ENG205 201803 Undergraduate

Term: 
Spring 2019
Course: 
ENG 205
Applies To: 
Undergraduate
Sections: 
Title: 
Genre: Fantasy
Instructors: 

Elizabeth (Betsy) Wheeler

Elizabeth (Betsy) Wheeler profile picture
  • Title: Associate Professor
  • Additional Title: Director, Disability Studies Minor
  • Phone: 541-346-3929
  • Office: 238 PLC
Department Section Description: 

This genre course revolves around key figures of fantasy literature such as magic, mythical beasts, supernatural powers, bodily transformation, portals, talking animals, enchanted objects, quests, and world-building. Each one of these figures is a motif: “a unit within literature that proves so useful, so infectious, that it begins to take on a life of its own. There is a word for such things now: a ‘meme,’ an idea that behaves like a gene in its ability to replicate faithfully and abundantly, but also on occasion to adapt, mutate, and therefore survive in different forms and cultures.” (Helen Cooper). We trace these motifs from the twelfth to the twenty-first century to see how the fantasy genre works, how it transforms itself across time, and how it reflects the worldviews of the writer’s era. Texts include medieval werewolf legends, King Arthur stories, The Aberdeen Bestiary, The Tempest, Alice in Wonderland, Harry Potter, and Nalo Hopkinson’s Sister Mine. The course assumes a working knowledge of the Harry Potter series before the term begins.

Fulfills: 

A & L

Arts & Letters (A&L) courses create meaningful opportunities for students to engage actively in the modes of inquiry that define a discipline. Courses are broad in scope and demonstrably liberal in nature (that is, courses that promote open inquiry from a variety of perspectives). Though some courses may focus on specialized subjects or approaches, there will be a substantial course content locating that subject in the broader context of the major issues of the discipline. Qualifying courses will not focus on teaching basic skills but will require the application or engagement of those skills through analysis and interpretation.

Lower-Division Elective

Lower-division Elective courses allow students to choose (or “elect”) courses or faculty specific to their own developing interests, enabling them thereby to shape their own educational experience.  Major II students can also use one lower-division elective to fulfill the Writing Requirement with ENG 209 The Craft of the Sentence.

Genre

Genre courses address a single literary/cinematic genre or “kind.”-- such as tragedy, autobiography, lyric, romance, etc.-- with the purpose of teaching students to read and perform critical, formal analyses of literary, cinematic, and cultural texts.  These courses help prepare students for the backbone of our curriculum: the Foundations of the English Major sequence (ENG 301-2-3).

English Minor

English Minor courses offer students centuries of cultural experience and representation in poetry, prose, drama, film, TV, new media, and folk artifacts.  The English minor can focus and extend the values of a liberal arts education, while also providing extensive training in writing, speaking, and critical thinking.
 

Title: 
Genre: Slave Narratives
Instructors: 

Faith Barter

Faith Barter profile picture
  • Title: Assistant Professor
  • Phone: 541-346-1510
  • Office: 320 PLC
  • Office Hours: Summer term 6/21-7/17: Weds. 12pm-3pm (Zoom only)
Department Section Description: 

Though the slave narrative genre reached its peak in the mid-19th century, this mode of autobiography has a history that stretches from the 1700s to the present across numerous oceans, islands, and continents. We will take seriously the historical origins of the slave narrative, while also examining the ways in which it isn’t justautobiography—how its autobiographical function is often inseparable from its work to protest, resist, and evade oppressive structures. This course also considers how the generic conventions of the slave narrative operate in fiction, speculative fiction (including neo-slave narratives), film, and legal testimony or confession. In studying the slave narrative as a genre, we will address the material conditions that influence this form of Black authorship, and we will critique the ways that this genre has historically been appropriated, mediated, circulated, and studied.

Fulfills: 

A & L

Arts & Letters (A&L) courses create meaningful opportunities for students to engage actively in the modes of inquiry that define a discipline. Courses are broad in scope and demonstrably liberal in nature (that is, courses that promote open inquiry from a variety of perspectives). Though some courses may focus on specialized subjects or approaches, there will be a substantial course content locating that subject in the broader context of the major issues of the discipline. Qualifying courses will not focus on teaching basic skills but will require the application or engagement of those skills through analysis and interpretation.

Lower-Division Elective

Lower-division Elective courses allow students to choose (or “elect”) courses or faculty specific to their own developing interests, enabling them thereby to shape their own educational experience.  Major II students can also use one lower-division elective to fulfill the Writing Requirement with ENG 209 The Craft of the Sentence.

Genre

Genre courses address a single literary/cinematic genre or “kind.”-- such as tragedy, autobiography, lyric, romance, etc.-- with the purpose of teaching students to read and perform critical, formal analyses of literary, cinematic, and cultural texts.  These courses help prepare students for the backbone of our curriculum: the Foundations of the English Major sequence (ENG 301-2-3).

English Minor

English Minor courses offer students centuries of cultural experience and representation in poetry, prose, drama, film, TV, new media, and folk artifacts.  The English minor can focus and extend the values of a liberal arts education, while also providing extensive training in writing, speaking, and critical thinking.