ENG205 202001 Undergraduate

Term: 
Fall 2020
Course: 
ENG 205
Applies To: 
Undergraduate
Sections: 
Title: 
Genre Topic: Captivity Narrative
Instructors: 

Gordon Sayre

Gordon Sayre profile picture
  • Title: Professor
  • Additional Title: Interim Summer 2020 Head of English, Director of Undergraduate Studies
  • Phone: 541-346-1313
  • Office: 472 PLC
  • Office Hours: Spring 2021: 2-3 pm Wednesdays, 12-2 pm Thursdays
Department Section Description: 

Captivity Narrative was the earliest popular genre in American literature, in the seventeenth century. Its roots go back to the Old Testament stories of Moses, Daniel and Jonah, and these archetypes have influenced centuries of confrontations between people of different faiths and cultures, and empires. In this course will read stories from the Mediterranean frontier between Islam and Christianity, and the American frontier between indigenous peoples and missionaries and explorers of Spanish, French and English colonies. The captivity genre also contributes to the Slave narrative and to modern cinematic and media accounts of hostages and wartime prisoners, who are numerous in today’s world.

Fulfills: 

Genre

Genre courses address a single literary/cinematic genre or “kind.”-- such as tragedy, autobiography, lyric, romance, etc.-- with the purpose of teaching students to read and perform critical, formal analyses of literary, cinematic, and cultural texts.  These courses help prepare students for the backbone of our curriculum: the Foundations of the English Major sequence (ENG 301-2-3).

English Minor

English Minor courses offer students centuries of cultural experience and representation in poetry, prose, drama, film, TV, new media, and folk artifacts.  The English minor can focus and extend the values of a liberal arts education, while also providing extensive training in writing, speaking, and critical thinking.
 

Title: 
Genre Topic: Blurbs
Instructors: 

Quinn Miller

Quinn Miller profile picture
  • Title: Associate Professor
  • Phone: 541-346-3978
  • Office: 447 PLC
  • Office Hours: Spring 2021: Wednesday, 8-11am
Department Section Description: 

This course examines the pithy praise appearing on book jackets and other product packaging. Blurbs are quick descriptions. They encourage consumption and a culture of evaluating texts for their artistry and importance. How far back in time does blurbing go? How big can a blurb be before it ceases to be a blurb? What distinctions exist among blurbs, the texts they address, reviews, and other forms of criticism? This course uses queer media studies and transgender studies to consider such questions. Emphasis will be on pushing the limits of the category, including through study of music distribution and capsule summaries of sitcoms. We will discuss issues of style, representation, and power by studying blurbs and other types of shortform writing, including by looking at endorsements (of varying lengths, in a range of venues) of everything from performance art to pop-up restaurants.

Fulfills: 

Genre

Genre courses address a single literary/cinematic genre or “kind.”-- such as tragedy, autobiography, lyric, romance, etc.-- with the purpose of teaching students to read and perform critical, formal analyses of literary, cinematic, and cultural texts.  These courses help prepare students for the backbone of our curriculum: the Foundations of the English Major sequence (ENG 301-2-3).

English Minor

English Minor courses offer students centuries of cultural experience and representation in poetry, prose, drama, film, TV, new media, and folk artifacts.  The English minor can focus and extend the values of a liberal arts education, while also providing extensive training in writing, speaking, and critical thinking.
 

Title: 
Genre Topic: Captivity Narrative
Instructors: 

Gordon Sayre

Gordon Sayre profile picture
  • Title: Professor
  • Additional Title: Interim Summer 2020 Head of English, Director of Undergraduate Studies
  • Phone: 541-346-1313
  • Office: 472 PLC
  • Office Hours: Spring 2021: 2-3 pm Wednesdays, 12-2 pm Thursdays
Department Section Description: 

Captivity Narrative was the earliest popular genre in American literature, in the seventeenth century. Its roots go back to the Old Testament stories of Moses, Daniel and Jonah, and these archetypes have influenced centuries of confrontations between people of different faiths and cultures, and empires. In this course will read stories from the Mediterranean frontier between Islam and Christianity, and the American frontier between indigenous peoples and missionaries and explorers of Spanish, French and English colonies. The captivity genre also contributes to the Slave narrative and to modern cinematic and media accounts of hostages and wartime prisoners, who are numerous in today’s world.

Fulfills: 

Genre

Genre courses address a single literary/cinematic genre or “kind.”-- such as tragedy, autobiography, lyric, romance, etc.-- with the purpose of teaching students to read and perform critical, formal analyses of literary, cinematic, and cultural texts.  These courses help prepare students for the backbone of our curriculum: the Foundations of the English Major sequence (ENG 301-2-3).

English Minor

English Minor courses offer students centuries of cultural experience and representation in poetry, prose, drama, film, TV, new media, and folk artifacts.  The English minor can focus and extend the values of a liberal arts education, while also providing extensive training in writing, speaking, and critical thinking.