ENG104 201803 Undergraduate

Term: 
Spring 2019
Course: 
ENG 104
Applies To: 
Undergraduate
Sections: 
Title: 
Introduction to Literature: Fiction
Instructors: 

Henry Wonham

Henry Wonham profile picture
  • Title: Professor
  • Additional Title:
  • Phone: 541-346-3266
  • Office: 436 Tykeson Hall
  • Office Hours: No office hours; available by email
Department Section Description: 

Students in ENG 104 will read and discuss a series of short story cycles by some of the America’s greatest writers of prose fiction.  The short story cycle is a unique form of fiction.  Sometimes referred to as “linked stories” or “novels-in-stories,” the form explores the gray area between collections of stories and novels. According to literary scholar Susan Garland Mann, “there is only one essential characteristic of the short story cycle: the stories are both self-sufficient and interrelated. On the one hand, the stories work independently of one another: the reader is capable of understanding each of them without going beyond the limits of the individual story. On the other hand. . . the ability of the story cycle . . . to work on a larger scale . . . resembles what is accomplished in the novel.”

Through its exploration of four classic short-story cycles, the course will address basic questions about the nature of prose narrative and about the interrelated activities of reading, writing, and interpretation. What is a story, and what role do stories play in our cultural and political lives? Is interpretation of a literary text a purely subjective process, or are some interpretations more valid than others?  Narrative technique, point of view, and character development are some of the terms and concepts examined in the course.  Weekly readings of are substantial in scope and difficulty, and students will be asked to compose two critical essays, totaling 10 pages. As a basic introduction to a major genre in the field of literary studies, this course satisfies the university’s Group Requirement in the Arts and Letters category.  It is not recommended for English Majors, who are encouraged to enroll in the Department’s more historically oriented and comprehensive English Major sequence.

Fulfills: 

A & L

Arts & Letters (A&L) courses create meaningful opportunities for students to engage actively in the modes of inquiry that define a discipline. Courses are broad in scope and demonstrably liberal in nature (that is, courses that promote open inquiry from a variety of perspectives). Though some courses may focus on specialized subjects or approaches, there will be a substantial course content locating that subject in the broader context of the major issues of the discipline. Qualifying courses will not focus on teaching basic skills but will require the application or engagement of those skills through analysis and interpretation.

Lower-Division Elective

Lower-division Elective courses allow students to choose (or “elect”) courses or faculty specific to their own developing interests, enabling them thereby to shape their own educational experience.  Major II students can also use one lower-division elective to fulfill the Writing Requirement with ENG 209 The Craft of the Sentence.

English Minor

English Minor courses offer students centuries of cultural experience and representation in poetry, prose, drama, film, TV, new media, and folk artifacts.  The English minor can focus and extend the values of a liberal arts education, while also providing extensive training in writing, speaking, and critical thinking.
 

Title: 
Introduction to Literature: Fiction
Instructors: 

Helen Huang

Helen Huang profile picture
  • Title: Career Instructor
  • Phone: 541-346-1542
  • Office: 301C Tykeson Hall
  • Office Hours: Summer term 6/21-8/14: MON 12-2 pm
Department Section Description: 

This course explores how American short stories portray the grotesque and why the grotesque is a signature element in American literature. A plethora of scholarship has examined the relationship between the grotesque and American short stories; however, the discussion of how affect, resistance, reginal writing, gender, and race complicate the grotesque as a cultural artifact in American short stories is scarce.

 

From reading Herman Melville’s “Bartleby, the Scrivener,” Perkins Gilman’s “The Yellow Wallpaper,” Sherwood Anderson’s “The Book of the Grotesque,” and Flannery O’Connor’s “A Good Man Is Hard to Find,” to name a few, we will examine how plot, point of view, tone, symbol, and imagery not only shape protagonists with a grotesque character but represent the grotesque as a necessity for these short stories.

 

Contemporary affect studies will help us read the grotesque and the chosen texts against the grain. For example, Gilles Deleuze’s interpretation of Bartleby invites us to decode the emotion embedded in Bartleby’s bizarre phrase “I would prefer not to.” Through reading selected literary texts and criticisms, this course leads students to understand how American short stories and the grotesque demonstrate unknown but affective sides of American culture.

Fulfills: 

A & L

Arts & Letters (A&L) courses create meaningful opportunities for students to engage actively in the modes of inquiry that define a discipline. Courses are broad in scope and demonstrably liberal in nature (that is, courses that promote open inquiry from a variety of perspectives). Though some courses may focus on specialized subjects or approaches, there will be a substantial course content locating that subject in the broader context of the major issues of the discipline. Qualifying courses will not focus on teaching basic skills but will require the application or engagement of those skills through analysis and interpretation.

Lower-Division Elective

Lower-division Elective courses allow students to choose (or “elect”) courses or faculty specific to their own developing interests, enabling them thereby to shape their own educational experience.  Major II students can also use one lower-division elective to fulfill the Writing Requirement with ENG 209 The Craft of the Sentence.

English Minor

English Minor courses offer students centuries of cultural experience and representation in poetry, prose, drama, film, TV, new media, and folk artifacts.  The English minor can focus and extend the values of a liberal arts education, while also providing extensive training in writing, speaking, and critical thinking.
 

Title: 
Introduction to Literature: Fiction
Instructors: 

Kristy Bryant-Berg

Kristy Bryant-Berg profile picture
  • Title: Senior Instructor
  • Phone: 541-346-3975
  • Office: 343 PLC
  • Office Hours: Summer term 7/18-8/14: 11-12 via Zoom
Department Section Description: 

This course offers a broad introduction to literature via examination of the American short story. We will begin in the 19th century with several of Poe’s short stories and examine samples of his work to appreciate his innovations in genre and form, and then trace these developments to his 20th century successors, both modern and contemporary, sampling from genres like gothic, horror, fantasy, detective mysteries, and science fiction. We will explore both the psychological and social underpinnings that motivate fanciful, mysterious, surprising, disturbing and even horrific tales to examine their disruption of status quo assumptions and explore their representations of submerged cultural anxieties. Brief lectures will provide background about each author’s larger work and contextualize each short story, class discussions and group work will be geared to strengthen close reading skills through careful attention to form as content, and secondary analyses of the short stories will be examined to discover diverse interpretations and reactions to each text.

Fulfills: 

A & L

Arts & Letters (A&L) courses create meaningful opportunities for students to engage actively in the modes of inquiry that define a discipline. Courses are broad in scope and demonstrably liberal in nature (that is, courses that promote open inquiry from a variety of perspectives). Though some courses may focus on specialized subjects or approaches, there will be a substantial course content locating that subject in the broader context of the major issues of the discipline. Qualifying courses will not focus on teaching basic skills but will require the application or engagement of those skills through analysis and interpretation.

Lower-Division Elective

Lower-division Elective courses allow students to choose (or “elect”) courses or faculty specific to their own developing interests, enabling them thereby to shape their own educational experience.  Major II students can also use one lower-division elective to fulfill the Writing Requirement with ENG 209 The Craft of the Sentence.

English Minor

English Minor courses offer students centuries of cultural experience and representation in poetry, prose, drama, film, TV, new media, and folk artifacts.  The English minor can focus and extend the values of a liberal arts education, while also providing extensive training in writing, speaking, and critical thinking.