ENG407 201702 Undergraduate

Term: 
Winter 2018
Course: 
ENG 407
Applies To: 
Undergraduate
Sections: 
Title: 
Seminar: Poetry and Pragmatism
Instructors: 

Henry Wonham

Henry Wonham profile picture
  • Title: Professor
  • Additional Title:
  • Phone: 541-346-3918
  • Office: 274 PLC
  • Office Hours: Winter term: MW 1:30-3:00
Department Section Description: 

Students in ENG 407, “Poetry and Pragmatism,” the St. Louis Seminar in Poetry, will read, discuss, and write about major American poetry of the 19th, 20th, and 21st centuries using the philosophical lens of pragmatism to guide their inquiry.  The course will prioritize poetry by Emily Dickinson, Robert Frost, Wallace Stevens, and Elizabeth Bishop, though other writers will play an important role. The philosophical inspiration for this adventure in reading is Ralph Waldo Emerson, whose essays will form a foundation for the theoretical issues at stake in the class.  The literary critic whose thinking most directly informs the idea of the course is Richard Poirier, whose books include The Renewal Of Literature: Emersonian Reflections, and, even more directly relevant, Poetry and Pragmatism.

Major I & II: 1789+
Fulfills: 

Major I: C-Literature 1789-Present

Literature, 1789 to the present courses focus on literary work produced over more than two centuries -- from the period of British romanticism and the early republic of the United States up to now -- in order to foster familiarity with key works in British and American literary history.  Literary history illustrates how literary works reflect, address, and resist the social and political environments in which they are produced as well as other works that have preceded them.

Major II: C-Literature 1789-Present

Literature, 1789 to the present courses focus on literary work produced over more than two centuries -- from the period of British romanticism and the early republic of the United States up to now -- in order to foster familiarity with key works in British and American literary history.  Literary history illustrates how literary works reflect, address, and resist the social and political environments in which they are produced as well as other works that have preceded them.