ENG104 201802 Undergraduate

Term: 
Winter 2019
Course: 
ENG 104
Applies To: 
Undergraduate
Sections: 
Title: 
Introduction to Literature: Fiction
Instructors: 

Angela Rovak

Angela Rovak profile picture
  • Title: English Graduate Student / GE
  • Phone: 541-346-0054
  • Office: PLC 234
  • Office Hours: Fall term: T 3:00-4:00, W 2:00-4:00
Department Section Description: 

In this course, you will learn how to identify, interpret, and form arguments about the elements of literary fiction. We will focus on the literary representations of black girlhood in texts that span the 20th and 21st centuries. In ENG 104: Introduction to Fiction we will read the stories of young black women as they move through the difficult transition from childhood to adulthood. We will read novels and short stories that show a diversity of experiences of black girlhood. We will consider how black women’s stories of girlhood and coming-of-age narratives function as literature through discussions of plot, characterization, historical context, point of view, setting, voice, narrative structure, and experimentation. While this class is not a survey of black fiction or black women’s fiction, we will consider how the intersection of race, gender, and age influence authors’ literary strategies.

 

Fulfills: 

Major II: Lower-Division Elective

Lower-division Elective courses allow students to choose (or “elect”) courses or faculty specific to their own developing interests, enabling them thereby to shape their own educational experience.  Major II students can also use one lower-division elective to fulfill the Writing Requirement with ENG 209 The Craft of the Sentence.

A & L

Arts & Letters (A&L) courses create meaningful opportunities for students to engage actively in the modes of inquiry that define a discipline. Courses are broad in scope and demonstrably liberal in nature (that is, courses that promote open inquiry from a variety of perspectives). Though some courses may focus on specialized subjects or approaches, there will be a substantial course content locating that subject in the broader context of the major issues of the discipline. Qualifying courses will not focus on teaching basic skills but will require the application or engagement of those skills through analysis and interpretation.

Title: 
Introduction to Literature: Fiction
Instructors: 

Avinnash Tiwari

Avinnash Tiwari profile picture
  • Title: Career Instructor
  • Phone: 541-346-0061
  • Office: 444 PLC
  • Office Hours: Fall term: W 2-5 & by appointment
Department Section Description: 

Through this course, students develop analytical skills that will allow them to think, write, and speak intelligently about fiction. The course addresses basic questions about the nature of prose narrative and the interrelated activities of reading, writing, and interpretation. What is a story, and what role do stories play in our cultural and political lives? Is interpretation of a literary text a purely subjective process, or are some interpretations more valid than others? Weekly readings of short stories and novels are substantial in scope and difficulty, and students will be asked to compose critical essays of varying length, as well as work on their own creative story-telling. During this 50th anniversary celebrating the creation of Black Studies programs, we’ll focus primarily on the writings of Black authors throughout the 20th and 21st centuries. Even a cursory immersion into these stories quickly upsets any progressive narrative concerning race, gender, sexuality, and other facets of identity and power in the U.S. Equally important, we will explore the ways in which these stories and authors craft fiction in order to tell the all-too real story of the U.S. itself.

 

Fulfills: 

Major II: Lower-Division Elective

Lower-division Elective courses allow students to choose (or “elect”) courses or faculty specific to their own developing interests, enabling them thereby to shape their own educational experience.  Major II students can also use one lower-division elective to fulfill the Writing Requirement with ENG 209 The Craft of the Sentence.

A & L

Arts & Letters (A&L) courses create meaningful opportunities for students to engage actively in the modes of inquiry that define a discipline. Courses are broad in scope and demonstrably liberal in nature (that is, courses that promote open inquiry from a variety of perspectives). Though some courses may focus on specialized subjects or approaches, there will be a substantial course content locating that subject in the broader context of the major issues of the discipline. Qualifying courses will not focus on teaching basic skills but will require the application or engagement of those skills through analysis and interpretation.

Title: 
Introduction to Literature: Fiction
Instructors: 

David Li

David Li profile picture
  • Title: Professor
  • Additional Title: Collins Professor of the Humanities
  • Phone: 541-346-3940
  • Office: 275 PL
Department Section Description: 

This is an introductory class to literature. As such, it emphasizes the double meanings inherent in literature’s etymological origin, “literacy.” We shall develop the competency to  “read” and “write” about the kind of texts that are considered “literary,” and more specifically about a type of literature called, “American short fiction.”

Instead of skimming for information, the class is designed to cultivate the ability to read slowly and write skillfully. It entails the kind of concentration that defies the contemporary culture of attention deficit disorder.

 

Fulfills: 

A & L

Arts & Letters (A&L) courses create meaningful opportunities for students to engage actively in the modes of inquiry that define a discipline. Courses are broad in scope and demonstrably liberal in nature (that is, courses that promote open inquiry from a variety of perspectives). Though some courses may focus on specialized subjects or approaches, there will be a substantial course content locating that subject in the broader context of the major issues of the discipline. Qualifying courses will not focus on teaching basic skills but will require the application or engagement of those skills through analysis and interpretation.

Major II: Lower-Division Elective

Lower-division Elective courses allow students to choose (or “elect”) courses or faculty specific to their own developing interests, enabling them thereby to shape their own educational experience.  Major II students can also use one lower-division elective to fulfill the Writing Requirement with ENG 209 The Craft of the Sentence.