ENG205 201703 Undergraduate

Term: 
Spring 2018
Course: 
ENG 205
Applies To: 
Undergraduate
Sections: 
Title: 
Genre: Robot Stories
Instructors: 

Lara Bovilsky

Lara Bovilsky profile picture
  • Title: Associate Professor
  • Phone: 541-346-1309
  • Office: 246 PLC
  • Office Hours: Spring term: MON 1-3, ThUR 9-10 or by appt.
Department Section Description: 

This course will survey the long history of stories about the creation of artificial men and women. We’ll look at the desires expressed by this genre, most of all, the desire to perfect or eliminate what is most human. Familiar questions – can robots feel? can we tell who is a robot? – will be considered alongside the traditional use of robots to understand or emblematize justice, sin, progress and modernity, self-awareness or simplicity, indifference, skill, invention, emotion, and art itself. Examples will be drawn from both real and fictional robots in literature and in film. Texts will include: Homer, Hesiod, Spenser, Descartes, Vaucanson, Shelley, Hoffmann, Capek, Lem, MetropolisTerminator 2, and Blade Runner.

Fulfills: 

Old Major: Lower-Division Elective

Lower-division Elective courses allow students to choose (or “elect”) courses or faculty specific to their own developing interests, enabling them thereby to shape their own educational experience.

Genre

Genre courses address a single literary/cinematic genre or “kind.”-- such as tragedy, autobiography, lyric, romance, etc.-- with the purpose of teaching students to read and perform critical, formal analyses of literary, cinematic, and cultural texts.  These courses help prepare students for the backbone of our curriculum: the Foundations of the English Major sequence (ENG 301-2-3).

English Minor

English Minor courses offer students centuries of cultural experience and representation in poetry, prose, drama, film, TV, new media, and folk artifacts.  The English minor can focus and extend the values of a liberal arts education, while also providing extensive training in writing, speaking, and critical thinking.
 

Title: 
Genre: Tragedy
Instructors: 

Paul Peppis

Paul Peppis profile picture
  • Title: Professor
  • Additional Title: Director, Oregon Humanities Center
  • Phone: 541-346-7017
  • Office: 154 PLC
  • Office Hours: Spring term: Thursday 2:00-5:00 pm
Department Section Description: 

Genre courses focus on particular genres and forms crucial for the study of English, American, and Anglophone literature and culture and are aimed primarily at English majors. This course on tragedy traces the historical development and transformation of the genre and places strong emphasis on close reading and critical analytic skills. The course studies a variety of examples of and responses to tragedy across literary history from ancient Greece to the present. It aims to help students develop the ability to read tragedies with discernment and comprehension and to understand their conventions and perform critical formal analyses of tragedies as writers adopt and adapt the genre across time. The course assumes that any history of tragedy is at root a history of forms and conventions rather than a comprehensive survey of canonical works and authors. It emphasizes the idea that each tragedy can be approached as an encounter with previous tragedies, whose formal patterns and assumptions it repeats, modifies, or rejects. Likely texts to be covered include: SophoclesOedipus Rex; William Shakespeare, Hamlet; Mary Shelley, Frankenstein; Nella Larsen, Passing; Eugene O’Neill, A Long Day’s Journey into Night; Wole Soyinka, Death and the King’s Horseman; Brian Vaughan, Pride of Baghdad.

Fulfills: 

Old Major: Lower-Division Elective

Lower-division Elective courses allow students to choose (or “elect”) courses or faculty specific to their own developing interests, enabling them thereby to shape their own educational experience.

Genre

Genre courses address a single literary/cinematic genre or “kind.”-- such as tragedy, autobiography, lyric, romance, etc.-- with the purpose of teaching students to read and perform critical, formal analyses of literary, cinematic, and cultural texts.  These courses help prepare students for the backbone of our curriculum: the Foundations of the English Major sequence (ENG 301-2-3).

English Minor

English Minor courses offer students centuries of cultural experience and representation in poetry, prose, drama, film, TV, new media, and folk artifacts.  The English minor can focus and extend the values of a liberal arts education, while also providing extensive training in writing, speaking, and critical thinking.