ENG303 201703 Undergraduate

Term: 
Spring 2018
Course: 
ENG 303
Applies To: 
Undergraduate
Department Course Description: 

English 303 is designed to help students acquire analytic reading skills that are informed by the methods and approaches studied previously in ENG 301 and ENG 302. The course is divided into three parts, each of which focuses on using close reading skills across media and literary forms while pursuing the question, “What is a text?” The first section of the course will focus on a Victorian novel, Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre. Discussions will focus on two linked reading strategies–slow reading and close reading–and the varieties of interpretive work these reading practices make possible. In the second section of the course we will focus on film and televisual texts to analyze how formal media properties convey ideological meaning through cinematography, editing, sound, performance, and mise-en-scene. Finally, in the third section of the course we’ll read William Shakespeare’s Macbeth. We will pay close attention to the difficult textual history of the play and the ways in which it has been read at various times. We will also discuss what happens to the text of the play when it is staged.

Sections: 
Title: 
Foundations of the English Major: Text
Instructors: 

Warren Ginsberg

Warren Ginsberg profile picture
  • Title: Professor of English
  • Additional Title: Philip H. Knight Professor of Humanities Comparative Literature Program Faculty
  • Phone: 541-346-3958
  • Office: 257 PLC
  • Office Hours: Spring term: by Appointment

Heidi Kaufman

Heidi Kaufman profile picture
  • Title: Associate Professor
  • Additional Title: Director, DH Minor
  • Phone: 541-346-3932
  • Office: 327 PLC
  • Office Hours: Spring term: W 11-1
Fulfills: 

Old Major: Foundations of the Major

Foundations of the English Major courses are for students beginning the major and for those seriously considering it, the ENG 301-2-3 sequence provides a common intellectual experience for majors and a foundation for future studies in English, American, and Anglophone literatures, media, and folklore.  A full year of study in the Foundations sequence is intended to give English majors a solid background in the theory, key debates, and critical reading practices of the discipline as well as a sense of the history of the different kinds of texts we study, from the Medieval period to the present.

English Minor

English Minor courses offer students centuries of cultural experience and representation in poetry, prose, drama, film, TV, new media, and folk artifacts.  The English minor can focus and extend the values of a liberal arts education, while also providing extensive training in writing, speaking, and critical thinking.
 

Title: 
Foundations of the English Major: Text +Dis
Fulfills: 

English Minor

English Minor courses offer students centuries of cultural experience and representation in poetry, prose, drama, film, TV, new media, and folk artifacts.  The English minor can focus and extend the values of a liberal arts education, while also providing extensive training in writing, speaking, and critical thinking.
 

Title: 
Foundations of the English Major: Text +Dis
Fulfills: 

English Minor

English Minor courses offer students centuries of cultural experience and representation in poetry, prose, drama, film, TV, new media, and folk artifacts.  The English minor can focus and extend the values of a liberal arts education, while also providing extensive training in writing, speaking, and critical thinking.
 

Title: 
Foundations of the English Major: Text +Dis
Department Section Description: 

This discussion section is a supplement to the lecture course that meets TR each week. The focus of ENG 303 as the final course in the Foundations sequence is on close/slow reading. Having established contextual and theoretical approaches to literature, we now turn to the process of close and slow reading as an attentive approach to the texts themselves, finding in these works the close engagement that we sometimes overlook when considering the bigger picture. This course engages in close/slow reading practices and methodologies to develop and master active reading, critical thinking, and analytical writing skills. The discussion sections for ENG 303 require additional exercises in these processes and allow for more in-depth small group discussions of the texts from the course, providing more time to answer questions, revisit material, and in depth to draw out as a group the nuances of our individual reading experiences.

Fulfills: 

English Minor

English Minor courses offer students centuries of cultural experience and representation in poetry, prose, drama, film, TV, new media, and folk artifacts.  The English minor can focus and extend the values of a liberal arts education, while also providing extensive training in writing, speaking, and critical thinking.
 

Title: 
Foundations of the English Major: Text +Dis
Department Section Description: 

This discussion section is a supplement to the lecture course that meets TR each week. The focus of ENG 303 as the final course in the Foundations sequence is on close/slow reading. Having established contextual and theoretical approaches to literature, we now turn to the process of close and slow reading as an attentive approach to the texts themselves, finding in these works the close engagement that we sometimes overlook when considering the bigger picture. This course engages in close/slow reading practices and methodologies to develop and master active reading, critical thinking, and analytical writing skills. The discussion sections for ENG 303 require additional exercises in these processes and allow for more in-depth small group discussions of the texts from the course, providing more time to answer questions, revisit material, and in depth to draw out as a group the nuances of our individual reading experiences.

Fulfills: 

English Minor

English Minor courses offer students centuries of cultural experience and representation in poetry, prose, drama, film, TV, new media, and folk artifacts.  The English minor can focus and extend the values of a liberal arts education, while also providing extensive training in writing, speaking, and critical thinking.