ENG399 201903 Undergraduate

Term: 
Spring 2020
Course: 
ENG 399
Applies To: 
Undergraduate
Sections: 
Title: 
Special Studies: Writing Associates
Instructors: 

Kate Myers

Kate Myers profile picture
  • Title: Senior Instructor
  • Additional Title: Director of Writing Associates
  • Phone: 541-346-1533
  • Office: 301J Tykeson Hall
  • Office Hours: S20 Zoom by appointment; email to schedule
Department Section Description: 

ENG 399 Writing Associates Development is a variable-credit, hybrid, companion course designed to support tutors in ENG 404 Internship for Writing Associates. The course focuses on the professional development of the Writing Associates and their continuing study of the practice and ethics of tutoring. To these ends, the course 1) provides individualized development opportunities toward each student’s educational and professional goals; 2) engages students in both theories and praxes of tutoring, teaching, and other writing-related fields, extending the pedagogical work begun in WR 312 Principles of Tutoring; and 3) complements the ENG 404 Internship with practical support, peer- and near-peer mentoring, and self-reflection on the tasks of tutoring. In pursuit of these components, this course prioritizes inquiry, invention, and experimentation. It values reflection, empathy, and peer-support as key elements of development. It aims to foster the aspirations of the individual writing associates, the collective learning of this cohort, and the growth of the Writing Associates Program. Prerequisite: WR 312. This course counts for the English major after earning four graded credits.

Fulfills: 

Upper-Division Elective

Upper-division Elective courses allow students to choose (or “elect”) courses or faculty specific to their own developing interests, enabling them thereby to shape their own educational experience.

Old Major: F-Upper-Division Elective

Upper-division Elective courses allow students to choose (or “elect”) courses or faculty specific to their own developing interests, enabling them thereby to shape their own educational experience.

Title: 
Special Studies: Writing Associates (WEB)
Instructors: 

Kate Myers

Kate Myers profile picture
  • Title: Senior Instructor
  • Additional Title: Director of Writing Associates
  • Phone: 541-346-1533
  • Office: 301J Tykeson Hall
  • Office Hours: S20 Zoom by appointment; email to schedule
Department Section Description: 

ENG 399 Writing Associates Development is a variable-credit, hybrid, companion course designed to support tutors in ENG 404 Internship for Writing Associates. The course focuses on the professional development of the Writing Associates and their continuing study of the practice and ethics of tutoring. To these ends, the course 1) provides individualized development opportunities toward each student’s educational and professional goals; 2) engages students in both theories and praxes of tutoring, teaching, and other writing-related fields, extending the pedagogical work begun in WR 312 Principles of Tutoring; and 3) complements the ENG 404 Internship with practical support, peer- and near-peer mentoring, and self-reflection on the tasks of tutoring. In pursuit of these components, this course prioritizes inquiry, invention, and experimentation. It values reflection, empathy, and peer-support as key elements of development. It aims to foster the aspirations of the individual writing associates, the collective learning of this cohort, and the growth of the Writing Associates Program. Prerequisite: WR 312. This course counts for the English major after earning four graded credits.

Fulfills: 

Upper-Division Elective

Upper-division Elective courses allow students to choose (or “elect”) courses or faculty specific to their own developing interests, enabling them thereby to shape their own educational experience.

Old Major: F-Upper-Division Elective

Upper-division Elective courses allow students to choose (or “elect”) courses or faculty specific to their own developing interests, enabling them thereby to shape their own educational experience.

Title: 
Special Studies: Living Writers
Instructors: 

Miriam Gershow

Miriam Gershow profile picture
  • Title: Senior Instructor II
  • Phone: 541-346-0051
  • Office: 237 PLC
  • Office Hours: S20 - MW 10-11:30 via email, Canvas Chat, or Zoom meeting
Department Section Description: 

We are in unprecedented times, and what matters to me about this course is that we read together, talk about books together, and bring the authors of those books into our conversations. A remote course will look different from an in-person Living Writers course, but we will still be a community of readers and learners, connecting with each other as best we can across technology.

 

Living Writers will investigate the sometimes symbiotic, sometimes complicated relationship of reader, writer and the written work.

Students in this upper level seminar will closely examine the contemporary fiction of four authors and then prepare for and lead author visits to the classroom.  Students will learn to represent and even reconsider their interpretations of texts in conversation with authors. Through reading, research and discussion, students will formulate both questions and answers about who holds the meaning of texts, how authorial intention informs a finished work, and if, when and how reader interpretation gains primacy over authorial invention. There will be opportunity for writing both creative and critical responses to the texts.

 

Spring 2020 will feature Mike Copperman, Cai Emmons, Debra Gwartney, and Mat Johnson, and we will study a novel, a short story collection, a history/memoir hybrid, and a graphic novel.

Fulfills: 

C-Literature 1789-Present

Literature, 1789 to the present courses focus on literary work produced over more than two centuries -- from the period of British romanticism and the early republic of the United States up to now -- in order to foster familiarity with key works in British and American literary history.  Literary history illustrates how literary works reflect, address, and resist the social and political environments in which they are produced as well as other works that have preceded them.

English Minor

English Minor courses offer students centuries of cultural experience and representation in poetry, prose, drama, film, TV, new media, and folk artifacts.  The English minor can focus and extend the values of a liberal arts education, while also providing extensive training in writing, speaking, and critical thinking.
 

Old Major: C-Literature 1789-Present

Literature, 1789 to the present courses focus on literary work produced over more than two centuries -- from the period of British romanticism and the early republic of the United States up to now -- in order to foster familiarity with key works in British and American literary history.  Literary history illustrates how literary works reflect, address, and resist the social and political environments in which they are produced as well as other works that have preceded them.