ENG381 201703 Undergraduate

Term: 
Spring 2018
Course: 
ENG 381
Applies To: 
Undergraduate
Sections: 
Title: 
Film, Media, and Culture
Department Section Description: 

This course introduces students to the manner in which South Africans have been represented through fiction, documentary, and experimental films from the pre-apartheid to the post-apartheid eras. We will focus specifically on representations of blackness in South Africa in order to understand the historical perspective of the black South African experience through cinema, visual culture, and other literary forms. South Africa is credited as having one of the oldest filmmaking industries in the world and film was historically mobilized as a propaganda tool both before and during apartheid. However, films were also used as a tool of activism and resistance against the apartheid regime. Many of these films offer nuanced articulations of the black experience and offer insight into the complex ways in which black South Africans survived under an oppressive apartheid regime. We will also examine a range of films and filmmaking practices in the post-apartheid period in order to analyze a) the shifts in representations of blackness between the apartheid and post-apartheid periods and b) the complexities of representing blackness in post-apartheid South Africa. We will also broadly engage with questions of aesthetics and the notion of the national and national cinema in the South African context. Through screenings, interdisciplinary readings, and writings we will develop an understanding of the South African experience as it has been defined by race and racial formations. We will also examine representations of class, ethnicity, gender, and sexuality.

Fulfills: 

A & L

Arts & Letters (A&L) courses create meaningful opportunities for students to engage actively in the modes of inquiry that define a discipline. Courses are broad in scope and demonstrably liberal in nature (that is, courses that promote open inquiry from a variety of perspectives). Though some courses may focus on specialized subjects or approaches, there will be a substantial course content locating that subject in the broader context of the major issues of the discipline. Qualifying courses will not focus on teaching basic skills but will require the application or engagement of those skills through analysis and interpretation.

IP

Multicultural, Identity, Pluralism, and Tolerance (IP) courses examine the social construction of collective identities, the emergence of representative voices from varying social and cultural standpoints, and the effects of prejudice, intolerance, and discrimination. The purpose of courses in this category is to analyze the general principles underlying tolerance, or the lack of it.

E-Media/Folklore/Culture

Media, Folklore, and/or Culture courses focus on print and non-print media to explore culture and its processes of creative expression.

F-Gender/Ability/Queer Studies/Sexuality

Gender, Ability, Queer Studies, and/or Sexuality courses focus on the ways that issues of sexuality, gender, queerness, and disability are represented, critiqued, and developed in media and literature.

Digital Humanities Minor

Digital Humanities Minor courses integrate literary study with the use of digital tools and technologies. Students in the minor learn how to make interpretive arguments by building digital archives and maps, interacting with digital games, using web-based publishing platforms, and visualizing data. The minor pays particular attention to the culture of creation in literary and cultural analysis. 

English Minor

English Minor courses offer students centuries of cultural experience and representation in poetry, prose, drama, film, TV, new media, and folk artifacts.  The English minor can focus and extend the values of a liberal arts education, while also providing extensive training in writing, speaking, and critical thinking.
 

Title: 
Film, Media, and Culture
Instructors: 

Quinn Miller

Quinn Miller profile picture
  • Title: Associate Professor
  • Phone: 541-346-3968
  • Office: 447 PLC
  • Office Hours: On sabbatical 2018-19
Department Section Description: 

This course introduces students to critical thinking about the historical and economic factors influencing film, media, and cultural production in Hollywood and in response to Hollywood. Unconventional textual and contextual dynamics, understood as queer history, are the focus of the course, which draws on critical approaches to race, ethnicity, class, education, and ability in order to discuss the power relations and unpredictable signifying practices involved in taste stratification and family norms; erotic possibilities and gender differentiation; censorship and celebrity; and art, marketing, and advertising.

Syllabus: 
Fulfills: 

A & L

Arts & Letters (A&L) courses create meaningful opportunities for students to engage actively in the modes of inquiry that define a discipline. Courses are broad in scope and demonstrably liberal in nature (that is, courses that promote open inquiry from a variety of perspectives). Though some courses may focus on specialized subjects or approaches, there will be a substantial course content locating that subject in the broader context of the major issues of the discipline. Qualifying courses will not focus on teaching basic skills but will require the application or engagement of those skills through analysis and interpretation.

IP

Multicultural, Identity, Pluralism, and Tolerance (IP) courses examine the social construction of collective identities, the emergence of representative voices from varying social and cultural standpoints, and the effects of prejudice, intolerance, and discrimination. The purpose of courses in this category is to analyze the general principles underlying tolerance, or the lack of it.

E-Media/Folklore/Culture

Media, Folklore, and/or Culture courses focus on print and non-print media to explore culture and its processes of creative expression.

F-Gender/Ability/Queer Studies/Sexuality

Gender, Ability, Queer Studies, and/or Sexuality courses focus on the ways that issues of sexuality, gender, queerness, and disability are represented, critiqued, and developed in media and literature.

Digital Humanities Minor

Digital Humanities Minor courses integrate literary study with the use of digital tools and technologies. Students in the minor learn how to make interpretive arguments by building digital archives and maps, interacting with digital games, using web-based publishing platforms, and visualizing data. The minor pays particular attention to the culture of creation in literary and cultural analysis. 

English Minor

English Minor courses offer students centuries of cultural experience and representation in poetry, prose, drama, film, TV, new media, and folk artifacts.  The English minor can focus and extend the values of a liberal arts education, while also providing extensive training in writing, speaking, and critical thinking.