ENG399 202002 Undergraduate

Term: 
Winter 2021
Course: 
ENG 399
Applies To: 
Undergraduate
Course Description: 

Repeatable up to four times.

Sections: 
Title: 
Special Studies: Writing Associates
Instructors: 

Kate Myers

Kate Myers profile picture
  • Title: Senior Instructor
  • Additional Title: Director of Writing Associates
  • Phone: 541-346-1533
  • Office: 301J Tykeson Hall
  • Office Hours: Spring 2021: Zoom | Wednesdays, 11 am - 2 pm, and by appointment
Department Section Description: 

ENG 399 Writing Associates Development is a variable-credit, hybrid, companion course designed to support tutors in ENG 404 Internship for Writing Associates. The course focuses on the professional development of the Writing Associates and their continuing study of the practice and ethics of tutoring. To these ends, the course 1) provides individualized development opportunities toward each student’s educational and professional goals; 2) engages students in both theories and praxes of tutoring, teaching, and other writing-related fields, extending the pedagogical work begun in WR 312 Principles of Tutoring; and 3) complements the ENG 404 Internship with practical support, peer- and near-peer mentoring, and self-reflection on the tasks of tutoring. In pursuit of these components, this course prioritizes inquiry, invention, and experimentation. It values reflection, empathy, and peer-support as key elements of development. It aims to foster the aspirations of the individual writing associates, the collective learning of this cohort, and the growth of the Writing Associates Program.

Upper-Division Elective after accumulating 4 credits.

Fulfills: 
Title: 
Special Studies: Comics Journalism
Instructors: 

Kate Kelp-Stebbins

Kate Kelp-Stebbins profile picture
  • Title: Assistant Professor
  • Phone: 541-346-3988
  • Office: 333 PLC
  • Office Hours: Spring 2021: M 2-5pm
  • Website: Website
Department Section Description: 

In the last two decades, comics journalism has become one of the most provocative forms of creative nonfiction and an essential field of comics art. University of Oregon alum Joe Sacco, who received his BA in journalism in 1981, effectively founded contemporary comics journalism through his graphic reportage in Safe Area Goražde (2000), Palestine (2001), Paying the Land (2020), and numerous other projects. In this class we will engage with primary examples of the genre and critically interrogate its categorical difference from other genres of comics and nonfiction. Repudiating both the ever-increasing rapidity of the 24-hour news cycle as well as the valorization of journalistic objectivity, journalists who use comics and graphic narrative to document current events and human rights struggles insist that careful witnessing takes time and involves human subjects. From displaced persons in refugee camps (Sacco 2013; Glidden 2016; Evans 2018) to frontline workers in a pandemic (Bui 2020), the humans who drive comics journalism are likewise rendered by the work of human hands, which draw and record their stories. In the age of Russian bots and fake news, comics journalism reframes conceptualizations of accuracy and truth.  

Fulfills: 

C-Literature 1789-Present

Literature, 1789 to the present courses focus on literary work produced over more than two centuries -- from the period of British romanticism and the early republic of the United States up to now -- in order to foster familiarity with key works in British and American literary history.  Literary history illustrates how literary works reflect, address, and resist the social and political environments in which they are produced as well as other works that have preceded them.

E-Media/Folklore/Culture

Media, Folklore, and/or Culture courses focus on print and non-print media to explore culture and its processes of creative expression.

English Minor

English Minor courses offer students centuries of cultural experience and representation in poetry, prose, drama, film, TV, new media, and folk artifacts.  The English minor can focus and extend the values of a liberal arts education, while also providing extensive training in writing, speaking, and critical thinking.
 

Comics Studies Minor

Comics Studies Minor courses present students with an international, historical, and critical perspective on the art of editorial cartoons, comic books, and graphic novels, and how these forms communicate, inform, and emotionally engage their audiences.  Students will be required to think outside of accustomed disciplinary boundaries, and to analyze and experiment with the interaction of both visual and linguistic systems of meaning.

Title: 
Special Studies: Shakespeare's World
Instructors: 

Brent Dawson

Brent Dawson profile picture
  • Title: Assistant Professor
  • Phone: 541-346-3962
  • Office: 473 PLC
  • Office Hours: Spring 2021: Friday 10-1
Department Section Description: 

Students in “Shakespeare’s World” learn to read Shakespeare’s works in relation to the cultural, literary, and historical contexts in which he wrote. This can be a first course in Shakespeare (no prerequisites). In Winter 2021, students will read Hamlet in relation to earlier revenge tragedies as well as developing early modern ideas of consciousness. They will also study King Lear while learning about early modern ideas of human/animal relations and theories of political authority. We will look at some cinematic adaptations of both plays.

Fulfills: 

B-Literature 1500-1789

Literature, 1500-1789 courses focus on writings during the period of European exploration and colonization -- from the early English Renaissance to the late eighteenth-century -- in order to foster familiarity with key works in British and American literary history.  Literary history illustrates how literary works reflect, address, and resist the social and political environments in which they are produced as well as other works that have preceded them.  The study of early periods in particular sensitizes readers to historical transformations of the language itself.

English Minor

English Minor courses offer students centuries of cultural experience and representation in poetry, prose, drama, film, TV, new media, and folk artifacts.  The English minor can focus and extend the values of a liberal arts education, while also providing extensive training in writing, speaking, and critical thinking.
 

Title: 
Special Studies: Writing Associates
Instructors: 

Kate Myers

Kate Myers profile picture
  • Title: Senior Instructor
  • Additional Title: Director of Writing Associates
  • Phone: 541-346-1533
  • Office: 301J Tykeson Hall
  • Office Hours: Spring 2021: Zoom | Wednesdays, 11 am - 2 pm, and by appointment
Department Section Description: 

ENG 399 Writing Associates Development is a variable-credit, hybrid, companion course designed to support tutors in ENG 404 Internship for Writing Associates. The course focuses on the professional development of the Writing Associates and their continuing study of the practice and ethics of tutoring. To these ends, the course 1) provides individualized development opportunities toward each student’s educational and professional goals; 2) engages students in both theories and praxes of tutoring, teaching, and other writing-related fields, extending the pedagogical work begun in WR 312 Principles of Tutoring; and 3) complements the ENG 404 Internship with practical support, peer- and near-peer mentoring, and self-reflection on the tasks of tutoring. In pursuit of these components, this course prioritizes inquiry, invention, and experimentation. It values reflection, empathy, and peer-support as key elements of development. It aims to foster the aspirations of the individual writing associates, the collective learning of this cohort, and the growth of the Writing Associates Program.

 

Upper-Division Elective after accumulating 4 credits.

Fulfills: