ENG316 201703 Undergraduate

Term: 
Spring 2018
Course: 
ENG 316
Applies To: 
Undergraduate
Sections: 
Title: 
Women Writers’ Forms: Native Feminist Fiction
Instructors: 

Joyce Pualani Warren

Joyce Pualani Warren profile picture
  • Title: PostDoctoral Scholar Eth. Lit
  • Phone: 541-346-3953
  • Office: 265 PLC
  • Office Hours: Not teaching winter term; available by email
Department Section Description: 

This course will examine Native women’s fiction, paying particular attention to the ways its form and content uphold and contest terms like “feminism,” “fiction,” and “native.” The central concern of this course is Native women’s textual representations of their bodies and voices, both physical and figurative. We will examine texts by writers from various Pacific Islands and North America. Using the Native Hawaiian concept of “makawalu,” which means to view something from multiple perspectives, we will trace theories of Native feminisms as they play out in connection to the environment, reproduction, race, nuclearization, sovereignty, and sexuality, among other concepts. This intersectional genealogy will guide our critical analysis of short stories and novels, as well as their cinematic adaptations and representations in popular culture.

Fulfills: 

Major I: C-Literature 1789-Present

Literature, 1789 to the present courses focus on literary work produced over more than two centuries -- from the period of British romanticism and the early republic of the United States up to now -- in order to foster familiarity with key works in British and American literary history.  Literary history illustrates how literary works reflect, address, and resist the social and political environments in which they are produced as well as other works that have preceded them.

Major II: C-Literature 1789-Present

Literature, 1789 to the present courses focus on literary work produced over more than two centuries -- from the period of British romanticism and the early republic of the United States up to now -- in order to foster familiarity with key works in British and American literary history.  Literary history illustrates how literary works reflect, address, and resist the social and political environments in which they are produced as well as other works that have preceded them.

IP

Multicultural, Identity, Pluralism, and Tolerance (IP) courses examine the social construction of collective identities, the emergence of representative voices from varying social and cultural standpoints, and the effects of prejudice, intolerance, and discrimination. The purpose of courses in this category is to analyze the general principles underlying tolerance, or the lack of it.

Major II: F-Gender/Ability/Queer Studies/Sexuality

Gender, Ability, Queer Studies, and/or Sexuality courses focus on the ways that issues of sexuality, gender, queerness, and disability are represented, critiqued, and developed in media and literature.

Major I: E-Folklore, Ethnic & Women's Literature

Folklore/Ethnic/Women’s Literature courses focus on works  in Folklore, ethnic American writing, and writing by women.