ENG381M 201704 Undergraduate

Term: 
Summer 2018
Course: 
ENG 381M
Applies To: 
Undergraduate
Sections: 
Title: 
Film, Media, & Culture
Instructors: 

Ulrick Casimir

Ulrick Casimir profile picture
  • Title: Career Instructor
  • Phone: 541-346-3977
  • Office: 223 PLC
  • Office Hours: Winter term: M, W 11-12:30 and by appt.
Department Section Description: 

Focusing primarily on American/Hollywood filmmaking from the late 1960s through today, this course looks closely at the representation and function of African-Americans and women in film. Using both mainstream and independent films as our primary texts, we will explore how African-Americans and women are depicted in Hollywood filmmaking, a process that will include engaging with critical essays as secondary texts to help us assess the cultural meanings and values that African-Americans and women tend to embody. The main goal of this course is to help us understand how African-Americans and women have been and continue to be used by cinema, in ways that both reflect and reflect upon our culture.

Fulfills: 

A & L

Arts & Letters (A&L) courses create meaningful opportunities for students to engage actively in the modes of inquiry that define a discipline. Courses are broad in scope and demonstrably liberal in nature (that is, courses that promote open inquiry from a variety of perspectives). Though some courses may focus on specialized subjects or approaches, there will be a substantial course content locating that subject in the broader context of the major issues of the discipline. Qualifying courses will not focus on teaching basic skills but will require the application or engagement of those skills through analysis and interpretation.

IP

Multicultural, Identity, Pluralism, and Tolerance (IP) courses examine the social construction of collective identities, the emergence of representative voices from varying social and cultural standpoints, and the effects of prejudice, intolerance, and discrimination. The purpose of courses in this category is to analyze the general principles underlying tolerance, or the lack of it.

Major I: F-Upper-Division Elective

Upper-division Elective courses allow students to choose (or “elect”) courses or faculty specific to their own developing interests, enabling them thereby to shape their own educational experience.

Major I: E-Folklore, Ethnic & Women's Literature

Folklore/Ethnic/Women’s Literature courses focus on works  in Folklore, ethnic American writing, and writing by women.

Major II: E-Media/Folklore/Culture

Media, Folklore, and/or Culture courses focus on print and non-print media to explore culture and its processes of creative expression.

Major II: G-Empire/Race/Ethnicity

Empire, Race, and/or Ethnicity courses focus on ways that race matters in literature, media, and culture.  Recent courses have examined such matters as native American literature and film; nineteenth-century writings by slavers and enslaved people in the U.S. and British colonies; fiction and filmmaking in post-apartheid South Africa; Latinx science fiction and environmental justice, and the novels of Toni Morrison.

Digital Humanities Minor

Digital Humanities Minor courses integrate literary study with the use of digital tools and technologies. Students in the minor learn how to make interpretive arguments by building digital archives and maps, interacting with digital games, using web-based publishing platforms, and visualizing data. The minor pays particular attention to the culture of creation in literary and cultural analysis. 

Title: 
Film, Media, & Culture
Instructors: 

Jenée Wilde

Jenée Wilde profile picture
  • Title: Career Instructor
  • Phone: 541-346-1051
  • Office: 331 PLC
  • Office Hours: Winter term: W 2:00-5:00 p.m.
Department Section Description: 

Aliens, monsters, killer androids, mutants.... Such metaphors may express cultural fears of the “other” that underlie social prejudice, intolerance, and discrimination. But viewers and fans may also read against the grain of normative cinematic images, finding identity and affirmation in the misunderstood and maligned. English 381 introduces students to critical thinking about the representation of  “otherness”

in speculative film and television media, including adaptations from comics. We will explore how binary structures of knowledge define social categories and how science fiction, fantasy, horror, and other non-realistic genres may simultaneously challenge and affirm what we “know” about gender, sexuality, class, race, ethnicity, nation, and ability. We also examine the contexts of media production and the diverse social positionings of viewers and fans that prompt (un)conventional readings of cinematic entertainment. The course incorporates a range of theoretical paradigms from film theory, queer theory, transgender studies, critical race theory, reception theory, and science fiction studies.

Fulfills: 

A & L

Arts & Letters (A&L) courses create meaningful opportunities for students to engage actively in the modes of inquiry that define a discipline. Courses are broad in scope and demonstrably liberal in nature (that is, courses that promote open inquiry from a variety of perspectives). Though some courses may focus on specialized subjects or approaches, there will be a substantial course content locating that subject in the broader context of the major issues of the discipline. Qualifying courses will not focus on teaching basic skills but will require the application or engagement of those skills through analysis and interpretation.

IP

Multicultural, Identity, Pluralism, and Tolerance (IP) courses examine the social construction of collective identities, the emergence of representative voices from varying social and cultural standpoints, and the effects of prejudice, intolerance, and discrimination. The purpose of courses in this category is to analyze the general principles underlying tolerance, or the lack of it.

Major I: F-Upper-Division Elective

Upper-division Elective courses allow students to choose (or “elect”) courses or faculty specific to their own developing interests, enabling them thereby to shape their own educational experience.

Major II: Upper-Division Elective

Upper-division Elective courses allow students to choose (or “elect”) courses or faculty specific to their own developing interests, enabling them thereby to shape their own educational experience.

Major II: E-Media/Folklore/Culture

Media, Folklore, and/or Culture courses focus on print and non-print media to explore culture and its processes of creative expression.

Comics Studies Minor

Comics Studies Minor courses present students with an international, historical, and critical perspective on the art of editorial cartoons, comic books, and graphic novels, and how these forms communicate, inform, and emotionally engage their audiences.  Students will be required to think outside of accustomed disciplinary boundaries, and to analyze and experiment with the interaction of both visual and linguistic systems of meaning.

Digital Humanities Minor

Digital Humanities Minor courses integrate literary study with the use of digital tools and technologies. Students in the minor learn how to make interpretive arguments by building digital archives and maps, interacting with digital games, using web-based publishing platforms, and visualizing data. The minor pays particular attention to the culture of creation in literary and cultural analysis.