ENG399 201902 Undergraduate

Term: 
Winter 2020
Course: 
ENG 399
Applies To: 
Undergraduate
Sections: 
Title: 
Special Studies: Writing Associates
Instructors: 

Kate Myers

Kate Myers profile picture
  • Title: Senior Instructor
  • Additional Title: Director of Writing Associates
  • Phone: 541-346-1533
  • Office: 301J Tykeson Hall
  • Office Hours: Fall Term: MW 11-12:30 & by appt.
Department Section Description: 

ENG 399 Writing Associates Development is a variable-credit, hybrid, companion course designed to support tutors in ENG 404 Internship for Writing Associates. The course focuses on the professional development of the Writing Associates and their continuing study of the practice and ethics of tutoring. To these ends, the course 1) provides individualized development opportunities toward each student’s educational and professional goals; 2) engages students in both theories and praxes of tutoring, teaching, and other writing-related fields, extending the pedagogical work begun in WR 312 Principles of Tutoring; and 3) complements the ENG 404 Internship with practical support, peer- and near-peer mentoring, and self-reflection on the tasks of tutoring. In pursuit of these components, this course prioritizes inquiry, invention, and experimentation. It values reflection, empathy, and peer-support as key elements of development. It aims to foster the aspirations of the individual writing associates, the collective learning of this cohort, and the growth of the Writing Associates Program. Prerequisite: WR 312.

(This course counts as an upper-division elective after accumulating four credits)

Fulfills: 

Upper-Division Elective

Upper-division Elective courses allow students to choose (or “elect”) courses or faculty specific to their own developing interests, enabling them thereby to shape their own educational experience.

Old Major: F-Upper-Division Elective

Upper-division Elective courses allow students to choose (or “elect”) courses or faculty specific to their own developing interests, enabling them thereby to shape their own educational experience.

Title: 
Special Studies: Electronic Literature
Instructors: 

Tara Fickle

Tara Fickle profile picture
  • Title: Assistant Professor, English Department
  • Phone: 541-346-3979
  • Office: 372 PLC
  • Office Hours: Fall term: TUES 1:30-3:00, THUR 2:00-3:30
  • Website: Website
Department Section Description: 

What happens to literature when text moves from page to screen? This online course invites students of all majors and levels of technical expertise into a critically intensive, historically ranging, hands-on learning environment to explore how technology has transformed the way literary fiction is consumed, produced, and distributed in the digital age. Students will encounter and create a number of different media forms – including 20th and 21st century literature both “analog” and digital, hypertexts, games, and digital art – and engage with the various theories and methods used by digital humanists to study American literature and culture.

Fulfills: 

D-Theory/Rhetoric

Theory/Rhetoric courses teach media theory, the major modes and schools of criticism and theory, and theories and techniques of reasoning, rational discourse, and argumentation.

E-Media/Folklore/Culture

Media, Folklore, and/or Culture courses focus on print and non-print media to explore culture and its processes of creative expression.

English Minor

English Minor courses offer students centuries of cultural experience and representation in poetry, prose, drama, film, TV, new media, and folk artifacts.  The English minor can focus and extend the values of a liberal arts education, while also providing extensive training in writing, speaking, and critical thinking.
 

Digital Humanities Minor

Digital Humanities Minor courses integrate literary study with the use of digital tools and technologies. Students in the minor learn how to make interpretive arguments by building digital archives and maps, interacting with digital games, using web-based publishing platforms, and visualizing data. The minor pays particular attention to the culture of creation in literary and cultural analysis. 

Old Major: D-Literary Theory/Criticism

Literary Theory/Criticism courses teach academic and rigorous media comprehension, the major modes and schools of criticism and theory, and theories and techniques of reasoning, rational discourse, and argumentation.

Title: 
Special Studies: Shakespeare’s World
Instructors: 

Lara Bovilsky

Lara Bovilsky profile picture
  • Title: Associate Professor
  • Phone: 541-346-1309
  • Office: 246 PLC
  • Office Hours: Fall term: Monday 1-3pm, Thursday 9-10am, or by appointment
Department Section Description: 

Students in “Shakespeare’s World” learn to read Shakespeare’s works in relation to the cultural, literary, and historical contexts in which he wrote. This can be a first course in Shakespeare (no prerequisites). In Winter 2020, we will look at how Shakespeare’s education, amiable rivalry with another playwright, and interest in the fad of tales of revenge help us understand his popular early tragedy, Titus Andronicus. Then we’ll consider his extraordinary later tragedy, Macbeth, in light of English ideas about kingship, the supernatural, and gender. Throughout, we’ll learn about theatrical practice in Shakespeare’s day, and what it was like to be a playwright at a time when theater was controversial, protected by the monarch but seen as a threat to civil and moral order.

Fulfills: 

B-Literature 1500-1789

Literature, 1500-1789 courses focus on writings during the period of European exploration and colonization -- from the early English Renaissance to the late eighteenth-century -- in order to foster familiarity with key works in British and American literary history.  Literary history illustrates how literary works reflect, address, and resist the social and political environments in which they are produced as well as other works that have preceded them.  The study of early periods in particular sensitizes readers to historical transformations of the language itself.

English Minor

English Minor courses offer students centuries of cultural experience and representation in poetry, prose, drama, film, TV, new media, and folk artifacts.  The English minor can focus and extend the values of a liberal arts education, while also providing extensive training in writing, speaking, and critical thinking.
 

Old Major: B-Literature 1500-1789

Literature, 1500-1789 courses focus on writings during the period of European exploration and colonization -- from the early English Renaissance to the late eighteenth-century -- in order to foster familiarity with key works in British and American literary history.  Literary history illustrates how literary works reflect, address, and resist the social and political environments in which they are produced as well as other works that have preceded them.  The study of early periods in particular sensitizes readers to historical transformations of the language itself.

Title: 
Special Studies: Irish Cinema
Instructors: 

Mark Quigley

Mark Quigley profile picture
  • Title: Associate Professor
  • Phone: 541-346-1340
  • Office: 324 PLC
  • Office Hours: Fall Term: Monday 12-3pm
Department Section Description: 

Cinema and Ireland

From the earliest days of cinema, flickering images of Ireland’s distinctive landscapes and rich history have fired the imaginations of filmmakers and audiences. Irish culture, language, and myth have continued to lend a distinctly Irish “accent” to a wide variety of cinematic genres ever since. This course will explore the roles that Ireland and Irishness have played in the development of cinema’s history and narrative form while simultaneously considering how cinema has shaped modern Irish culture and Irish people’s understanding of themselves and their history.

 

Moving from the pioneers of cinema’s silent age and the early development of feature-length films through the advent of sound film and the rise of Hollywood’s celebrated “Golden Age,” the first part of the course will explore how a consideration of Ireland’s early screen portrayals can help bring the contours of modern cinema’s evolving narrative forms into sharper focus. In addition to examining early examples of the comedy, thriller, and melodrama genres, we will explore Ireland’s role in the birth of documentary cinema.

 

Tracing initiatives to develop a native Irish cinema, the rest of the course will grapple with the complexities posed by the project of developing and sustaining a national cinema—especially in a small country and a de-colonizing culture like Ireland’s.

 

Considering genres as diverse as animation, the biopic, romantic comedy, gangster movies, “band movies” and period films, we will focus especially on films dealing with the politics and violence of “the Troubles” of Northern Ireland, the historical drama of the Irish War of Independence and Civil War, and the wrenching cultural and social shifts accompanying Ireland’s rapid modernization over the last thirty years. We will look at the work of American and British filmmakers alongside that of a number of Irish and Irish-American Oscar nominees and winners such as John Ford, Lenny Abrahamson, Jim Sheridan, Neil Jordan, and Cartoon Saloon. Considering how these internationally celebrated filmmakers fit into the larger context of Irish film history developed by directors such as Leila Doolin, Pat Collins, Bob Quinn, Margo Harkin, Pat Murphy, Frank Stapleton, Johnny Gogan and Risteárd Ó Domhnaill, we will discuss the ways that contemporary cinema frames Ireland as a site where a global popular culture is at once proclaimed and contested.

Fulfills: 

E-Media/Folklore/Culture

Media, Folklore, and/or Culture courses focus on print and non-print media to explore culture and its processes of creative expression.

G-Empire/Race/Ethnicity

Empire, Race, and/or Ethnicity courses focus on ways that race matters in literature, media, and culture.  Recent courses have examined such matters as native American literature and film; nineteenth-century writings by slavers and enslaved people in the U.S. and British colonies; fiction and filmmaking in post-apartheid South Africa; Latinx science fiction and environmental justice, and the novels of Toni Morrison.

English Minor

English Minor courses offer students centuries of cultural experience and representation in poetry, prose, drama, film, TV, new media, and folk artifacts.  The English minor can focus and extend the values of a liberal arts education, while also providing extensive training in writing, speaking, and critical thinking.
 

Old Major: F-Upper-Division Elective

Upper-division Elective courses allow students to choose (or “elect”) courses or faculty specific to their own developing interests, enabling them thereby to shape their own educational experience.