ENG225 201802 Undergraduate

Term: 
Winter 2019
Course: 
ENG 225
Applies To: 
Undergraduate
Sections: 
Title: 
Age of King Arthur
Instructors: 

C. Anne Laskaya

C. Anne Laskaya profile picture
  • Title: Associate Professor
  • Phone: 541-346-1517
  • Office: 357 PLC
  • Office Hours: Fall term: W 1-3 pm except 11/7; F 10-11 except 11/2.
Department Section Description: 

This course provides students an exposure to English and French literature important for the English literary tradition, in modern translations, from the very Early to Late Middle Ages.  The course will include SOME Arthurian material, but will also look at examples of typical medieval literature concerned with the world and its challenges from 800 to 1500. Readings may include: fiction and historical chronicles, dream visions, poetry and drama, saints' lives, as well as some attention to medieval visual art and artifacts that can deepen our understanding of the world of early, high, and late medieval English literature. Requirements include: attendance, participation, quizzes, 2 papers, a group presentation project, final exam.

Fulfills: 

Major I: Lower-Division Elective

Lower-division Elective courses allow students to choose (or “elect”) courses or faculty specific to their own developing interests, enabling them thereby to shape their own educational experience.

Major II: Lower-Division Elective

Lower-division Elective courses allow students to choose (or “elect”) courses or faculty specific to their own developing interests, enabling them thereby to shape their own educational experience.  Major II students can also use one lower-division elective to fulfill the Writing Requirement with ENG 209 The Craft of the Sentence.

A & L

Arts & Letters (A&L) courses create meaningful opportunities for students to engage actively in the modes of inquiry that define a discipline. Courses are broad in scope and demonstrably liberal in nature (that is, courses that promote open inquiry from a variety of perspectives). Though some courses may focus on specialized subjects or approaches, there will be a substantial course content locating that subject in the broader context of the major issues of the discipline. Qualifying courses will not focus on teaching basic skills but will require the application or engagement of those skills through analysis and interpretation.