States up to now -- in order to foster familiarity with key works in British and American literary history.  Literary history illustrates how literary works reflect, address, and resist the social and political environments in which they are produced as well as other works that have preceded them.

Major I: E-Folklore, Ethnic & Women's Literature

Folklore/Ethnic/Women’s Literature courses focus on works  in Folklore, ethnic American writing, and writing by women.

Major II: G-Empire/Race/Ethnicity

Empire, Race, and/or Ethnicity courses focus on ways that race matters in literature, media, and culture.  Recent courses have examined such matters as native American literature and film; nineteenth-century writings by slavers and enslaved people in the U.S. and British colonies; fiction and filmmaking in post-apartheid South Africa; Latinx science fiction and environmental justice, and the novels of Toni Morrison.

Title: 
Seminar: Writing for Comics
Department Section Description: 

In this seminar, professional comics writer Jen Van Meter (Hopeless SavagesThe Death Defying Doctor Mirage) will help students explore the function and demands of the script as a technical tool in the process of making contemporary comics. Readings will include professional scripts and comics across a range of genres and production/publication models. Discussion and exercises will address formal conventions and script utility toward effectively communicating the creative goals for the finished comic. Over the term, students will produce 2-3 original short comic scripts and related sample supporting documents.

Class size limited to a maximum of fourteen students.

Fulfills: 

Major I: F-Upper-Division Elective

Upper-division Elective courses allow students to choose (or “elect”) courses or faculty specific to their own developing interests, enabling them thereby to shape their own educational experience.

Major II: Upper-Division Elective

Upper-division Elective courses allow students to choose (or “elect”) courses or faculty specific to their own developing interests, enabling them thereby to shape their own educational experience.

Comics Studies Minor

Comics Studies Minor courses present students with an international, historical, and critical perspective on the art of editorial cartoons, comic books, and graphic novels, and how these forms communicate, inform, and emotionally engage their audiences.  Students will be required to think outside of accustomed disciplinary boundaries, and to analyze and experiment with the interaction of both visual and linguistic systems of meaning.