ENG363 201702 Undergraduate

Term: 
Winter 2018
Course: 
ENG 363
Applies To: 
Undergraduate
Sections: 
Title: 
Chicano/Latino Writers
Instructors: 

Sarah Wald

Sarah Wald profile picture
  • Title: Associate Professor, Environmental Studies & English
  • Additional Title: Associate Director of Environmental Studies; Director of Graduate Admissions for English
  • Phone: 541-346-1613
  • Office: 443 PLC
  • Office Hours: Winter term: not teaching; responding to email; sign up here: https://goo.gl/ZUocxh for appt.
  • Website: Website
Department Section Description: 

Latinx Literary Environmentalisms

Latinx literature and culture sit at the cutting edge of contemporary environmental thought. This class examines the intertwining of social and environmental justice in contemporary Latinx literature and cultural production, including fiction, film, and visual arts. We will particularly attend to environmental justice and to the forms of environmentalism that emerge from Chicana feminism.

Fulfills: 

IP

Multicultural, Identity, Pluralism, and Tolerance (IP) courses examine the social construction of collective identities, the emergence of representative voices from varying social and cultural standpoints, and the effects of prejudice, intolerance, and discrimination. The purpose of courses in this category is to analyze the general principles underlying tolerance, or the lack of it.

Major I: C-Literature 1789-Present

Literature, 1789 to the present courses focus on literary work produced over more than two centuries -- from the period of British romanticism and the early republic of the United States up to now -- in order to foster familiarity with key works in British and American literary history.  Literary history illustrates how literary works reflect, address, and resist the social and political environments in which they are produced as well as other works that have preceded them.

Major II: C-Literature 1789-Present

Literature, 1789 to the present courses focus on literary work produced over more than two centuries -- from the period of British romanticism and the early republic of the United States up to now -- in order to foster familiarity with key works in British and American literary history.  Literary history illustrates how literary works reflect, address, and resist the social and political environments in which they are produced as well as other works that have preceded them.

Major II: G-Empire/Race/Ethnicity

Empire, Race, and/or Ethnicity courses focus on ways that race matters in literature, media, and culture.  Recent courses have examined such matters as native American literature and film; nineteenth-century writings by slavers and enslaved people in the U.S. and British colonies; fiction and filmmaking in post-apartheid South Africa; Latinx science fiction and environmental justice, and the novels of Toni Morrison.