ENG335 202002 Undergraduate

Term: 
Winter 2021
Course: 
ENG 335
Applies To: 
Undergraduate
Course Description: 

Analysis and use of patterns of reasoning derived from the disciplines of rhetoric, informal logic, cognitive science, and the theory of argumentation.

Sections: 
Title: 
Inventing Arguments
Instructors: 

José Cortez

José Cortez profile picture
  • Title: Assistant Professor
  • Phone: 541-346-0069
  • Office: 319 PLC
  • Office Hours: F21: TUES/THUR 11:30-12:30
Department Section Description: 

Bullshit, Fake News, and Argumentation

The practice of bullshitting (“speech intended to persuade without regard for truth”) is firmly sedimented into civic life in the 21st century. Examples are everywhere: fake social media accounts and highjacked elections, accusations of fake news, fake academic controversies, deepfake videos, etc. We are awash in a deluge of bullshit these days. So how do you identify bullshit? And how do you combat it? This course intends to teach you how to call bullshit in good faith by learning and applying theories of argumentation. It will help you develop metacognition in argumentation so that you will be able to successfully call bullshit across discourse communities—be it in your friend group back home or in your next groundbreaking scholarly intervention. 

Fulfills: 

A & L

Arts & Letters (A&L) courses create meaningful opportunities for students to engage actively in the modes of inquiry that define a discipline. Courses are broad in scope and demonstrably liberal in nature (that is, courses that promote open inquiry from a variety of perspectives). Though some courses may focus on specialized subjects or approaches, there will be a substantial course content locating that subject in the broader context of the major issues of the discipline. Qualifying courses will not focus on teaching basic skills but will require the application or engagement of those skills through analysis and interpretation.

D-Theory/Rhetoric

Theory/Rhetoric courses teach media theory, the major modes and schools of criticism and theory, and theories and techniques of reasoning, rational discourse, and argumentation.

English Minor

English Minor courses offer students centuries of cultural experience and representation in poetry, prose, drama, film, TV, new media, and folk artifacts.  The English minor can focus and extend the values of a liberal arts education, while also providing extensive training in writing, speaking, and critical thinking.
 

WSCR Minor

The interdisciplinary minor in Writing, Public Speaking, and Critical Reasoning offers students a coherent program of courses that strengthen students' abilities to write well, to speak effectively in public, and to think critically. This minor is built on courses in English, Writing, and Philosophy and is taught by professors from English, Philosophy, and the Honors College.

WSCR Certificate

Writing, Public Speaking, and Critical Reasoning Certificate courses strengthen students' abilities to write well, to speak effectively in public, and to think critically.  This certificate program is built on courses in English, Writing, and Philosophy and is taught by professors from English, Philosophy, and the Honors College.