ENG205 201702 Undergraduate

Term: 
Winter 2018
Course: 
ENG 205
Applies To: 
Undergraduate
Course Description: 

Traces the historical development and transformations of key genres for the study of English and American literature and culture, including canonical and popular literary as well as media forms. Repeatable once for a maximum of 8 credits when topic changes.

Sections: 
Title: 
Genre: Autobiography
Instructors: 

Mary Wood

Mary Wood profile picture
  • Title: Professor
  • Additional Title: Director of Graduate Studies
  • Phone: 541-346-3010
  • Office: 445 PLC
  • Office Hours: Spring term: MON 1:00-3:00, THUR 2:00-4:00
Department Section Description: 

This course will examine the development of autobiography as a literary genre from the spiritual narratives of medieval women mystics to the graphic memoirs of twenty-first century writers. Along the way we will consider a range of autobiographical forms, including slave narrative, immigrant autobiography, disability narrative, personal-political essay, autobiographical novel, memoir, and letters. Questions addressed may include: How did spiritual autobiography enable women mystics to sidestep charges of heresy? Why did former slaves working in the abolitionist movement find the genre of autobiography particularly useful to argue for universal freedom and equality? How have race, class, gender, and citizenship status defined life stories in the American context? How have life stories reproduced, intersected with, and resisted dominant narratives of life trajectories?

Fulfills: 

Major I: Lower-Division Elective

Lower-division Elective courses allow students to choose (or “elect”) courses or faculty specific to their own developing interests, enabling them thereby to shape their own educational experience.

Major II: Genre

Genre courses address a single literary/cinematic genre or “kind.”-- such as tragedy, autobiography, lyric, romance, etc.-- with the purpose of teaching students to read and perform critical, formal analyses of literary, cinematic, and cultural texts.  These courses help prepare students for the backbone of our curriculum: the Foundations of the English Major sequence (ENG 301-2-3).

Title: 
Genre: Lyric
Instructors: 

Forest Pyle

Forest Pyle profile picture
  • Title: Professor
  • Phone: 541-346-3928
  • Office: 270 PLC
  • Office Hours: Not teaching winter term
Department Section Description: 

From the Early Modern lyric poetry of Shakespeare and Donne through the “lyrical ballads,” songs, and odes of British Romanticism and the American lyrical experiments of Dickinson and Whitman and the work of modernist and post-modernist lyric poets to the “lyrics” of our contemporary popular music in the troubadour and hip-hop traditions, we will explore the many forms and experiences of the “lyric.” While there is no consensus about the classification or definition of the “lyric,” there are many explorations of this term and the variety of literary and cultural practices it might describe. For some authors and critics, the lyric announces a new deepened experience of selfhood, one marked by the prevalence of the subjective voice. For others, the lyric refers to any non-narrative poem that emphasizes its own musical qualities. Some artists and critics believe that the “lyric” refers to a “spot of time” or “privileged instance” that erupts from and interrupts the chronological unfolding of time. And there are prose fiction writers, filmmakers, and videographers who believe that the “lyric” or the “lyrical” is something that can be experienced in any medium.  Over the course of this term, we will explore this range of possibilities in narrative film, prose fiction, and contemporary music as well as certain forms of poetry.

Fulfills: 

Major I: Lower-Division Elective

Lower-division Elective courses allow students to choose (or “elect”) courses or faculty specific to their own developing interests, enabling them thereby to shape their own educational experience.

Major II: Genre

Genre courses address a single literary/cinematic genre or “kind.”-- such as tragedy, autobiography, lyric, romance, etc.-- with the purpose of teaching students to read and perform critical, formal analyses of literary, cinematic, and cultural texts.  These courses help prepare students for the backbone of our curriculum: the Foundations of the English Major sequence (ENG 301-2-3).