ENG399 201701 Undergraduate

Term: 
Fall 2017
Course: 
ENG 399
Applies To: 
Undergraduate
Sections: 
Title: 
The Black Atlantic: Literature, History, Theory
Instructors: 

Elizabeth Bohls

Elizabeth Bohls profile picture
  • Title: Professor
  • Additional Title: Associate Department Head
  • Phone: 541-346-5484
  • Office: 263 PLC
  • Office Hours: S20 W 1-3 & R 1-2 via Zoom and by appointment
Department Section Description: 

Slavery shaped the ecology, economy, and culture of the Atlantic Rim, including parts of Europe, Africa, and the Americas. In the long eighteenth century (1660-1838), British slavery on the Caribbean sugar islands reached its peak, was fought by the abolitionist movement and ended by Parliament. Meanwhile, a rather different slave society matured in the United States. We will study the literary production of early Black writers and the representation of slavery in the Anglophone literature of the Atlantic Rim, including historical contexts and influential critical approaches. Primary materials include travel narratives, slave narratives, planter histories, political tracts, diaries and ships’ logs, as well as novels and poetry.

Fulfills: 

Old Major: B-Literature 1500-1789

Literature, 1500-1789 courses focus on writings during the period of European exploration and colonization -- from the early English Renaissance to the late eighteenth-century -- in order to foster familiarity with key works in British and American literary history.  Literary history illustrates how literary works reflect, address, and resist the social and political environments in which they are produced as well as other works that have preceded them.  The study of early periods in particular sensitizes readers to historical transformations of the language itself.

B-Literature 1500-1789

Literature, 1500-1789 courses focus on writings during the period of European exploration and colonization -- from the early English Renaissance to the late eighteenth-century -- in order to foster familiarity with key works in British and American literary history.  Literary history illustrates how literary works reflect, address, and resist the social and political environments in which they are produced as well as other works that have preceded them.  The study of early periods in particular sensitizes readers to historical transformations of the language itself.

G-Empire/Race/Ethnicity

Empire, Race, and/or Ethnicity courses focus on ways that race matters in literature, media, and culture.  Recent courses have examined such matters as native American literature and film; nineteenth-century writings by slavers and enslaved people in the U.S. and British colonies; fiction and filmmaking in post-apartheid South Africa; Latinx science fiction and environmental justice, and the novels of Toni Morrison.

English Minor

English Minor courses offer students centuries of cultural experience and representation in poetry, prose, drama, film, TV, new media, and folk artifacts.  The English minor can focus and extend the values of a liberal arts education, while also providing extensive training in writing, speaking, and critical thinking.