ENG321 201702 Undergraduate

Term: 
Winter 2018
Course: 
ENG 321
Applies To: 
Undergraduate
Sections: 
Title: 
English Novel
Instructors: 

Katherine Brundan

Katherine Brundan profile picture
  • Title: Senior Instructor I
  • Phone: 541-346-0528
  • Office: 218 Villard Hall
  • Office Hours: Winter term: Not teaching English Winter term
Department Section Description: 

The English Novel: Subject, Object and Abject

This course circulates through the world of the novel by taking a slightly unusual perspective: that of subjects and objects. The rise of the novel goes hand-in-hand with a focus on objects and commodities that help construct the subject as a fully-fledged individual. Our first novel, Robinson Crusoe, follows this obsession with objects -- and people-treated-as-objects -- to cement the hero’s status as a colonial subject. We then move to the abridged version of Richardson’s Clarissa, taking in Julia Kristeva’s notion of the abject (neither fully subject nor object) to help steer us through this surprisingly compelling and immersive novel. We finish with Jane Austen’s Northanger Abbey, where objects interact with the heroine in unusual ways, encouraging us to consider our own relationship with the novel as a commodity. This course will introduce students to concepts of literary theory, as well as an understanding of the early English novel.

Fulfills: 

A & L

Arts & Letters (A&L) courses create meaningful opportunities for students to engage actively in the modes of inquiry that define a discipline. Courses are broad in scope and demonstrably liberal in nature (that is, courses that promote open inquiry from a variety of perspectives). Though some courses may focus on specialized subjects or approaches, there will be a substantial course content locating that subject in the broader context of the major issues of the discipline. Qualifying courses will not focus on teaching basic skills but will require the application or engagement of those skills through analysis and interpretation.

Old Major: B-Literature 1500-1789

Literature, 1500-1789 courses focus on writings during the period of European exploration and colonization -- from the early English Renaissance to the late eighteenth-century -- in order to foster familiarity with key works in British and American literary history.  Literary history illustrates how literary works reflect, address, and resist the social and political environments in which they are produced as well as other works that have preceded them.  The study of early periods in particular sensitizes readers to historical transformations of the language itself.

B-Literature 1500-1789

Literature, 1500-1789 courses focus on writings during the period of European exploration and colonization -- from the early English Renaissance to the late eighteenth-century -- in order to foster familiarity with key works in British and American literary history.  Literary history illustrates how literary works reflect, address, and resist the social and political environments in which they are produced as well as other works that have preceded them.  The study of early periods in particular sensitizes readers to historical transformations of the language itself.

English Minor

English Minor courses offer students centuries of cultural experience and representation in poetry, prose, drama, film, TV, new media, and folk artifacts.  The English minor can focus and extend the values of a liberal arts education, while also providing extensive training in writing, speaking, and critical thinking.